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King James Bible (Authorized Version)
     

King James Bible (Authorized Version)

4.1 24
by King James Version (Various Authors)
 

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The Authorized King James Version is an English translation of the Christian Bible began in 1604 and completed in 1611 by the Church of England. A primary concern of the translators was to produce a Bible that would be appropriate, dignified and resonant in public reading. Hence, in a period of rapid linguistic change, they avoided contemporary idioms; tending instead

Overview

The Authorized King James Version is an English translation of the Christian Bible began in 1604 and completed in 1611 by the Church of England. A primary concern of the translators was to produce a Bible that would be appropriate, dignified and resonant in public reading. Hence, in a period of rapid linguistic change, they avoided contemporary idioms; tending instead towards forms that were already slightly archaic, like "verily" and "it came to pass". While the Authorized Version remains among the most widely sold, modern critical New Testament translations differ substantially from the Authorized Version in a number of passages, primarily because they rely on source manuscripts not then accessible to (or not then highly regarded by) early 17th Century Biblical Scholarship.
In most of the world the Authorized Version has passed out of copyright and is freely reproduced. This is not the case in the United Kingdom where the rights to the Authorized Version are held by the British Crown under perpetual Crown copyright.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012412447
Publisher:
Felcher Publishing
Publication date:
01/02/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
522 KB

Meet the Author

The Authorized Version, commonly known as the King James Version, the King James Bible or simply the KJV, is an English translation by the Church of England of the Christian Bible begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.[3] First printed by the King's Printer, Robert Barker,[4][5] this was the third such official translation into English; the first having been the Great Bible commissioned by the Church of England in the reign of King Henry VIII, and the second having been the Bishop's Bible of 1568.[6] In January 1604, King James I of England convened the Hampton Court Conference where a new English version was conceived in response to the perceived problems of the earlier translations as detected by the Puritans,[7] a faction within the Church of England.

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The King James Bible (EasyIndex Edition) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have looked at a few ebook bibles and they don't navigate as easy as this book
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Shadows_In_The_Dusk More than 1 year ago
Once you get used to the rough southern dialect it really a great book!
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wolfgirl pearsall More than 1 year ago
Why has anyone have not buied this book it sounds fantastic 4 stars
Faisal Alif More than 1 year ago
This is like hatchet,but with a lot of more details and with more boys.
ClassicReaderBW More than 1 year ago
William Golding's novel Lord of the Flies, can more appropriately be called my favorite book that I have ever read for a school assignment. I found it to be a very appealing book that really caught my interests. The way that Golding left you in suspense through the entire novel really helped me to pay attention the most. There was such immense detail in every chapter; it was like I was right there. All of the characters had their own personalities that really made the novel what it was, suspenseful as well as something that you could relate to. It is the descriptions that Golding uses that makes you really have to step back to remember that this is only a novel and not really happening. In the beginning of the novel, you are introduced to a group of young boys who are stranded on an island. The boys are almost destined for tragedy, but by knowing that they are stranded on an island. They are faced with hardships that no one should ever have to face, especially for children as young as five years old, and the oldest of the boys is merely twelve years of age. With no adult supervision on the island with them, the boys think that their time on this tropical island will be fun and enjoyable. The days look as though they will be easy to live through, with crystal clear water to swim in and people to become friends with. But when darkness covers the islands, and insanity gets to the boys, their lives on the island become possessed and evil. The novel makes you wonder what would happen to you if you were faced with the dilemma that these small boys had to face. Lord of the Flies has a certain tone that is entertaining to all readers. It also teaches us some important values, such as actually listening to someone instead of being cruel to them, then wondering why you were so mean when they are long gone. The novel was a wonderful piece of literature that should be recommended to anyone; even those people who we all know hate reading, especially if we are forced to read something. This is the book that will make you think, "I wonder what would happen if I were in their shoes." Overall, Golding's novel left me speechless and wanting more. It was one of those books that you wish would go on forever, but you know that deep down inside, it has to come to a close.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When yozu and me was at the table i felled like you and me will go out. She dont like you so gt over it honey!!!!!! And just stop tryin to ask everybody else out and that oter girl alexis dont like yiu eitherbsobget over you freakin desprast nggaa!!!
Tran__Nguyen More than 1 year ago
In a civilization of destroyed reason, there lies a group of children on an abanoned island. A world where to this kids, mentality is one of a rotting essence. It quickly becomes a battle of civilization vs. savagery. There are two major forces opposing each other. The two characters, Ralph respectively the protagonist, and Jack, the antagonist. Ralph representing civilization as Jack represents savagery. During a war in Great Britain, these kids are left to fend for themselves and all wind up taking paths that differ from one another. Leadership is something compromised and sought throughout the novel, and there faces several hardships that cannot be forgotten. To me, this novel is a worthwhile read, as it allows readers to visualize and understand that as harsh life seems, there is plenty more that can be faced and conquered. Not only that, the novel itself has many concepts and themes that should be soaked in within the reader's eyes. To me, a major section in the book was the revelation of "the beast". As simon conjured up a theory of whether the beast did indeed exist or not exist, it posed a question of whether it would be the destruction or frustration of the gang. The characters, Roger, Simon, Ralph, Jack, Piggy, Sam, and Eric all as stated "had a beast within." . This goes along with Sigmund Freud's dream interpretation theory to me. Fears are not things that are easily conquered, so by constructing them within a dream, it allows us to constantly realize that a fear needs to be overtaken within the novel. Just as Simon encountered a major plot within the novel. In a truly sadistic turn of events, reason is lost, and savagery takes an uphill rise.Within it contains several biblical references that readers may be able to pick up on as well. The constant battle within the novel makes it a well worthy read for any reader. Personally to me, this novel is a good read. It contains a good leading towards the story, it allows you to circumvent the situation that William Golding is trying to convey throughout the novel, and it allows readers to view and understand hardships that all people face. Though many harsh moments, it gives the reader a better realization of reality and can be in any sense helpful anyone. With any conflict, a reader can be sure to foretell that a novel will have many experiences to convey, such as why is it called Lord Of the Flies? Within it contains several biblical references that readers may be able to pick up on as well.