×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Last of the Mohicans
     

The Last of the Mohicans

4.1 84
by James Fenimore Cooper
 

See All Formats & Editions

Illus. in black-and-white. This action-packed edition of James Fenimore Cooper's famous adventure brings the wilds of the American frontier and the drama of the French and Indian War to vivid life.  

Overview

Illus. in black-and-white. This action-packed edition of James Fenimore Cooper's famous adventure brings the wilds of the American frontier and the drama of the French and Indian War to vivid life.  

Editorial Reviews

PopMatters - Kerrie Mills
Nearly 200 years on, the tale of The Last of the Mohicans is still a part of the American consciousness.
From the Publisher
"[Cooper's] sympathy is large, and his humor is as genuine—and as perfectly unaffected—as his art."— Joseph Conrad
Leon Jackson University of South Carolina
"James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans presents a double challenge to today's readers; a work of historical fiction, it has become, in itself, a historical artifact in need of explication. Paul Gutjahr's elegant introduction and judicious choice of secondary sources help to place Cooper's novel in its historical moment, while at the same time clarifying the novel's own engagements with American history. Accentuating Cooper's engagement with issues of race, gender, and hemispheric conflict, Gutjahr's edition reminds us of why Cooper's novel remains timely and even urgent. It will be the edition of choice for scholars, students, and casual readers alike."
David J. Carlson California State University
"Paul Gutjahr's edition of The Last of the Mohicans is a model text, ideally suited for the classroom or the general reader. The decision to print the novel in its original two-volume format foregrounds Cooper's careful structuring of the book. Gutjahr's informative introduction effectively explores the novel's formal structure and its engagements with colonial and antebellum American history. The contextual materials included are also well-chosen. Including excerpts of Cooper's ethnographic source material in the edition is extremely helpful, as this will aid readers in developing a deeper understanding of the novel's representations of colonial history. This is certainly an edition I will use and recommend."
PopMatters

Nearly 200 years on, the tale of The Last of the Mohicans is still a part of the American consciousness.
— Kerrie Mills

Children's Literature - Elizabeth Fronk
Set in colonial America during the French and Indian Wars, this story follows Alice Munro, Cora Munro, and Duncan Heyward as they travel with Magua to Fort William Henry. Along the way, they join a group of Mohicans named Uncas, Chingachgook, and Hawkeye. Due to the ongoing war between British and French, it is difficult to know who is a friend or who is an enemy. However, it soon becomes apparent that Magua is not to be trusted and intends to kidnap Heyward and the Munros. Cora learns that Magua wants to exact revenge on her father, and she offers herself to Magua; fortunately, the Mohicans come to their rescue. The women and Heyward are rescued, but they must hasten to the fort. When they arrive, Colonel Munro realizes that he cannot get reinforcements and must surrender to the French. Then, Huron Indians attack, and Magua is able to capture Cora. Cooper’s classic story has an exotic setting, adventure, and romance. It also has some unique observations about class and race. However, the stilted writing makes it difficult to follow. Also, the lush illustrations do not correspond to the page on which they appear; this might add to readers’ confusion. High school readers (or those wanting to compare this with the 1992 movie) might read this, especially given its handsome presentation. However, the book’s cost and the availability of other, free versions might still discourage examination of this rendition. Reviewer: Elizabeth Fronk; Ages 12 up.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780553902143
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/29/2005
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
231,738
File size:
617 KB

Read an Excerpt

Chapter I

Mine ear is open, and my heart prepared; The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold:— Say, is my kingdom lost? Richard II, III.ii. 93–95.

It was a feature peculiar to the colonial wars of North America, that the toils and dangers of the wilderness were to be encountered, before the adverse hosts could meet. A wide, and, apparently, an impervious boundary of forests, severed the possessions of the hostile provinces of France and England. The hardy colonist, and the trained European who fought at his side, frequently expended months in struggling against the rapids of the streams, or in effecting the rugged passes of the mountains, in quest of an opportunity to exhibit their courage in a more martial conflict. But, emulating the patience and self-denial of the practised native warriors, they learned to overcome every difficulty; and it would seem, that in time, there was no recess of the woods so dark, nor any secret place so lovely, that it might claim exemption from the inroads of those who had pledged their blood to satiate their vengeance, or to uphold the cold and selfish policy of the distant monarchs of Europe.

