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The Heraclidae: Greek Classics with Critical and Explanatory Notes
     

The Heraclidae: Greek Classics with Critical and Explanatory Notes

by Euripides, Theodore Alois Buckley (Translator)
 
The Heraclidae - Complete Greek Classics - The Heraclidae From 'The Tragedies of Euripides' - Euripides - With Critical and Explanatory Notes - Complete New Edition.

Literally Translated By Theodore Alois Buckley

Greek Classics with Critical and Explanatory Notes

Classic Greek Drama

Iolaus, son of Iphiclus, and nephew of Hercules, whom he had joined in his

Overview

The Heraclidae - Complete Greek Classics - The Heraclidae From 'The Tragedies of Euripides' - Euripides - With Critical and Explanatory Notes - Complete New Edition.

Literally Translated By Theodore Alois Buckley

Greek Classics with Critical and Explanatory Notes

Classic Greek Drama

Iolaus, son of Iphiclus, and nephew of Hercules, whom he had joined in his expeditions during his youth, in his old age protected his sons. For the sons of Hercules having been driven out of every part of Greece by Eurystheus, he came with them to Athens; and, embracing the altars of the Gods, was safe, Demophoon being king of the city; and when Copreus, the herald of Eurystheus, wished to remove the suppliants, he prevented him. Upon this he departed, threatening war. Demophoon despised him; but hearing the oracles promise him victory if he sacrificed the most noble Athenian virgin to Ceres, he was grieved; not wishing to slay either his own daughter, or that of any citizen, for the sake of the suppliants. But Macaria, one of the daughters of Hercules, hearing of the prediction, willingly devoted herself. They honored her for her noble death, and, knowing that their enemies were at hand, went forth to battle. The play ends with their victory, and the capture of Eurystheus.

Euripides (c. 480 - 406 BC) was one of the three great tragedians of classical Athens, the other two being Aeschylus and Sophocles. Some ancient scholars attributed ninety-five plays to him but according to the Suda it was ninety-two at most. Of these, eighteen or nineteen have survived complete (there has been debate about his authorship of Rhesus, largely on stylistic grounds) and there are also fragments, some substantial, of most of the other plays. More of his plays have survived intact than those of Aeschylus and Sophocles together, partly due to mere chance and partly because his popularity grew as theirs declined-he became, in the Hellenistic Age, a cornerstone of ancient literary education, along with Homer, Demosthenes and Menander.

Euripides is identified with theatrical innovations that have profoundly influenced drama down to modern times, especially in the representation of traditional, mythical heroes as ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances. This new approach led him to pioneer developments that later writers adapted to comedy, some of which are characteristic of romance. Yet he also became "the most tragic of poets", focusing on the inner lives and motives of his characters in a way previously unknown. He was "the creator of...that cage which is the theatre of Shakespeare's Othello, Racine's Phèdre, of Ibsen and Strindberg," in which "...imprisoned men and women destroy each other by the intensity of their loves and hates", and yet he was also the literary ancestor of comic dramatists as diverse as Menander and George Bernard Shaw.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781495350757
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
01/27/2014
Pages:
34
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.07(d)

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