The Jungle

The Jungle

by Upton Sinclair
3.8 394

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Overview

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

“Practically alone among the American writers of his generation,” wrote Edmund Wilson, “[Sinclair] put to the American public the fundamental questions raised by capitalism in such a way that they could not escape them.” When it was first published in 1906, The Jungle exposed the inhumane conditions of Chicago’s stockyards and the laborer’s struggle against industry and “wage slavery.” It was an immediate bestseller and led to new regulations that forever changed workers’ rights and the meatpacking industry. A direct descendant of Dickens’s Hard Times, it remains the most influential workingman’s novel in American literature.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781613820735
Publisher: Simon & Brown
Publication date: 06/22/2011
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 374
Product dimensions: 0.83(w) x 6.00(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

Upton Sinclair (1878-1968) was born in Baltimore. At age fifteen, he began writing a series of dime novels in order to pay for his education at the City College of New York. He was later accepted to do graduate work at Columbia, and while there he published a number of novels, including The Journal of Arthur Stirling (1903) and Manassas (1904). Sinclair’s breakthrough came in 1906 with the publication of The Jungle, a scathing indictment of the Chicago meat-packing industry. His later works include World’s End (1940), Dragon’s Teeth (1942), which won him a Pulitzer Prize, O Shepherd, Speak! (1949) and Another Pamela (1950).

Ronald Gottesman was born in Boston and earned degrees from the University of Massachusetts and from Colgate and Indiana universities. He has taught literature, film studies, and humanities courses at Northwestern, Indiana, and Rutgers universities, the University of Wisconsin, and the University of Southern California, where for nine years he directed the Center for the Humanities. Founding editor of the Quarterly Review of Film Studies and Humanities in Society, Professor Gottesman was editor and author of many articles and books on literature and film, including three on Upton Sinclair.