Perhaps no district, throughout the wide extent of the intermediate frontiers, can furnish a livelier picture of the cruelty and fierceness of the savage warfare of those periods, than the country which lies between the head waters of the Hudson and the adjacent lakes.

The facilities which nature had there offered to the march of the combatants, were too obvious to be neglected. The lengthened sheet of the Champlain stretched from the frontiers of Canada, deep within the borders of the neighbouring province of New-York, forming a natural passage across half the distance that the French were compelled to master in order to strike their enemies. Near its southern termination, it received the contributions of another lake, whose waters were so limpid, as to have been exclusively selected by the Jesuit missionaries, to perform the typical purification of baptism, and to obtain for it the title of the lake “du Saint Sacrement.” The less zealous English thought they conferred a sufficient honour on its unsullied fountains, when they bestowed the name of their reigning prince, the second of the House of Hanover. The two united to rob the untutored possessors of its wooded scenery of their native right to perpetuate its original appellation of “Horican.”*

Winding its way among countless islands, and imbedded in mountains, the “holy lake” extended a dozen leagues still farther to the south. With the high plain that there interposed itself to the further passage of the water, commenced a portage of as many miles, which conducted the adventurer to the banks of the Hudson, at a point, where, with the usual obstructions of the rapids, or rifts, as they were then termed in the language of the country, the river became navigable to the tide.

While, in the pursuit of their daring plans of annoyance, the restless enterprise of the French even attempted the distant and difficult gorges of the Alleghany, it may easily be imagined that their proverbial acuteness would not overlook the natural advantages of the district we have just described. It became, emphatically, the bloody arena, in which most of the battles for the mastery of the colonies were contested. Forts were erected at the different points that commanded the facilities of the route, and were taken and retaken, rased and rebuilt, as victory alighted on the hostile banners. While the husbandmen shrunk back from the dangerous passes, within the safer boundaries of the more ancient settlements, armies larger than those that had often disposed of the sceptres of the mother countries, were seen to bury themselves in these forests, whence they rarely returned but in skeleton bands, that were haggard with care, or dejected by defeat. Though the arts of peace were unknown to this fatal region, its forests were alive with men; its glades and glens rang with the sounds of martial music, and the echoes of its mountains threw back the laugh, or repeated the wanton cry, of many a gallant and reckless youth, as he hurried by them, in the noontide of his spirits, to slumber in a long night of forgetfulness.

* As each nation of the Indians had either its language or its dialect, they usually gave different names to the same places, though nearly all of their appellations were descriptive of the object. Thus, a literal translation of the name of this beautiful sheet of water, used by the tribe that dwelt on its banks, would be “The tail of the Lake.” Lake George, as it is vulgarly, and now indeed legally, called, forms a sort of tail to Lake Champlain, when viewed on the map. Hence the name. [1831]

It was in this scene of strife and bloodshed, that the incidents we shall attempt to relate occurred, during the third year of the war which England and France last waged, for the possession of a country, that neither was destined to retain.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

What People are Saying About This

D. H. Lawrence
In his immortal friendship of Chingachgook and Matty Bumppo [Cooper] dreamed the nucleus of a new society….A stark stripped human relationship of two men, deeper than the deeps of sex. Deeper than property, deeper than fatherhood, deeper than marriage, deeper than Love.
James Franklin Beard
The Last of the Mohicans raises again the question of the efficacy of human effort to control irrational forces at work in individual men, races, and nations. The question has never been more pertinent than now.
From the Publisher
“In his immortal friendship of Chingachgook and Natty Bumppo [Cooper] dreamed the nucleus of a new society….A stark human relationship of two men, deeper than the deeps of sex. Deeper than property, deeper than fatherhood, deeper than marriage, deeper than Love.” –D. H. Lawrence

The Last of the Mohicans raises again the question of the efficacy of human effort to control irrational forces at work in individual men, races, and nations. The question has never been more pertinent than now.” –James Franklin Beard 

Meet the Author

Leslie Fiedler is Samuel Clemens Professor and SUNY Distinguished Professor at SUNY Buffalo. One of the greatest living literary critics, his works include LOVE AND DEATH IN THE AMERICAN NOVEL (1960), AN END TO INNOCENCE (1955); NUDE CROQUET (1969), and FREAKS (1978).


