The Hidden Treasure of Dutch Buffalo Creek

The Hidden Treasure of Dutch Buffalo Creek

by Jackson Badgenoone

Paperback

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781460267356
Publisher: FriesenPress
Publication date: 02/14/2018
Pages: 344
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.77(d)

About the Author

Jackson Badgenoone emerges from the wind and clouds, whispering to the thoughts of her extended family. As one of the Neverborn, she has borne witness to the lives of specific individuals for countless years, acting as a faithful recorder of events and significant moments. The Hidden Treasure of Dutch Buffalo Creek is one of many books which she has penned alongside her kindred Neverborn spirits. She is an avid researcher and ghostwriter, and continues to document the high water markers of her beloved clan to this very day. Learn more about the author at www.hiddentreasurenovels.com....

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The Hidden Treasure of Dutch Buffalo Creek 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
ColleenHR More than 1 year ago
The structure of The Hidden Treasure of Dutch Buffalo Creek reminds me of the movie Her. Reminiscent of a computer operating system that assumes life in that movie, Neverborn ghost writers become entwined in the plot of this novel. As the narrative unfolds, the ghost writers assume an identity as Badge-no-one, a play on words reminder that they were never born. And yet they dialogue with each other and with ten characters they are assigned to observe. The story unfolds when the principal character finds a bayonet buried in the creek bed. In an attempt to describe the purpose of the blade, the lead narrator selects sanitized chapters from each of ten books. This inventive construction demanded my full attention. My book club was energized by questions posed in a fantastical final chapter. History and science fiction meet memoir punctuated by a spiritual message without becoming didactic. The book is a fun read, one that brought me back for a second sitting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Hidden Treasure of Dutch Buffalo Creek is the first novel in a projected series by Jackson Badgenoone. Blending aspects of historical fiction, fantasy, biography, and archival studies, the book pulls together excerpts from the life stories of its characters, as narrated by literal ghostwriters. The novel opens in present-day North Carolina with an older man named James finding a bayonet dating back to the War for American Independence. James, sometimes nicknamed Traveler or Trav, hears a female spiritual guide named Jackson telling him to look beyond physical relics. Dreams and memories help him relive highlights from his life. Jackson leads him to a hope chest filled with volumes that she and her coterie of “Neverborn” ghostwriters have authored. Each book pinpoints “high water markers” in the “extraordinary ordinary life” stories of the characters, including James’s wife, Mimi, and his father, a military career officer. The “Neverborn” concept seems to be based on arcane scriptural exegesis. Each never-born soul results from a miscarriage, stillbirth, or abortion. Not quite angels or ghosts, the spirits still have a presence in the physical world. In the novel’s slightly fantastical setup, they function as onlookers who craft the life stories of those they observe. Jackson supervises her nine namesakes, all linked by a common last name, Badgenoone (from “Badge Number One,” but also a play on “no one”). The figures’ origins and identities remain rather murky, but James is a strong central character whose memories from the 1950s through the present give a sense of history’s sweep. Vivid descriptive language enlivens the settings, whether at home (“Songbirds would provide a perfect serenade under a Carolina blue sky”) or in Europe (“cathedrals and castles inspired awe. Horse-drawn carts announced their travel along cobblestone streets”). Although well written, the book as a whole is an unusual amalgam of spiritualism, historical nostalgia, and technology. The author aims to turn physical volumes in a treasure chest into an interactive reading experience and virtual archive. The metafictional, intertextual approach—inserting chapters from other books in the series and discussing the composition process—is certainly inventive, but involves tedious lists of books, headlines, and names, as well as bracketed asides that distract from the central story. James’s story might have been better told as a simple coming-of-age novel with flashbacks, thereby avoiding supernatural and narrative complications with more cohesive results. The mystical aspect may be unconvincing, but this is still a creative mixture of historical fiction and fantasy with potential appeal for fans of David Mitchell and Kate Atkinson. I have recived this book from bookcrash.com for my honest review. Thankyou.