Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

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The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (Illustrated) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sterne's book is the most hilarious ride one can hope for in the world of English literature. It breaks every rule and convention of the English novel; it can be called the first postmodern novel, and was written before even modernism had taken shape. Neitzsche called Sterne 'the most liberated spirit of all time', and this book is the reason why. Enough said. Buy it, read it, and laugh until you cry.
Geogre More than 1 year ago
The Everyman Library edition of Tristram Shandy is a pleasant, clean text in a satisfying hard cover at an affordable price. Those who already know their middle 18th century Britain will be able to navigate the text from this edition alone, but anyone who has not read Tristram Shandy before may prefer a thoroughly emendated edition, like the Norton. The Florida Edition, edited by Melvin New, is the choice for those seeking an authoritative critical text. For me, I wanted a copy of Tristram Shandy for re-reading, for leisure, and for comfort, and the Everyman delivered all of those things beautifully.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sterne is the patriarch of modernism. His text is rich with short cuts, detours, and dead ends. It threatens to stall or stay in perpetual motion. In short, it is nothing but a joy to read. The reader constantly plays a game within Sterne¿s own textual game. Each return back to the novel sparks a new advent of the eye. Certain phrases of Sterne¿s read like poetry, others suggest the potency of a painting like the Mona Lisa, deep, uncertain, and ever staring back into the nothingness deeps of the viewer¿s pupil. I appreciate texts like James Joyce¿s Ulysses all the more having read Tristram Shandy, the text that launched a thousand typos (well, actually, it took another one hundred and sixty three years for Joyce to get his ¿modernist¿ act together). Tristram Shandy is a truly a celebration in literary masochism. The struggle to conquer each page¿s uncertainty only results in failure. Yet, the failure to pin down the infinite is sweet, bittersweet. Our struggle with the indeterminate that paints each page is beautiful. Sterne¿s games provoke the eye and mind to remain ever questioning; for indeed, only the uncertain defines the extent of one¿s genius. In his refusal to accept the conventional, Sterne is the ultimate optometrist. He corrected my 20/20 vision; I now see blurry, indeed I would not want to see any other way.
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