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 15, 1789
Date of Death:
September 14, 1851
Place of Birth:
Burlington, New Jersey
Place of Death:
Cooperstown, New York
Education:
Yale University (expelled in 1805)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Last of the Mohicans 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 84 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Last of the Mohicans was an interesting and very detailed portrayal of a small group in the middle of the French and Indian War. I liked it a lot and would like to read more of James Fenimore Cooper¿s novels sometime. I know that many people enjoyed the movie, but to get the whole picture, you really need to read the book. The movie is great, I agree, but I just liked to book better (then again, when is it that you ever like a movie more than the book?). Though not my favourite classic, it is still an amazing book, very worthy of anyone¿s reading time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
James Fenimore Cooper's novel, The last of the Mohincans, tells the story of the colonial scout Hawkeye, real name Natty Bumppo, with his 2 Indian companions Changachgook (his Mohican father) and his mohican brother Uncas. They stumble onto a party of British soldiers conducting 2 fair maidens (names Alice and Cora) traveling to their father Colonel Munro, who is the commander of the British Fort William Henry during the French and Indian War. They are being treacherously lead by a huron scout Magua who intends to hurt the 2 girls in order to get to their father the Colonel. I thought that The Last of the Mohicans was a very interesting piece of work. The book has a compelling story and great characters. Any one that is interested in historical fiction should read this book. The aouther tells this story in chronological order and in third person. He was very descriptive and precise in writing this novel. It is filled with action and adventure. It has a heart felt story with a sad, but meaningful conclusion that is poignant and well thought out. It gives you a sence of guilt to anyone that is from a British/ French heritage. It makes you realize what is the real goal of English or French society, putting risk on lives and ancient cultural heritage of the Native American people? Or have a few extra acres of land? I think that anyone who loves reading and have a plot that makes their mind work a little, would have the privelege of reading this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im here
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She goes to a table to sit. Her blue crystalized dress gets in her way.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
His mask was ovalish and white, that of a wickedly smiling face. He grips two bottle of absinthe in both of his hands.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in wearing a short blue dress
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*walks up* id please.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
'the republic' all res. For every ad posted there, two will be posted here
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walked over "whats happening" he muttered passing by
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Hi." She only chuckled, ruffling Azure's hair in an friendly gesture after he was sat down. "You're an idiot, Fox."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
How about 'walt whitney'.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is gone
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lickedher pups.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
&#0374 &#8274 &#0113 &#7738 &#9265 &#9166 &#9636 &#0166
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mewed loadly even though he was born awhile ago the fluffy fur didnt hide how sickly he kit looked its stoumach growled ladly needing some milk to feed on
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Son of flame, Daughter of earth,<br> A new pack has risen.<br> Their leader,<br> Kindles the fire of hatred against you.<p> Darkness will fall upon the land.<br> Violence will wear the crown.<br> The war is near at hand.<p> Son of flame<br> Guide your pack with your strength and understanding.<br> Daughter of earth,<br> Unite the pack with your kindness and wisdom.<p> That you may not diminish, but shall open a golden age.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Aww an im loner freind of extintion
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Shooed river off, then buried void, breaking her promise to not come to her funeral. Before she covered the body up, she licked voids cheek one last time. Goodbye, void. You were an amazing leader and an even better friend. She whispered silently, not crying, but extremely sad.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Are you baiting me?" She asked quietly, closing her eyes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gggdhjjlf vj
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is like a visit from an old and wise friend. A refreshing read. Well written. Cooper's deep research is so beautifully evident in his lyrical descriptions. My only problem was NOT enough time to read and absorb the book during the election period. I will certainly read it again before I die.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago