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The Lebensborn Experiment: Book I
     

The Lebensborn Experiment: Book I

5.0 3
by Joyce Yvette Davis
 

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Amid the chaos and destruction of World War II, racial profiling runs rampant. After kidnapped children whose appearances fail to meet the Nordic ideal are taken to concentration camps, some are used in experiments to satisfy the Reich's quest for Aryan Superiority. It is April 28, 1945, and a sinister struggle between life and death secretly takes place high in a

Overview

Amid the chaos and destruction of World War II, racial profiling runs rampant. After kidnapped children whose appearances fail to meet the Nordic ideal are taken to concentration camps, some are used in experiments to satisfy the Reich's quest for Aryan Superiority. It is April 28, 1945, and a sinister struggle between life and death secretly takes place high in a dingy tower of a medieval castle in the Black Forest.

Under the watchful eyes of Nazi Colonel Otto Strass, notorious inventor Dr. Josef Weiss injects a ten-year-old Polish boy with an experimental serum, killing him---that is, until the child, Adok, is miraculously resurrected with unforeseen side effects. Meanwhile, somewhere in the castle dungeon, a Negro American soldier, Sergeant Kapp Johnson, awaits ceremonial execution. But things go awry. On that same day, Hitler's unexpected suicide throws the castle into bedlam. In the ensuing confusion, Kapp is mistakenly given the serum. In a matter of minutes, Kapp has been given a gift even God cannot bestow upon him: eternal life on Earth.

In this exciting historical thriller, an American soldier and a Polish boy who unwittingly become victims of the Nazi regime in the final days of World War II must find a way to escape their fate and find their way back home-before it is too late.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781458213679
Publisher:
Abbott Press
Publication date:
01/10/2014
Pages:
226
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.52(d)

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The Lebensborn Experiment: Book I 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ReadersFavorite1 More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Bil Howard for Readers' Favorite In the dark and dingy tower of a medieval castle in the Black Forest, Dr. Josef Weiss has finally accomplished an impossible feat of science; the ability for a man to resurrect himself. The Lebensborn Experiment by Joyce Yvette Davis is a historical thriller set in the closing days of World War II as the Nazi regime is rocked by the sudden suicide of Adolf Hitler. Within the dark walls of the old castle, two unlikely figures are reborn, with not only the miraculous power to resurrect themselves, but also enhanced skills that make them more powerful than ever before. Sergeant Kapp Johnson is an African-American soldier who was about to be executed when the serum that Dr. Weiss had perfected was accidentally injected into him instead of a dose that would put him to death. Ten-year-old Adok had been the doctor’s first experiment with the serum; a boy who had been kidnapped from his Polish parents and was being groomed to be the future of the Aryan race. Now, both Adok and Kapp have to figure out how to live with what they are and what it all means. Above all else, however, they just want to find their way back home. Joyce Yvette Davis has created a historical thriller that will make the hair on the back of your neck stand up. With overtones of Dr. Frankenstein’s monster, The Lebensborn Experiment uses the experimentation of German scientists to create a pure, Aryan race as the means of making this thriller come alive. The inhumanity and the injustices faced by the two victims who were injected with the serum are contrasted with the rigid, unfeeling pragmatism of Dr. Weiss and Colonel Strass in a way that has the reader celebrating their humanity and fostering a hatred for anyone who would dare to experiment on humans the way that the Germans did. There is a certain amount of payback that brings some relief to the reader, but all in all, there is an undertone of the tragic consequences of Nazi experimentation on humans. The Lebensborn Experiment is an excellent read that will stir your emotions as well as make you shiver while you consider what might have been had some of the Nazi experiments actually worked.
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Cheryl E. Rodriguez for Readers' Favorite Joyce Yvette Davis writes a WWII thriller in The Lebensborn Experiment. Deep within the Black Forest, a castle stands resolute. No one has any idea what really is going on inside its ancient fortified walls. The year is 1945; the war in Europe is escalating. Hitler’s evil regime has no limits to its diabolical deeds. Propelled by racial hatred, the dream of a superhuman Aryan race is now possible. One scientist, a doctor of exceptional genius or madness, has the potential to change the world with his experimental serum. The “Elixir of Life” not only gives extraordinarily long life, but enhances natural abilities, creating physical superiority. However, on the dawn of the experiment’s unveiling, Hitler dies. Chaos ensues. The supremacy of the Third Reich collapses, releasing the hounds of hell. No one can be trusted. Two prisoners were injected with the serum; a Polish boy and a black American soldier. Adok and Kapp are free of the castle walls; now only silence restrains them. Afraid to talk, they are forever shackled to their secret. The war may be over, but for them everything is different. “The diabolical work of the Lebensborn has at last been destroyed.” Really, or has it just begun?   The Lebensborn Experiment is exceptionally written. Just when you thought you had heard and read everything about the Third Reich, Joyce Yvette Davis reveals another diabolical act. Her story revolves around the Lebensborn Register Society, an organization that kidnapped “racially valuable” children to be “Germanized.” Davis also exposes the “organized insanity” behind the scientific experimentation during WWII. Sufficient and accurate historical background was given, creating a foundation for the plot to build upon. She wrote her characters with depth and dimension, giving thorough physical descriptions, as well as revealing their thoughts and mannerisms. The setting descriptions, whether the Germanic Black Forest, a 13th century Nordic castle or battlefield images, were written vividly and with picturesque quality. Davis’ writing style contains an abundance of similes, making it appealing to read. Each chapter opens with an intriguing quote that complements the plot. The use of German phrases in the dialogue enhanced the creativity of the novel. The action of the plot moves with ease from place to place and character to character. Captivated, I had a hard time putting it down. The denouement is wrapped up and packaged nicely. However, the reader is left anticipating the eventual reunion of The Lebensborn Experiment.