The Heartbreak Messenger

The Heartbreak Messenger

by Alexander Vance
3.7 6

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Overview

The Heartbreak Messenger by Alexander Vance

Breaking up is hard to do—so why not pay someone to do it for you?

Twelve-year-old Quentin never asked to be the Heartbreak Messenger. It just kind of happened, and he can't let a golden opportunity pass him by. The valuable communication service he offers is simple: He delivers breakup messages. For a small fee, he will deliver that message to your soon-to-be ex. If you order the deluxe package, he'll even throw in some flowers and a box of chocolates. You know . . . to soften the blow.

At first, Quentin's entrepreneurial brainchild is surprisingly successful, which is great, because he suspects his mom, who works as a car mechanic, is worried about money. But as he interacts with clients, message recipients, and his best friend, Abigail, it doesn't take long for him to wonder if his own heart will remain intact. In The Heartbreak Messenger by Alexander Vance, Quentin discovers that the game of love and the emotions that go with it are as complicated as they come—even for an almost-innocent bystander.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781250042439
Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
Publication date: 07/23/2013
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 608,386
File size: 617 KB
Age Range: 10 - 13 Years

About the Author

Alexander Vance works as a film and video editor. The Heartbreak Messenger is his fiction debut. He lives in Upstate New York with his family.

Customer Reviews

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The Heartbreak Messenger 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love it
PrettyInFiction More than 1 year ago
The Heartbreak Messenger by Alexander Vance took me by surprise. I expected it to be a cute, quick read. What I didn't expect was to stay up much too late because I just couldn't put the book down. I don't usually read middle grade novels, but since this one seemed on the cusp of young adult I gave it a shot, and I'm so glad I did. One thing that made The Heartbreak Messenger stand out for me was the solid business strategies of thirteen year old Quentin. Seriously. This kid could be one of the sharks on Shark Tank when he's older. He's desperate for cash and is willing to work for it, but not to the point of doing anything illegal. Although his business does push some moral boundaries and he knows it. But what does he care? He's thirteen and raking in dough to help his single mom pay the rent. To heck with moral boundaries. Quentin does feel guilty about breaking people's hearts though, and that's part of what makes him so lovable. Alexander Vance sort of nails the standard young boy coming of age story. And Quentin's voice is perfection. Sometimes the cutesy cussing (e.g. "kicked my trash" instead of... well, you know) seemed a little forced, but it fit perfectly with the characters personalities, so I'm not complaining. I'd even go as far as to say this reminded me a little of Flipped by Wendelin Van Draanen, one of my all time favorite coming of age stories. It had the same innocence that Flipped had, and the same agelessness. The story takes place in the present, but it could have easily taken place in any decade. The Heartbreak Messenger is great for younger readers, with its lovable, yet clueless narrator and the way he transitions from being—in his words—"too young" to think about girls as anything but best friends to maybe, possibly, seeing them as something more. And it's great for adult readers, too. It had me smiling the whole way through. And occasionally rolling my eyes at how little Quentin understood about girls.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MI_Reader More than 1 year ago
I feel the age range for this book is 12+, thus the dilemma is it middle grade or YA? And more so for the boy/girl relationships. I don't think the average 3rd or 4th grader has the knowledge base to understand broken hearts and "breaking up". Either way, it is a fantastic book. Quentin is a fun twelve-year-old, but also pretty mature for his age, at least in some aspects of his life. Since his dad's been gone for years, he's become the man of the house and has more responsibilities than your average 7th grader. Even so, he doesn't always make the right decisions, but you can't help but root for him anyway. As he gets deeper into his business of being the Heartbreak Messenger, he soon realizes that love isn't just a game and emotions can cause people to do crazy things. Girls and boys will both appreciate this book, and may even learn a thing or two about girl/boy relationships.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I also know alot about breaking up because I have actually dumped a guy for cheating on me.