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The House of Belgrade
     

The House of Belgrade

5.0 1
by Borislav Pekic, Ian Johnson (Translator)
 

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The Houses of Belgrade, first published in 1970, draws a parallel between the unrest culminating in the Belgrade student riots of 1968 and that at two earlier points in the history of Yugoslavia: the riots which preceded Germany's 1941 attack on Belgrade and the turmoil of Serbia's entry into WWI. Pekic relates his tale through Negovan, one of Belgrade's

Overview

The Houses of Belgrade, first published in 1970, draws a parallel between the unrest culminating in the Belgrade student riots of 1968 and that at two earlier points in the history of Yugoslavia: the riots which preceded Germany's 1941 attack on Belgrade and the turmoil of Serbia's entry into WWI. Pekic relates his tale through Negovan, one of Belgrade's prime builders of houses, and through the metaphor of the gradual decline of the builder's mind presents a compelling look at the fear of loss and destruction in a chronically disrupted society.

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Booknews
The Bernard Johnson translation of Pekic's prize-winning novel. Originally published by Harcourt in 1978. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780151421831
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/01/1978
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
212

What People are Saying About This

Ronelle Alexander
"It is more important now than ever that the West hear the voices of intelligent writers from the lands of the former Yugoslavia. Borislav Pekic is a writer of great forcefulness and power."

Meet the Author

Borislav Pekic was born in 1930 in Podgorica, Yugoslavia. Arrested in 1948 for terrorism, armed rebellion, and espionage after the theft of a few typewriters and mimeographs, Pekiƒ spent five years in prison, where he began to write. He worked as a screenwriter and editor of a literary journal before publishing his first novel at age thirty-five. Constant trouble with the authorities led him to emigrate to London in the early 1970s. His novels include The Houses of Belgrade (1994) and The Time of Miracles (1994), both published by Northwestern University Press. He died of cancer in 1992 in London.

Stephen M. Dickey is an assistant professor of Slavic linguistics at the University of Virginia. He co-translated Mesa Selimoviƒ's Death and the Dervish (Northwestern, 1996).
Bogdan Rakic is a visiting associate professor of Slavic Literature at Indiana University. He co-translated Mesa Selimoviƒ's Death and the Dervish (Northwestern, 1996) and edited In a Foreign Harbor (Slavica, 2000). He is currently working on Borislav Pekiƒ's literary biography.

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The House of Belgrade 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Uttery exeptional. Would recommend with all my heart!