The Grammar of Names in Anglo-Saxon England: The Linguistics and Culture of the Old English Onomasticon

The Grammar of Names in Anglo-Saxon England: The Linguistics and Culture of the Old English Onomasticon

by Fran Colman

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Overview

The Grammar of Names in Anglo-Saxon England: The Linguistics and Culture of the Old English Onomasticon by Fran Colman

This book examines personal names, including given and acquired (or nick-) names, and how they were used in Anglo-Saxon England. It discusses their etymologies, semantics, and grammatical behaviour, and considers their evolving place in Anglo-Saxon history and culture. From that culture survive thousands of names on coins, in manuscripts, on stone and other inscriptions. Names are important and their absence a stigma (Grendel's parents have no names); they may have particular functions in ritual and magic; they mark individuals, generally people but also beings with close human contact such as dogs, cats, birds, and horses; and they may provide indications of rank and gender.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780198701675
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Publication date: 09/30/2014
Pages: 384
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.40(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Retired as Reader in English Language at the University of Edinburgh in 2002, Fran Colman continues to research and lecture on the structure and history of the English language, notably on the names and coinage of Anglo-Saxon England. She has been an invited lecturer at universities and learned societies in Australia, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Poland, Scotland, Spain. Her previous publications include Money Talks: Reconstructing Old English (de Gruyter Mouton, 1992), Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles: Royal Coin Cabinet Stockholm. Part V: Anglo-Saxon Coins: Edward the Confessor and Harold II, 1042-1066 (published for the British Academy by OUP and Spink and Son Ltd., 2007) and, as editor, Evidence for Old English (John Donald, 1992).

Table of Contents

1. Introduction
Part I: On Names
2. Names as words
3. Names are not nouns
4. A name is a name
Part II: Towards the Old English Onomasticon
5. Old English personal-name formation
6. General lexical formation
7. Structures of Old English personal names
8. On the role of the paradigm as a marker of lexical formation
9. An Old English onomasticon

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