The Magnificent Ambersons

The Magnificent Ambersons

by Booth Tarkington
3.9 37

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The Magnificent Ambersons 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 37 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I came across this book from its placement on the Modern Library's Top 100 list (and it barely made it on!). When I first set out to read this book, I had no idea what to expect. In fact, I was quite dreading the task. However, I was quickly proven wrong. This is one of the absolute best novels I have ever read. The book is somewhat a portrait of young love, youthful arrogance, and the moral degeneration caused by old wealth. Yet it is also an interesting portrait of the typical forgotten American Industrial city -- Gary, Indiana; Allentown, Pennsylvania; Sandusky, Ohio come to mind. In fact, it was among these cities, in their prime and on the verge of their downfall, that Booth Tarkington matured. In this way, one supposes, the novel is not the story of George Minafer and his family, but the story of Anytown, USA, falling out of date vicariously through its ancient wealth. Tarkington was prophetic in his portrait. The decline of the Amberson wealth usurped by the Automotive industry is a direct parallel to what would happen not so much later in the century with the export of American labor. Certainly this novel speaks volumes about life: not just of the wealthy, but implicitly about the working class.
Timhrk More than 1 year ago
Barnes & Noble must be commended for keeping in prints lesser known literary works. The Magnificent Andersons is a novel about transition. An upper class waspy family, and its place in society, is forever changed by the coming of the automobile and other industries and the period of massive immigration in the early 20th century. The main character, George Amberson, is a callow youth who becomes a victim not just of these forces, but of his own insistence on trying to hold on to the world he knew-of strict social structures where wealthy male protestants held power through birth not merit. This insistence results in tragedy, denying his mother the true love of her life and leaving his spinster aunt in abject poverty. Family love and loyalty may triumph-these are values George holds dear and lives up to-but they do nothing to prevent the destruction of an old way of life. In spite of some clunky sentences, Tarkington is an objective observer of events. I remember liking the Orson Wells film, the book is just as good. I even liked the old fashion over use of foreshadowing. Please visit: timothyherrick.blogspot.com
Anonymous 3 months ago
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Anonymous 3 months ago
Hi kana i saw the chat room and thought i should join. Is that ok
Anonymous 5 months ago
Is this place still alive?
Anonymous 5 months ago
Hey may I join this chat?
Anonymous 6 months ago
Why r u talking about South Carolina? What's going on? (Lolz I'm not deadz)
Anonymous 6 months ago
Sup guys
Anonymous 8 months ago
This book was difficult to read because there many misspelled words.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ruthhill74 More than 1 year ago
Mostly, this is a good, old classic. I was surprised to discover it had won a Pulitzer Prize, but I realize that this was written in a different time period. It is hard to read this book from their frame of reference. Mostly, the book goes along at a nice clip. The characters are well-developed, and the dialogue is what one would expect from this time period and this privileged cast of characters. Realism is what drives this story. If you are looking for a romantic story where everyone lives happily after, I recommend you look elsewhere. I could have done without the psychic portion of the book, but at least there was no sex nor profanity. I think the author's most exquisite moment was when he wrote about the changes that occurred as times changed in the U.S. and the priveleged classes moved onward. That is probably what earned him an award. And what of the story? I would say that the story is engaging enough, but I am not particularly fond of the ending. I did appreciate the reality of the story. I suppose that explains the ending. Realistic stories often have no conclusion. I was provided with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I was not financially compensated, and all opinions are 100 percent mine.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bookworm95AO More than 1 year ago
The book is entertaining and relatable. It also paints a clear picture of society during the turn of the century. Anyone would enjoy this book!
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