The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction

The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction

by William E. Jr. Shotts

Paperback

$39.95
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Thursday, July 18

Overview

You've experienced the shiny, point-and-click surface of your Linux computer—now dive below and explore its depths with the power of the command line.

The Linux Command Line takes you from your very first terminal keystrokes to writing full programs in Bash, the most popular Linux shell. Along the way you'll learn the timeless skills handed down by generations of gray-bearded, mouse-shunning gurus: file navigation, environment configuration, command chaining, pattern matching with regular expressions, and more.

In addition to that practical knowledge, author William Shotts reveals the philosophy behind these tools and the rich heritage that your desktop Linux machine has inherited from Unix supercomputers of yore.

As you make your way through the book's short, easily-digestible chapters, you'll learn how to:
–Create and delete files, directories, and symlinks
–Administer your system, including networking, package installation, and process management
–Use standard input and output, redirection, and pipelines
–Edit files with Vi, the world’s most popular text editor
–Write shell scripts to automate common or boring tasks
–Slice and dice text files with cut, paste, grep, patch, and sed

Once you overcome your initial "shell shock," you'll find that the command line is a natural and expressive way to communicate with your computer. Just don't be surprised if your mouse starts to gather dust.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781593273897
Publisher: No Starch Press
Publication date: 01/22/2012
Pages: 480
Sales rank: 174,113
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

William E. Shotts, Jr. has been a software professional and avid Linux user for more than 15 years. He has an extensive background in software development, including technical support, quality assurance, and documentation. He is also the creator of LinuxCommand.org, a Linux education and advocacy site featuring news, reviews, and extensive support for using the Linux command line.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgement
Introduction
Part 1: Learning the Shell
Chapter 1. What Is The Shell?
Chapter 2. Navigation
Chapter 3. Exploring The System
Chapter 4. Manipulating Files And Directories
Chapter 5. Working With Commands
Chapter 6. Redirection
Chapter 7. Seeing The World As The Shell Sees It
Chapter 8. Advanced Keyboard Tricks
Chapter 9. Permissions
Chapter 10. Processes
Part 2: Configuration and the Environment
Chapter 11. The Environment
Chapter 12. A Gentle Introduction To vi
Chapter 13. Customizing The Prompt
Part 3: Common Tasks and Essential Tools
Chapter 14. Package Management
Chapter 15. Storage Media
Chapter 16. Networking
Chapter 17. Searching For Files
Chapter 18. Archiving And Backup
Chapter 19. Regular Expressions
Chapter 20. Text Processing
Chapter 21. Formatting Output
Chapter 22. Printing
Chapter 23. Compiling Programs
Part 4: Writing Shell Scripts
Chapter 24. Writing Your First Script
Chapter 25. Starting A Project
Chapter 26. Top-Down Design
Chapter 27. Flow Control: Branching With if
Chapter 28. Reading Keyboard Input
Chapter 29. Flow Control: Looping With while / until
Chapter 30. Troubleshooting
Chapter 31. Flow Control: Branching With case
Chapter 32. Positional Parameters
Chapter 33. Flow Control: Looping With for
Chapter 34. Strings And Numbers
Chapter 35. Arrays
Chapter 36. Exotica

