The Last Girls

The Last Girls

Other Format

$111.37 $123.75 Save 10% Current price is $111.37, Original price is $123.75. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

The Last Girls by Lee Smith, Linda Stephens

On a beautiful June day in 1965, a dozen girls-classmates at a picturesque Blue Ridge women's college-launched their homemade raft (inspired by Huck Finn's) on a trip down the Mississippi. It's Girls A-Go-Go Down the Mississippi read the headline in the Paducah, Kentucky, paper.

Thirty-five years later, four of those "girls" reunite to cruise the river again. This time it's on the luxury steamboat, The Belle of Natchez, and there's no publicity. This time, when they reach New Orleans, they'll give the river the ashes of a fifth rafter-beautiful Margaret ("Baby") Ballou.

Revered for her powerful female characters, here Lee Smith tells a brilliantly authoritative story of how college pals who grew up in an era when they were still called "girls" have negotiated life as "women." Harriet Holding is a hesitant teacher who has never married (she can't explain why, even to herself). Courtney Gray struggles to step away from her Southern Living-style life. Catherine Wilson, a sculptor, is suffocating in her happy third marriage. Anna Todd is a world-famous romance novelist escaping her own tragedies through her fiction. And finally there is Baby, the girl they come to bury-along with their memories of her rebellions and betrayals.

THe Last Girls is wonderful reading. It's also wonderfully revealing of women's lives-of the idea of romance, of the relevance of past to present, of memory and desire.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781402578069
Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date: 02/11/2004
Series: Freddy the Pig Series

About the Author

Born in the small coal-mining town of Grundy, Virginia, Lee Smith began writing stories at the age of nine and selling them for a nickel apiece. Since then, she has written seventeen works of fiction, including Fair and Tender Ladies, Oral History, and, most recently, Guests on Earth. She has received many awards, including the North Carolina Award for Literature and an Academy Award in Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; her novel The Last Girls was a New York Times bestseller as well as winner of the Southern Book Critics Circle Award. She lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina, with her husband, the writer Hal Crowther. Visit her at www.leesmith.com.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Last Girls 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was the first book by Lee Smith I have read and I loved it! I went to a women's college in Virginia and it reminded me so much of all my friends and made me 'home sick' for those days. Treat yourself to this book- you will not be disappointed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A pretty good book, though it was sometimes a little strange. I would recommend it to young women or mature readers. It's very funny at times and made me laugh out loud, but it also made me cry.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The author reads this and I should have stopped the disc as soon as I heard the narrator's very thick southern accent b/c this may have something to do with my not enjoying this book. There are too many characters for this author to handle. Just plain boring, confusing and depressing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished this book for a book club.Had to force myself to get through this book. Did not keep my attention. Found myself skimming through many parts of it. No one in my book club liked it. Did not like the characters. They didn't seem to like eachother or themselves. I'm trying to figure out where some readers cried while reading the book. This book lacked flow, character, substance, etc.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I initially got really into this book. Loved the characters immediately. About halfway through, the book started to limp. The ending was just a fizzle. I also thought the book 'wandered' as the author wrote pages upon pages about the river and it's history. If I had wanted to know that much about it, I would have read a history book. It's as if the author was trying to bulk up the book or prove how in-depth the research had been.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I did not hate it, but I was definitely less than in love with it. I bought it on the way to the beach last year because I had left my Harry Potter book at home; should have left well enough alone. The plot is disjointed and forced. When I got to the end, I wasn't really sure what had happened or where the story went wrong.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I recieved this book for Christmas this year, and finished it in about 3 days. I thought that it was a pretty accurate description of southern life, college days, etc. The ending did leave me hanging a little, but I like that- it gives the reader an opportunity to formulate their own opinions. All in all, I would defintely recommend this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm about 3/4 of the way through this book and am asking myself, 'what is this book about exactly?' I do not agree with another reviewer who said it was vulgar. If you want vulgar, read Our Lady of the Forest. However, both books are disappointing and I am at a loss as to why they are bestsellers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Or does it really? Southern women in your 50's is this how it really was/is? After thirty years of living in the south I still have a hard time believing women really grew up so silently, or should I say so alone? These characters feel so alone, so unconnected -- how sad? Why doesn't anyone say what they are really thinking? Interesting--but, I was expecting more depth.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What a great novel from one of the country's best southern writers! This tale of friends coming to terms with the past and finding their way through middle age left me in tears and laughter. Lee Smith does not disappoint us with this long awaited new novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ccinnc More than 1 year ago
Loved it!
eagle3tx More than 1 year ago
I was intrigued by the premise and totally let down by the execution. I neither cared about nor identified with any of the women. I would hope that my reunions with college friends are never this dull and unimportant.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A different view of being friends and life
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago