The Human Beings Are Awoken, You Have Set Them Upright. Body Structure and Conception of Man in Ancient Egyptian Art and the Present Day

The Human Beings Are Awoken, You Have Set Them Upright. Body Structure and Conception of Man in Ancient Egyptian Art and the Present Day

by Hans Georg Brecklinghaus

Paperback

$28.95
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783932803048
Publisher: Lebenshus Verlag
Publication date: 09/27/2002
Pages: 356
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.79(d)

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The Human Beings Are Awoken, You Have Set Them Upright. Body Structure and Conception of Man in Ancient Egyptian Art and the Present Day 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It is hard to describe this book with a few sentences, because it covers a lot of themes: the role of art in Ancient Egypt, the reasons for the special style of representing humans in this old culture, the bodyuse in Egypt's daily life, the religious background of fine art and so forth. Apparently the author, a longtime practitioner of the Rolfing-method of Structural Integration of the human body, started his research with one discovery and a question emerging out of this discovery. The discovery is: The represented postures of humans in Ancient Egyptian art are in congruence with the vision of structural balance and free movement which Rolfing (and other forms of modern somatic therapy/education) holds. The question is: Did the Egyptians had these values too (4000 years ago!)? The author says 'yes' and proves this statement by covering all areas which I mentioned above. Comparing the art of Ancient Egypt with the art of Ancient Greece (and other cultures) the author makes clear, that the self-understanding of the bodily being is different in different cultures and leads to different ways of representing the human body in fine art. This book is not only fascinating for people interested in history (of art) or in Ancient Egypt but also for people who see art as one way to understand oneself. Bridging the old days of Egypt with our modern times the author reveals the meaning of a balanced body structure for the human being consisting of body-soul-spirit. From this point of view the reception of Ancient Egyptian art can be a surprisingly modern self-experience if one is able to feel the somatic qualities of the represented people in oneself. Seldomly enough, authors - being engaged in a specialized field - are able bo connect various aspects of life and science. Hans Georg Brecklinghaus mastered this difficult task in an excellent way.