The House on Mango Street (SparkNotes Literature Guide)

The House on Mango Street (SparkNotes Literature Guide)

by SparkNotes, Sandra Cisneros

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781411475717
Publisher: Spark
Publication date: 08/12/2014
Series: SparkNotes Literature Guide Series
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 80
Sales rank: 488,138
File size: 210 KB

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The House on Mango Street SparkNotes Literature Guide Series) 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book for school, as stated above. I loved it. The best book that school has ever made us read. I love the way the book is written; you have to pay attencion to what is happening and what is going on. The messages are really well explained and clear, but not in an annnoying way. This book would and can be for people around 14 + because there is some topic a middle schooler shouldnt bereading and/or can grasp. I recomend it Read it!
ashley46 More than 1 year ago
House on Mango Street was one of the few books I have actually enjoyed. The reason I enjoyed it as much was because I know someone who can definitely relate to the same situation. Just like Esperanza my friend lives in a poor neighborhood, and her hopes of towards becoming someone in life are down to the floor. So reading this novel has made me understand her way of feeling and the ability to give some advice. The theme of the novel was to stay optimistic through everything in life because the outcome will be worth it. The text was mature up easy enough to read. Life put Esperanza through many test and struggles; it was her decision that counted against her. Of course, Esperanza was a usual teen but she was very mature when I came to making some choices. At the very start of the novel Esperanza thought that living in Mango Street won't benefit her in any possible way. Throughout the novel she noticed that she couldn't really do anything about moving till she was old enough; so it was only Esperanza and her decisions she made. My friend is in the same position Esperanza was in the beginning of the story, unfortunately she has still not noticed that she has to stay positive and have lots of hope to succeed. Reading this book has made me give her lots of advice; at the moment she is reading the book and so should you.
Damarrion More than 1 year ago
The House On Mango Street, a beautiful work of art made by Sandra Cisneros interesting piece created with a perfect mixture of comedy, and real life stuff. I’d honestly recommend this book to anyone. From a small child to a mid adult this book can be read by. anyone. A book about a little girl who becomes a young woman, this book has a personal, and detailed description of Esperanza Cordero’s (The main character/ Narrator) life. From her many difficult experiences in the low-income Latino neighborhood in Chicago. One will be able to step in her shoes as she progresses through her life. She arrived at her house because of a leak that happened at her apartment that the landlord didn't fix. She had high expectations of the house that was crushed when she arrived. She eventually got to love the place. Until she began to mature and her eyes opened to a lot of things that she never saw before. Her own sexuality, poverty, the true intentions of most men with females. She sought to leave the place to become a writer and artist and grow past everything. She wanted to be independent. “One day I will pack my bags of books and paper. One day I will say goodbye to Mango. I am too strong for her to keep me here forever. One day I will go away.” - Esperanza Cordero Like I said before I’d recommend this book to anyone. So you could stand in the shoes of a young hispanic girl who became a grown woman, and understand the mysteries and troubles in her life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Recently, I had the pleasure of reading The House on Mango Street, by Sandra Cisneros. The fictional novel follows the childhood of Esperanza Cordero, a young Latina living in a neighborhood in Chicago. The novel is full of vignettes, each one describing a separate situation that Esperanza goes through. From shamefully eating a rice cake alone in the cantina at her private school, to driving in a stolen car, to being catcalled for wearing heels at a very young age, to having her sister marry in eighth grade, Esperanza’s childhood is a frenzy of forcefully having to mature. For instance, Esperanza struts in heels around the street with two other young girls and is signaled over by a bum. When asked for a kiss, Esperanza is able to avoid the situation. However, when she matures slightly, she is hired at a photography company, and on the first day, makes friends with an old man who says, “it was his birthday and would she please give him a birthday kiss. She thought she would because he was so old and just as she was about to put her lips on his cheek, he grabs her face with both hands and kisses her hard on the mouth and doesn't let go.” Her first kiss is by force, and much of her initiation into mature subjects is done similarly in order to highlight the disturbing truth behind young girls growing up in neighborhoods similar to the one of Mango Street. The novel focuses on Esperanza’s hope, as it is her name, and her desire to live in a house and to “be able to point” at it. She does not want the life that her grandmother received: “she looked out the window her whole life, the way so many women sit their sadness on an elbow… Esperanza. [She had] inherited her name, but [she doesn't] want to inherit her place by the window.” Esperanza is, unfortunately, a very relatable character whose story does not end with the novel; rather, it continues on in modern society, claiming the youth of many other young Latinas. The House on Mango Street is a coming-of-age story that reveals the harsh reality of living as a young Latina in Chicago, as well as other parts of the world. It provides a beautiful, yet grotesque take on many mature subjects, and deserves to be read. I rate this novel 4.5/5 stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book but i feel bad for wsperanza because she was in sort of poverty
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love how the book is writen and the ways the paragraphs are.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its okay not tht good of a book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Most boring book ever had to read it in school recently very little interesting content i read it in just one class period,just a reason to sleep in class after reading it all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Does this have the story in it or is it just notes about it?.
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Brennan MAHONEY More than 1 year ago
Do not read!!!!!!!
Andrew Tran More than 1 year ago
She made friends with a whore who gets her raped PERIOD
Jessica Starr More than 1 year ago
was probably the most boring book ive read in my life so far. so short, yet do many details that make no sense unless they are explained- she was RAPED in red clowns! and then there is the irony of linoleum roses, sally ending up marrying the exact same type of person she was trying to get away from... i know some people may think this book is amazing, but ive talked to over forty people eho said that this book is horrible... just not our type i guess