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The Gooch Machine: Poems for Children to Perform
     

The Gooch Machine: Poems for Children to Perform

by Brod Bagert, Tim Ellis (Illustrator)
 

Here is a collection of whimsical poems, where kids take on life with sincerity and humor. These poems are fun to read, but they are even more fun to perform. Brod Bagert's infectious energy and Tim Ellis's spirited illustrations will inspire you to act out these poems and bring them to life.

Overview


Here is a collection of whimsical poems, where kids take on life with sincerity and humor. These poems are fun to read, but they are even more fun to perform. Brod Bagert's infectious energy and Tim Ellis's spirited illustrations will inspire you to act out these poems and bring them to life.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
Brod Bagert has the zeal of a preacher and the passion of an orator when he demonstrates how children should perform poetry. His humorous poems for children's voices are the ideal vehicle to help children interpret poetry. They are short, funny, often outrageous and easy to learn. His other books include Let Me Be...The Boss, Chicken Socks and Elephant Games. Adults can profit from Bagert's philosophy: Smile! Be enthusiastic! Have Fun!
Children's Literature - 7 to 10,
Designed to "help broaden the number of children who experience poetry in their lives," this book of 21 poems is meant to be read aloud with "lots of expression." With funny, cartoon-like illustrations, the book tackles some of childhood's greatest worries and joys like addition, homework, mean teachers, sisters, role models and rock and roll. Most of the poems are short and lend themselves to acting out in front of the class.
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4The subject matter of Bagert's 19 poems (grouchy teachers, homework, procrastination, etc.) has child appeal, but the quality of the writing varies a great deal. "Alien Eyes?" perfectly captures a youngster's questioning about the possible existence of other inhabitants in our universe: on the opposite page, however, is "Countdown Jitters," a juvenile description of space rocket takeoffs that falls flat. The author states in a brief introductory note that his poems are meant to be acted out, but even the most expressive voice and actions won't lift some of these poems above the mediocre. Detailed, highly colored watercolor-and-marker illustrations leave little to readers' imaginations and lack depth and subtlety. Some border on the grotesque. Compare these often-garish illustrations to the wonderful pen-and-ink drawings by James Stevenson in Jack Prelutsky's New Kid on the Block (1984) and Something Big Has Been Here (1990, both Greenwillow). These collections are for the same audience but consistently amuse while the illustrations allow readers to create their own mind images.Barbara McGinn, Oak Hill Elementary School, Severna Park, MD
Kirkus Reviews
In these "Poems for Children to Perform," young readers may first elect to scratch their heads: "Alien Eyes?" is about looking into another planet's sky; "The Homework Guarantee" covers procrastination; and "Butterfly Fire" trumpets something about "the flame of poet-fire/When it burns in children's eyes." Budding dramatists can take hints from the chubby-face children who cavort through Ellis's sprawling cartoon scenes; these are usually light in mood, although the image of a man sweating over his taxes is a dismal take on "Dad's Greatest Fear"—"that someday/I'll grow up just like him." Bagert's occasional proficiency, as in "The Food Cheer"—"Carnivores! Carnivores!/We eat meat!/Herbivores! Herbivores!/Plants taste sweet!"—doesn't alter lesser, more pedestrian fare; next to books such as Jean Marzollo's Pretend You're A Cat (1990), the acting-out potential seems indirect at best.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590783153
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
08/01/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author


Brod Bagert and Tim Ellis have collaborated on Let Me Be the Boss, Chicken Socks, and Elephant Games. Mr. Bagert lives in New Orleans. Mr. Ellis lives in Troy, Michigan.

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