The Good Luck of Right Now

The Good Luck of Right Now

by Matthew Quick
3.9 53

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The Good Luck of Right Now 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 53 reviews.
L875 More than 1 year ago
Five is just not enough stars. This book made me decide that I will read everything this author writes. I loved it. It is written in the form of letters to Richard Gere and I didn't really know what to make of it at first. The best way I can explain it is that the book asks why some people live glossy, beautiful lives and some people live lives where horror is an every day or at least frequent visitor. Through the letters, Bartholomew is reaching from his end of the spectrum to the other side. Are the kindnesses and grand gestures of celebrities any different than the kindnesses and grand gestures of the uncelebrated? This book shows that yes, of course they are. Matthew Quick has a special sensitivity for the mentally ill and the misfits of the world. He had it in Silver Linings Playbook and he has it here too. I love that. I work in a library so I appreciated the library references and he has a great sense of humor. Loved the "default platitude" of the grief counselor as Bartholomew described it. It's a small thing but you'll have to read it to find it. Awesome book. I have to thank Goodreads for the early copy of this one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I saw some mixed reviews about this book but I loved it. All of the quirky characters trying to search for meaning in their difficult lives. You trully care about them and their happiness.
RobertDowns More than 1 year ago
I should have written Richard Gere more letters. Heck, I should have written him one letter. One long diatribe where I offered up all of my feelings and emotions, thoughts on the Chinese government and Tibet, and all the women who have entered my life and then exited en masse, telling my story in a series of letters over a period of months or maybe it was years (I forgot), but if my source of inspiration for writing said letters is rifling through my mom’s underwear drawer, I’m glad I completely missed that memo. If you like quirky characters that have a penchant for four-letter words, a woman who may be emotionally available through the aid of multiple therapy sessions, and a man who at thirty-eight years of age has no idea how to live without his mother, then sister have I got the story for you. You may want to sit down for this one, and read it while under the influence of prescription medication, otherwise you might smile at inopportune moments, like your neighbor’s funeral, or the sendoff of your favorite goldfish. If Matthew Quick in any way resembles his characters, then he has more than a few quirks, and from my previous experience with playing in my own sandbox, there’s nothing wrong with a few idiosyncrasies. In fact, life hands you a Benjamin Franklin every time you come up with wonderfully original ones. If you don’t believe me, just ask Bartholomew Neil, or maybe you’re better off speaking with Matthew Quick. Either way, just make sure you wash your hands first. THE GOOD LUCK OF RIGHT NOW had me galloping toward the finish with my hands up in the air. Without too much effort, I can safely say my enjoyment reached both hands, and then my brain, as I waited with bated breath for what I might discover within the confines of the next letter. If I were to dangle out on a limb in the middle of a windstorm, I might even call it inspiring. But that’s the kind of deduction you should make on your own, while not under the influence of prescription medication. Robert Downs Author of Falling Immortality: Casey Holden, Private Investigator
BobWard More than 1 year ago
I picked this book because I loved Silver Linings, both the book AND the film, and Quick wrote both books. So, is Good Luck as good as Silver Linings? Very close. It has characters who are dysfunctional, but are lovable and have depth; starting in low places but with an upbeat trajectory. An interesting premise as the protagonist writes a collection of letters (diary-style) to actor Richard Gere. It is being made into a film and I DO hope they have Mr. Gere do a cameo after the credits. He is not in the book. Yes, the book is well worth reading.
jdLA More than 1 year ago
Great book. Interesting concept and well done. I loved Silver Linings Playbook and this was even better. Very enjoyable read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
funny and entertaining
Jayvee_27Misfit More than 1 year ago
A story of a man writing letters to Richard Gere? Interesting indeed. At first, I couldn't help but get confused why exactly would Bartholomew Neil want to write to Richard Gere? Maybe this thought lasted for just the first page. I got the idea that it was his form of coping up, something that no one would understand. Richard Gere, in this novel, seems very approachable, even in the thoughts of one man The novel is heart-warming. Queer and heart-warming. Each character is built up on struggle. Never did the story focused on Bartholomew and his ways of dealing with the world without his mother, but also of the people surrounding him; those he interacts with and those he actually cares about. People might think that patching things such as character build-ups are easy, but with this novel, it just shows how easy the flow of interactions are between the characters. What I love about the characterizations most of all was the pain they all suffered, though in different forms. I am such a sucker for psychologically injured characters. Somehow like his characters in Silver Linings Playbook, all suffering from something around psychological to emotional trauma, Matthew Quick digs deep into this kind of subject matter, though I've only quite witnessed it with these two novels. I have the rest of his novels and have yet to start with them. The consequences of school and book blogging. I will try my hardest. Anyway, back to the topic, The Good Luck of Right Now is an interesting book that not only touches the subject on relationships but also how philosophies from those in the Buddhist teachings and even from Bartholomew's mom, shape his character. The Good Luck of Right Now, as a mantra, is something that I might carry with me until I die. It's simple, not complex with the additions of books on Philosophy and whatnot. Just a simple, humble teaching that states, (in my own words), If bad things happen to you, someone out there receives the wonderful blessing that you didn't get in that exact moment. You might