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The Invisible Thread
     

The Invisible Thread

5.0 2
by Elizabeth Wallace
 
The search for self begins with the loss of self.

The Invisible Thread is a memoir of personal discovery, which will surprise the reader as much as it often surprises the narrator as she unearths events of her early life with a voice of cathartic awareness.

The story begins with a young child who is ripped away from a loving home by her

Overview

The search for self begins with the loss of self.

The Invisible Thread is a memoir of personal discovery, which will surprise the reader as much as it often surprises the narrator as she unearths events of her early life with a voice of cathartic awareness.

The story begins with a young child who is ripped away from a loving home by her biological mother and a mentally ill aunt. As she is driven away, she watches her peaceful life vanish into the distance. Told that her father is dead, they live a life on the lamb, moving ten times in ten years over 4,000 miles. Ensnared in the twists and turns of a disturbing life, she finds herself pitted in a life-and-death struggle, choreographing an impending disaster whose dramatic outcome unwittingly takes her to Ireland and the Invisible Thread of her roots. And this is where the story begins, as the protagonist traverses continents and oceans with a relentless determination that will ultimately reveal the shocking truth.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781432775421
Publisher:
Outskirts Press, Inc.
Publication date:
09/25/2011
Pages:
280
Sales rank:
940,304
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.63(d)

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The Invisible Thread: A Journey Home 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
BarbaraWright More than 1 year ago
I could not put this book down. From the beginning to the end the pages seemed to turn themselves. It's written with such flow that there is nowhere the reader stumbles and decides to read it "later." There is also no doubt that the story is true. How could such a tale be invented? It is true, in this case, that "fact is stranger than fiction." Many lifetimes are lived as this girl (narrating as a middle-aged woman looking backwards in a moment of crisis) moves across the US under the shadow of her estranged mother and the mother's mentally ill sister: 10 times in the first 10 years. They tell her father is dead and the aunt is tauntingly abusive--but not without the justifiable reactions of the troubled youngster. Ironically, trouble acts as a catalyst that brings her to her relatives primitive farm in the remote part of Co. Mayo, Ireland and later to a boarding school in Co. Galway, Ireland. There her life and her perception of it is transformed. She returns to Seattle, and, after several years, convinced that the light of life has to be back in her ancestral home of Ireland, returns as a young adult to serendipitously find guidance through a teacher in the safety of a surrogate family. She triumphs in winning the most prestigious awards for vocal performance in the British Isles and returns to Seattle only to say goodbye. Then the trump card is played as the aunt at the heart of the story reveals the shocking truth. This one is not to be missed!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was recommended through an Amazon discussion group, "Memoir of someone who is not famous." I browsed the "Look Inside" feature, felt drawn in and ordered it the same day. Willa Cather said about memoir, "It isn't so much what happened to the person, but what the person makes of what happened. What the writer becomes." In this story the little girl, Beth, certainly is determined to become! In her early years she is spun like a top with no concern by her caretaker Anna, an unwed mother who gave birth to this first and only child at the age of 45. Certainly her mother struggled with her own inner turmoil (don't we all) but the kid was a fighter who would stop at nothing to save herself. The story literally takes on a new life when Beth feigns an impending disaster that might actually take place if her mother doesn't wake up and see the danger. At age 13 neighborhood boys threaten to rape her. She's one step ahead of them as she contrives in her mind what the result of the trauma will look like: torn, bruised, tattered, shattered. Her mother is so convinced that this actually happened that she does, indeed, wake up and sends her away to a boarding school in Ireland. The descriptions of landscapes, smells, sounds, experiences of immigration and meetings with long lost relatives in the West of Ireland brings a truly life-changing experience of another world. And this is only the beginning. The extremes of desolation, exultation, isolation and integration are so well described and lived in this journey that I can only recommend it very highly indeed.