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
ashuping More than 1 year ago
O'Reilly Publishing provided me access to an electronic copy of this book for review purposes. The command line can be one of the most intimidating aspects of learning Linux, I know it was for me. And while the command line gives you an awesome amount of power with using Linux, it also makes it entirely to easy to destroy and delete entire directories without trying. It's like what Uncle Ben said in Spider Man "with great power comes great responsibility." Learning the command line is one of those things that takes a good guide and clear instructions (and warnings on what not to do), and while I had friends who helped me walk through the process, it still seemed intimidating. And after reading this book, I wish I had it when I started out. William makes the command line less intimidating, provides clear instructions, and lets you know the pitfalls to watch out for. The book is broken down into four major sections: Learning the shell Configuration and the environment Common tasks and essential tools Writing Shell Scripts with easy to navigate chapters. Some of the chapters include: file navigation, Vi and Vim, environment configuration, command chaining, pattern matching with regular expressions, and more. Where this book excels is that it is written with the novice in mind and presents the information clearly, with easy to read instructions, and plenty of examples so that you can see what its supposed to look like. The best part of the examples, William truly presents them as what the reader will see when they first start out vs. using his own personalized environment (which some instructors have a tendency of doing.) This means that the reader will instantly know where they are in the process. Even more importantly he tries to eschew the technical jargon that can overwhelm a novice. While at times he might go overboard with wordage in explaining things, it is still sure to help the novice answer many questions they might have while learning the command line. While the chapters may not cover a topic in depth, such as the one on Vi and Vim, they provide the reader with enough information to be comfortable with what they're learning. The section that I found most helpful, was the last section dealing with writing shell scripts. William gives a solid foundation to learning this helpful tool, provides plenty of examples, and makes it seem easy to set up. Even better, he gives a brief lesson on Regular Expressions, which will help with writing the scripts. Even though this book is written for the novice user, I still found it a good refresher on what commands do what. I would highly recommend this book for users just starting out in Linux and for those that need a refresher on how to navigate the command line. I give the book 5 out of 5 stars.
Anonymous 6 months ago
I've only read through the first 6 chapters but I can tell this is a great book! I need to learn Linux so I picked up this book. I really like the approach it takes to teaching me Linux and the writing style. Each chapter is short and it only introduces a few things in each chapter. When it must include something that's too advanced for the current topic but necessary to include, it tells you it's going to cover it in detail later. The examples are complete consistent so they are easy to follow and understand. It is not going to be the best book if you just want a Linux command reference but if you want to learn Linux I think it's the way to go. Read this first then get your command reference book if you want one.
zzshupinga on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
O¿Reilly Publishing provided me access to an electronic copy of this book for review purposes.The command line can be one of the most intimidating aspects of learning Linux, I know it was for me. And while the command line gives you an awesome amount of power with using Linux, it also makes it entirely to easy to destroy and delete entire directories without trying. It¿s like what Uncle Ben said in Spider Man ¿with great power comes great responsibility.¿ Learning the command line is one of those things that takes a good guide and clear instructions (and warnings on what not to do), and while I had friends who helped me walk through the process, it still seemed intimidating. And after reading this book, I wish I had it when I started out. William makes the command line less intimidating, provides clear instructions, and lets you know the pitfalls to watch out for.The book is broken down into four major sections:Learning the shellConfiguration and the environmentCommon tasks and essential toolsWriting Shell Scriptswith easy to navigate chapters. Some of the chapters include: file navigation, Vi and Vim, environment configuration, command chaining, pattern matching with regular expressions, and more.Where this book excels is that it is written with the novice in mind and presents the information clearly, with easy to read instructions, and plenty of examples so that you can see what its supposed to look like. The best part of the examples, William truly presents them as what the reader will see when they first start out vs. using his own personalized environment (which some instructors have a tendency of doing.) This means that the reader will instantly know where they are in the process. Even more importantly he tries to eschew the technical jargon that can overwhelm a novice. While at times he might go overboard with wordage in explaining things, it is still sure to help the novice answer many questions they might have while learning the command line. While the chapters may not cover a topic in depth, such as the one on Vi and Vim, they provide the reader with enough information to be comfortable with what they¿re learning. The section that I found most helpful, was the last section dealing with writing shell scripts. William gives a solid foundation to learning this helpful tool, provides plenty of examples, and makes it seem easy to set up. Even better, he gives a brief lesson on Regular Expressions, which will help with writing the scripts.Even though this book is written for the novice user, I still found it a good refresher on what commands do what. I would highly recommend this book for users just starting out in Linux and for those that need a refresher on how to navigate the command line. I give the book 5 out of 5 stars.