The House of the Seven Gables

The House of the Seven Gables

by Nathaniel Hawthorne
The House of the Seven Gables

The House of the Seven Gables

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

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Overview

“The notes and the annotations in this and other Norton volumes most influence my decision in choosing this text. I thought the volume excellent. My students commented that it was very helpful.” —MARGARET MURRAY, Western Connecticut State University

This Norton Critical Edition includes:

  • The first edition of the novel, published in 1851 by Ticknor, Reed, and Fields.
  • Robert S. Levine’s insightful introduction, revised headnotes, expanded explanatory footnotes, and note on the text and annotations.
  • A generous selection of carefully chosen primary materials—three of them new to the Second Edition—intended to provide readers with essential backgrounds on the novel’s major themes.
  • An extensive selection of critical responses to The House of the Seven Gables from the time of its publication to the present day, including eight new to the Second Edition.
  • A chronology of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s life and work and a selected bibliography.

 

About the Series

 Read by more than 12 million students over fifty-five years, Norton Critical Editions set the standard for apparatus that is right for undergraduate readers. The three-part format—annotated text, contexts, and criticism—helps students to better understand, analyze, and appreciate the literature, while opening a wide range of teaching possibilities for instructors. Whether in print or in digital format, Norton Critical Editions provide all the resources students need.



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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781458331250
Publisher: Lulu.com
Publication date: 03/20/2022
Pages: 210
Product dimensions: 5.83(w) x 8.27(h) x 0.48(d)

About the Author

Robert S. Levine (Ph.D. Stanford; General Editor and Editor, 1820–1865) is Distinguished University Professor of English and Distinguished Scholar-Teacher at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Conspiracy and Romance: Studies in Brockden Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Melville; Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, and the Politics of Representative Identity; Dislocating Race and Nation: Episodes in Nineteenth-Century American Literary Nationalism; The Lives of Frederick Douglas; Race, Transnationalism, and Nineteenth-Century American Literary Studies; and (upcoming from Norton) The Failed Promise: Reconstruction, Frederick Douglass, and the Impeachment of Andrew Johnson. He has edited a number of books, including The New Cambridge Companion to Herman Melville and Norton Critical Editions of Hawthorne’s The House of the Seven Gables and Melville’s Pierre. Levine has received fellowships from the NEH and the Guggenheim Foundation. In 2014 the American Literature Section of the MLA awarded him the Hubbell Medal for Lifetime Achievement in American Literary Studies.

Date of Birth:

July 4, 1804

Date of Death:

May 19, 1864

Place of Birth:

Salem, Massachusetts

Place of Death:

Plymouth, New Hampshire

Education:

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, 1824

Read an Excerpt

Half-way down a by-street of one of our New England towns, stands a rusty wooden house, with seven acutely peaked gables facing towards various points of the compass, and a huge, clustered chimney in the midst. The street is Pyncheon-street; the house is the old Pyncheon-house; and an elm-tree, of wide circumference, rooted before the door, is familiar to every town-born child by the title of the Pyncheon-elm. On my occasional visits to the town aforesaid, I seldom failed to turn down Pyncheon-street, for the sake of passing through the shadow of these two antiquities; the great elm-tree and the weather-beaten edifice.
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "The House of the Seven Gables"
by .
Copyright © 2010 Nathaniel Hawthorne.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

  • Introduction to The House of the Seven Gables
  • Textual Introduction: The House of the Seven Gables
  • Note on the Typesetting
  • Preface

  1. The Old Pyncheon Family
  2. The Little Shop-Window
  3. The First Customer
  4. A Day behind the Counter
  5. May and November
  6. Maule's Well
  7. The Guest
  8. The Pyncheon of To-day
  9. Clifford and Phoebe
  10. The Pyncheon-Garden
  11. The Arched Window
  12. The Daguerreotypist
  13. Alice Pyncheon
  14. Phoebe's Good Bye
  15. The Scowl and Smile
  16. Clifford's Chamber
  17. The Flight of Two Owls
  18. Governor Pyncheon
  19. Alice's Posies
  20. The Flower of Eden
  21. The Departure

  • Textual Notes
  • Editorial Emendations in the Copy-Text
  • Rejected First-Edition Substantive Readings
  • Word-Division
  • Historical Collation
  • Alterations in the Manuscript
  • Compositorial Stints in the First Edition
  • The Centenary Texts: Editorial Principles
  • Appendix to the Second Printing

Reading Group Guide

1. Hawthorne considered this novel to be a romance, which in literary terms refers to a narrative, allegorical treatment of heroic, fantastic, or supernatural events. Do you think this term accurately describes the book? Why or why not?

2. What do you make of the relationship between interior consciousness and external appearance in the novel? How does this conflict, as experienced by each of the central characters, inform the novel? And how does the house serve as a metaphor for this struggle?

3. Discuss the theme of class and social structure in the novel. What do you think Hawthorne intends in his depiction of Hepzibah's and Clifford's slow decline, and the curse on the Pyncheons' house? Are these related in any way? What about the role of the Maules?

4. Is the house a kingdom or a prison? Neither, or both? What is the curse that afflicts the Pyncheons? Discuss.

5. Discuss the role played by Holgrave in the novel. How does his nomadic, rootless existence stand in contrast to the Pyncheons? How does his marriage to Phoebe complicate this?

6. Discuss the scene in which Clifford attempts to join the procession. How does this illuminate the fundamental struggle of the Pyncheon family?

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