ISBN-10:
0615138004
ISBN-13:
9780615138008
Pub. Date:
05/02/2007
Publisher:
Trinity Alumi Association
The Gods of Business: The Intersection of Faith and the Marketplace / Edition 3

The Gods of Business: The Intersection of Faith and the Marketplace / Edition 3

by Todd Albertson

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Overview

Throughout recorded history, religion and ethics remain the primary sources of conflict in life. The 21st Century is right on track, from the war in the Middle East to sectarian violence nearly everywhere else. Hardly a day goes by without religious conflicts being in the headlines. Additionally, the news is filled with the shenanigans of Enron, WorldCom and gas company price gouging, forcing hard questions about business ethics to the forefront of most peoples' minds.

In The Gods of Business, Dr. Todd Albertson maps the intersection of faith and the marketplace. In plain language he analyzes the world's major religions-Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Secular Postmodernism, Shintoism, and Sikhism-and how their spiritual traditions impact business ethics.

The Gods of Business provides telling insights into the silent subtleties and the loudly proclaimed dogmas that dramatically affect global business, leaving many newcomers unaware, confused or wishing they could just turn back the clock and deal with their hometown ways of doing things.

This book is a fascinating, insightful and entertaining read that will change the way you look at the world around you.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780615138008
Publisher: Trinity Alumi Association
Publication date: 05/02/2007
Pages: 202
Product dimensions: 9.00(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.46(d)

About the Author

Writer, speaker, and entrepreneur Dr. Todd Albertson is an expert on organizational behavior, global business practices and religious worldviews. His commonsense take on these issues derives from both his academic training and from his real world business experiences.

Dr. Albertson graduated in 1988 with a BA degree with a special focus on International Business. He earned an MBA in 1995. In 2005 he graduated with a PhD in Theology & Culture.

Dr. Albertson worked for a venture capital firm, was an evangelist for the worldwide leader in computer software and solutions, was CEO of a transportation and logistics company, and founded a new media dot com. More recently, he did relief work in Asia.

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: The Dilemma

PRINCE HENRY THE NAVIGATOR
Prince Henry the Navigator (1394.E.) was the son of King Joao of Portugal. Henry organized and financed many sea expeditions. His most famous were in search of a sea route to the rich spice trade of the Indies and along the way to explore the west coast of Africa.

Prince Henry encountered much difficulty in persuading his captains to sail beyond Cape Bojador in the southern Sahara. They believed the legend that only the "Green Sea of Darkness" existed beyond this point. They thought the sun was so close to the Earth that a person's skin would turn black. The sea boiled. Ships would catch on fire. Hidden monsters lurked, waiting to smash the ships and eat their crews!

On the first attempt Henry sent his ships with orders to keep close to the coastline. A couple of weeks after they left, they returned to Portugal. Their captains told the prince they could not find a sea route to India because they had come to the "end of the world." Henry sent out thirteen more ships, and each one came back with the same story. From our armchair in history it is easy to see how askew that worldview was. It depended on prejudices that few thought about or were willing to change in the face of evidence.

The English word "worldview" comes from the German word weltanschauung, which means a "look onto the world." The term originally was used to refer to a common concept of reality shared by a particular group of people who were generally bound by culture or ethnicity. The word has been expanded over time to reflect how an individual views the world and interacts within it.

On the fourteenth voyagecommissioned by Prince Henry, the ship was blown off course, and the crew could no longer see the African coastline. The captain pointed his ship's bow east and a few days later came upon Africa again, surprised that his ship had somehow bypassed the Green Sea of Darkness.

But a few years later the captain re-discovered his worst fear. He had announced a sea route to India. Now as he sailed south along the Spanish Sahara, he came to a major rock shoal. On the approach the water became shallower and shallower. Strange currents began to develop. The captain and crew were positive that the end of the world they had missed earlier was now about to destroy them.

Undoubtedly that is how they felt. The limits of their ability to discover had nothing to do with their bravery or their goodness, nor was it charted on any accurate map of the world. Rather, the limits were mapped unconsciously by what they had subjectively envisioned-their worldview.