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The Jungle 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 394 reviews.
AggieFencer More than 1 year ago
I read this book back when I was in middle school and to this day (starting graduate school soon) it still remains my favorite book of all time. Even though I am a Laissez-faire Capitalist and am not too fond of the last chapter, I am a vegetarian and someone who is going into public service. I still find it interesting that Sinclair's book had to be toned down because if he had described the situation even more accurately, readers wouldn't have been able to keep down their lunches. I love how he tells the story of this immigrant family. The first chapter is a little slow, but it really helps the reader to understand how difficult it can be to blend two cultures.. and it is also symbolic because the tail end of the wedding celebration foreshadows the family's hardships that are later to come. If you have never read this book.. please do so ASAP.
Phylls Mcdonald More than 1 year ago
So I just purchased this classic for $.99 cents. Know why its si cheap? Because you can only read the ad, over and over again. This book I am so eager to read is held just out of reach. ANY MORE OF THESE goof ups and I'll switch to Kindle!!!!! And guess what nook won't let me post my complaint!!!
Rex Cooper More than 1 year ago
My book would not open eithet. Too bad B&N will not fix it
AGNYC More than 1 year ago
This version of the ebook will not download to my Nook on several attempts OR either of the 2 iPads that I attempted on. When I contact customer service about this they were NO help at all and would not give a refund for a book that would not download.
Venesa Delgado More than 1 year ago
Shouldve read the reviews first. Does not open at all. Do not purchase.
Carolyn Jordan More than 1 year ago
does not work. wish i had bothered to read the reviews
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am 16 years old and reading this for my book report. Upton Sinclair really packs a punch with his powerful writing that describes the lives of immigrants from Lithuania. Even though this is a fictional story, we learn that America isn't the go-lucky country of freedom for all. Most of these immigrants came here in search of better wages and release from their former autocratic regimes, but soon learned the harsh reality which surrounded their hope of freedom. These Lithuanian immigrants suffer from unsanitary housing, and meager wages in an horrible working environment. This extremely detailed book is a MUST read for our 'spoiled' teenagers, (eh hehm... students from beverly hills high school...) who haven't learned the true value of a dollar.
SpryGuy More than 1 year ago
I bought this book but couldn't open it. I called tech support. The agent had me archive the book and unarchive it, but that didn't help. Then she had me download a free book to make sure I had a good internet connection, which I did have. Then she downloaded the book and tried to open it, but she couldn't. So she thanked me for bringing to B&N's attention the fact that this book is defective, and she told me that my credit card would be credited in 2-3 business days. Thirty business days have gone by and my card has not been credited.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
   SPOILER WARNING: The book chronicles the story of a young man named Jurgis Rudkus, a polish immigrant who is trying to make a living at a meat packing industry in order to provide for his family. The novel itself is beautiful and horrifying, giving scrutinizing detail about the horrors of the early 1900’s and its gruesome labor laws. The family is constantly struggling to get by with each member slowly needing to get jobs in order to support their cost of living. Rudkus loves his family, but after 12 hour shifts at the factory he begins to spend his hard earned cash at the bar in order to take the sting of daily monotonous routines. The tale becomes more and more gruesome and eventually Rudkus runs away to the countryside to start his own life, only to return and find his sister has become a prostitute. This rage and anger eventually and almost ironically turns him into a supporter of communism, who fight for workers’ rights.  I love the story not only because of how apparently awful labor laws were back then, but also because it was a book that inspired change, but not the way it was intended. While Upton Sinclair wrote the book for a change in how labor laws were looked at, the real issue that people were concerned with was the meat packing industry. Rudkus recalls in his work experience that meat would just fall into the sawdust and no one washed their hands when handling different types of meat. Rudkus even recalls of how rats would run across the fallen meat and this was just common circumstance. The book inspired such outrage and disbelief that Roosevelt looked into and realized the horror, and so the FDA was born because of one book. The sheer weight of a book carrying such influence that it changes the entire functioning of an industry and becomes much grander than itself I find truly inspirational. This is why I feel enlightenment is so important, a whole nation of people were ignorant to the things they would put into their stomachs until a simple book came along and revealed the horror. Sure, people may not want to hear an ugly truth, but when diseased meat is shipped out daily it can be assumed that perhaps enlightenment should prevail over ignorance.    
tommythomas1951 More than 1 year ago
This book does not open on my nook even though it shows as being on the nook. When I called customer service, I was met with an assistant that had an ATTITUDE of major proportions. She had me unregister my nook and then reregister it but when I could not find my network password she goes off and says that B&N does not have any control of my wireless system -- like I didn't know. If there is a way to report this UNFRIENDLY person I sure would like to know. How am I going to get my refund -- I am going to dispute my charge and let B&N explain it to the credit card company. I AM VERY DISAPPOINTED!!!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Even though I'm only fourteen, this book has impacted me so much. I find this book to be amazing. I think that Sinclair is an excellent writer, with much to tell about his experiences. He portrayed Jurgis and his family of clueless, poor immigrants with spot on writing. I highly reccomend this book. Not only does it reveal the appalling labor & food conditions, it reveals the condition of regular 'city life' in Packingtown. It also reveals the kind of life that immigrants had to endure coming into a seemingly perfect life. The writing itself was so intricate, that you can't help but keep reading on. So, obviously, read this! At first, it was super confusing. After getting further into it, I wouldn't dare put it down, to let the story of Jurgis unfold. Thank you, Upton Sinclair, and Barnes & Noble!
KaWIlli More than 1 year ago
I had always heard about the impact this book had on the food industry and how the public viewed working conditions, but it took reading it to really understand why. Not only does it chronicle the disgusting conditions in Chicago, but it also tells a fascinating political story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Thank you Upton Sinclair! Sinclair took his bold views and went against the corporate machine, exposing the ill treatment of workers during his time. Not only that, but the hazardous working conditions and the gross sanitation practices. Don't read this right after eating. Thanks to Mr. Sinclair, the Food Industry was forced to change for the health and safety of not only the workers, but for the consumers as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've heard about this book for years and thought it would be a good summer read. I found it interesting and heart wrenching. It was obviously quite an eye opener at one time and sad to realize America (in part) treated its immigrants this way. I was extremely disappointed in the ending. I would not read it again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow food sanitary conditions got me but the biggest thing that is burning in my brain was the working condition these characters n real people went threw. Just made me rethink where my food is really comming from lets guess abused drugged animals caged a person named hector whom is over worked extreme low paid and in very unsanitary conditions n not just meat how many times have produce been recalled things havent change i think i was taught to look away insted of whats the real picture
Alan Fincher More than 1 year ago
How does BN rate books? The 2.5 is not an avg of reviewers. Although i agree with megin on principle, i wonder if she has actually opened this version. Has anyone been able to get a refund yet?
megin More than 1 year ago
This book has always been one of my absolute favorites. Upton Sinclair (thankfully!) had part in changing how we live today, by bringing to light the horrible conditions in the meat industry. His work led to the "passage of the Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906, which established the Bureau of Chemistry that would become the Food and Drug Administration in 1930." With his research and publishing all completed before he even hit 30 years old.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to read this novel for AP U.S. History class. I, like others, understood the immense impact this novel posed on American society and legislature at the time. However, I found this book to be a very boring read; it takes a long time to read a simple chapter, and Sinclair's writing is horrid - the grammar is completely wrong, and semi colons are applied where there should be commas! The story drags on and on, from one tragedy to another, and one may dread having to turn to the next chapter or even the next page. I was assigned to read the novels "Uncle Tom's Cabin," which also had a profound effect on American society, and "A Rise to Rebellion." I enjoyed both of those novels; but as for "The Jungle": two thumbs down. Here's a word of advice to those students that have to read this novel: read about 30 pages a day and no more than that. In other words, read little by little, and plan to spend a little over a week on it. To those that wish to read it for pleasure: good luck.
jaydaya 7 months ago
I have been blown away. I was quite skeptical going into this novel. The first two chapters did not interest me very much, but a friend of mine said it was really good. Once Jurgis and his family move to America, the pace picks up quite a bit. II absolutely loved this book. It hit me deeply and I found myself surprised. My only complaints about this novel that have prevented me from giving it five stars is Jurgis makes mistake after mistake and I find it hard to sympathize with his as the author tries to do. Also the last four chapters were very disappointing. I understand that Sinclair is a socialist but he really pushed the idea and not efficiently. The ending was rushed and left a needed resolution. However, even with these flaws, this novel has become an instant favorite. I highly recommend to anyone with an interest in the conditions in which people worked during the early 1900's, and an interest in social issues during that time period.
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