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The Girl who was Blue
     

The Girl who was Blue

5.0 1
by Ms. Sally Osgood Lee
 
This is a story about a little girl who is always sad. After going to the doctor, she starts to take some medicine that makes her feel better. It is a book to help kids with special problems feel better about their differences.

Overview

This is a story about a little girl who is always sad. After going to the doctor, she starts to take some medicine that makes her feel better. It is a book to help kids with special problems feel better about their differences.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781481139106
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
12/07/2012
Pages:
34
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.09(d)

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The Girl who was Blue 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
Have you ever been blue? No, I don’t mean the color blue, like the Smurfs (do any kids today even know about the Smurfs?). I mean blue as in really sad all the time. Once there was a little girl who was blue. Oh, she had a lot of blue things—her bed, curtains, dresser, hairbrush, even her cat’s bow. But her real problem was that, even though she had everything a little girl could want, she was still always sad. She tried to feel better by wearing her mother’s white dress, pretending to fly over the city, smelling the flowers outside, and pretending to fly through space, but nothing worked and she still felt blue. Finally, her mother took her to the doctor. The doctor told her that she was one of those children who has a brain that lies to them and tells them to be sad. What do you think the doctor did for her? And what was the result? While it appears that we are living in an over-medicated society, it is a fact that there are some people, including many children, who have genuine clinical depression and truly need medicine to help them with it. Youngsters who are dealing with depression or have family members who are will certainly benefit from this book, and the rest of us can learn an important lesson on the subject by reading the book and thus be more empathetic with such individuals.