Why is worldview important in business? Because people of faith will approach all of their endeavors with grains of objective truth. Whatever those grains may be, they are going to be washed, sieved and filtered through subjective and unconscious ways of comprehending, acting and explaining. Some grains will be overlooked, forgotten or thrown away as inconvenient. Hence, like the Portuguese sailors of Prince Henry's day, the modern businessperson's religious worldview provides a mental map of how to conduct business.

Table of Contents

PART ONE: FOREWORD
A WORD TO THE READER
1. THE DILEMMA
Prince Henry the Navigator
Religion
Business Ethics
References and Further Reading

PART TWO: RELIGIONS ORIGINATING IN
CHINA AND JAPAN
2. CONFUCIANISM
History
Sacred Texts
Selected Readings
Core Beliefs
Branches of Confucianism
Confucianism in the Marketplace
References and Further Reading

3. SHINTOISM
History
Sacred Texts
Selected Readings
Core Beliefs
Branches of Shintoism
Shintoism in the Marketplace
References and Further Reading

PART THREE: RELIGIONS ORIGINATING IN
INDIA
4. BUDDHISM
History
Sacred Texts
Selected Readings
Core Beliefs
Branches of Buddhism
Buddhism in the Marketplace
References and Further Reading

5. HINDUISM
History
Sacred Texts
Selected Readings
Core Beliefs
Branches of Hinduism
Hinduism in the Marketplace
References and Further Reading

6. SIKHISM
History
Sacred Texts
Selected Readings
Core Beliefs
Branches of Sikhism
Sikhism in the Marketplace
References and Further Reading

PART FOUR: RELIGIONS ORIGINATING IN
THE MIDDLE EAST
7. CHRISTIANITY
History
Sacred Texts
Selected Readings
Core Beliefs
Branches of Christianity
Christianity in the Marketplace
References and Further Reading

8. ISLAM
History
Sacred Texts
Selected Readings
Core Beliefs
Branches of Islam
Islam in the Marketplace
References and Further Reading

9. JUDAISM
History
Sacred Texts
Selected Readings
Core Beliefs
Branches ofJudaism
Judaism in the Marketplace
References and Further Reading

PART FIVE: RELIGIONS ORIGINATING IN
SECULAR POSTMODERNISM
10. SECULAR POSTMODERNISM
History
Sacred Texts
Selected Readings
Core Beliefs
Branches of Secular Postmodernism
Secular Postmodernism in the Marketplace
References and Further Reading

PART SIX: EPILOGUE
11. AFTERWORD
INDEX
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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The Gods of Business: The Intersection of Faith and the Marketplace 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this book to learn more about the different world religions.  It is a quick, easy and fun read that helped me accomplish this.  I thought it was objective although the author certainly shows his dislike for post-modernism.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am fourth generation Mexican-American living in the San Diego area. I am also a practicing Roman Catholic. I have many friends who are not Catholic nor Latino and I generally get along with them and everybody regardless of race or religion. I have a new boss who is a recent immigrant from Asia. He is devoutly Buddhist. I have found it so difficult to work for him our values are so diferent and that plays out everday at work. I shared this problem with some friends in a Book Club that I am member of. One of them had heard about this book, The Gods of Business, from the internet book database. I was able to buy a copy, even though it says it isn¿t available for a few more weeks. In the Preface, what author Albertson calls A Word to the Reader, he writes ¿This book will frustrate some because I don¿t spoon-feed the reader, as if you were unable to draw a conclusion for yourself.¿ I read this statement and filed it away somewhere in my mind. By the fourth chapter, I was becoming frustrated because I wasn¿t being told what to think. I was expecting Dr. Phil, telling me what to think, feel, and believe about religion and business ethics. I then remembered the previous statement in the Preface that Albertson wasn¿t going to be doing this and was forcing me to draw my own conclusions. It made me think long and hard about what I was reading and about the situation with my boss. I liked this a lot book because I was being treated with intellectual respect and dignity. After experiencing this, why would I want a Dr. Phil moment as this was so much better! This book helped me understand where my boss was coming from and how to deal with him better. I like this book so much that I¿ve bought multiple copies to give away to a few co-workers and my boss and I highly recommend!
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