have gotten robbed but somewhere in the streets of Haiti, relief goods are being shipped to hungry children, that sort of thing. Though at first, I was quite skeptical about it. I mean, I guess the reason it's called The Good Luck of Right Now, is that, it is never for you to take in that very moment and that it is never meant for the person who understands. I don't know. That's how I clearly understood it. I guess, perspectives towards this book will play a major role on what exactly others would think of it. As I stated, characters are bizarre, queer and out of it. Aliens? Yes. You may encounter some at this book. Characters like Max, The Girlbrarian and of course, sweet old Father McNamee, Matthew Quick's writing style is easy on the eyes, not hard to comprehend though you might be taken into a certain scenario into another like a whirlwind. That, I wasn't really a fan of. But nonetheless, this is a fascinating book to read, with surprises and interesting plot lines and as I've said, characters that you will all love. I sincerely recommend this book for those who wish to read an odd, light read. It is perfect to be read on a lazy afternoon. I also think that Young Adult novel fans should read this as well. It can give a lot of grounds to think of different writers' perspective on things.I seriously suggest you don't limit your scope on YA... Just suggesting Misfit Booknerds. Anyway, much love to Matthew Quick and his new novel! I hope you guys can check it out! 
Twink More than 1 year ago
Matthew Quick's last novel The Silver Linings Playbook was turned into an award winning movie. His newest book The Good Luck of Right Now gives us another wounded protagonist to root for. Bartholomew Neil is nearing forty when his mother dies from cancer. Having never held a job, lived on his own and with no friends, he is unsure of what to do next. He starts to puzzle things out in letters written to actor Richard Gere. (Mom's favourite) These missives are heartbreaking in their honesty. " I get sidetracked easily by interesting things, and for this reason, people often find it hard to converse with me, which is why I don't talk very much to strangers and much prefer writing letters, in which there is room to record everything, unlike real-life conversations where you have to fight and fight to fit in your words and almost always lose." Bartholomew and his mother were faithful church goers and he does find some solace from parish priest Father McNamee. But he's not too sure about his grief counsellor Wendy, although they do set a life goal for Bartholomew - to have a drink with a friend in a bar. What Bartholomew would really like to do is meet the Girlbrarian at the library he frequents every day. Bartholomew is a great believer of Synchronicity by Carl Jung. Some might call it coincidence or destiny. Bartholomew's mother had her own twist on it - "For every bad thing that happens, a good thing happens too - and this was how the world stayed in harmony." Whatever way you choose to look at it - Bartholomew's life seems to be full of coincidences that may help him find his place in the world. Quick has written another great book full of decidedly quirky characters and odd situations. I'm not sure why, but I am drawn to characters that are outside of the mainstream view of life. Their struggle to fit in and find a place for themselves. Most of all, it is their optimism, their steady one foot in front of the other, their acceptance of everyone that appeals to me. Bartholomew embodies all that. As he says..."Well, if there weren't weird, strange and unusual people who did weird things or nothing at all, there couldn't be normal people who do normal useful things, right?" The Good Luck of right now is an unusual narrative told from a decidedly different character - one that you shouldn't spend too much time analyzing or trying to fit into a mold. The situations and connections are just as different - but who's to say they couldn't happen? Just go with it - and see where Bartholomew ends up. I quite enjoyed The Good Luck of Right Now - maybe it was meant to land in my mailbox?! (PS There's one scene in the library involving a patron viewing questionable material - I was laughing out loud. As a employee of a public library, I can tell that Quick did not exaggerate this scene!)
Anonymous 5 months ago
Ok, the narrator is a person of limited mental and social skills, and approaches the world in a hesitant manner. Yet at the end of the story he reports that he, who has never held a job before, has been promoted to manager at Wendy's. The author owes an apology to every store manager everywhere, for implying that such jobs require low intelligence! Enjoyed the book up until that misstep.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved it - weird, puzzling and curious and then in retrospect, spiritual, loving and so believable.
me2nc More than 1 year ago
Quirky. That's the best word I can come up with for this book. It's definitely different, not your typical read, which is what kept me going. It was refreshing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very hard to follow at first. Once it got further in it got interesting and ended.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was written from an interesting perspective (letters to Richard Gere) and included lists of character insight as well as historical/current perspectives on Tibet/China.  That being said, I thought it was too predictable uncovering Bartholemew's biological father and was not at all appreciative of Max's expletives.  I thought it took away too much from the story when I skipped over so much of his character' s dialogue due to the repetitious "f..." words. Tonight Silver Linings  was so, so much better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An unusual story and point of view, but somewhat repetetive and meandering. Not a bad read.
JustLight More than 1 year ago
Loved this novel! The narrative is through the eyes of a "special" individual dealing with the loss of his mother who he's always been devoted to and lived with. Through a process of synchronicity, he meets various individuals who all play an intrinsic role in his growing and healing. A delightful read with surprises and some playoffs. I've spent 20 times what I paid for this novel, and some of my reads were not so near entertaining.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bad book
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Loved it. Fell in love with the "fat, bald, ugly" hero. :)
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