The Memory of Trees

The Memory of Trees

by F.G. Cottam
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Hardcover(First World Publication)

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Overview

The Memory of Trees by F.G. Cottam

Billionaire Saul Abercrombie owns a vast tract of land on the Pembrokeshire coast.  His plan is to restore the ancient forest that covered the area before medieval times, and he employs young arboreal expert Tom Curtis to oversee this massively ambitious project. 
Saul believes that restoring the land to its original state will rekindle those spirits that folklore insists once inhabited his domain. But the re-planting of the forest will revive an altogether darker and more dangerous entity – and Saul’s employee Tom will find himself engaging in an epic, ancient battle between good and evil.  A battle in which there can be only one survivor.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780727883155
Publisher: Severn House Publishers
Publication date: 10/01/2013
Edition description: First World Publication
Pages: 256
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Former journalist F G Cottam is the author of several highly-acclaimed supernatural thrillers. He lives in Surrey, England.

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The Memory of Trees 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
BuriedUnderBooks More than 1 year ago
We have a collective unease when it comes to deep forests and that unease has pervaded our storytelling world for a long time. From Hansel and Gretel abandoned in the woods to Dorothy's trek with her companions to the simple stories of British highwaymen, we've been preconditioned to prefer open space. With that mindset, I anticipated a good scary tale in The Memory of Trees. Alas, it didn't quite pan out that way. The idea of megalomaniacal men trying to manipulate sorcery to obtain good health or immortality is not a new idea and it's a serviceable motive for Saul Abercrombie's desire to rebuild a vast forest on his land but I found his total disregard for what might happen to his daughter rather unlikely. Even more so was everyone's lack of serious alarm when confronted with abnormal and threatening situations. As an example, Tom Curtis and Sam Freemantle go to a location called Gibbet Mourning where they observe something that is undeniably menacing and actually begins to "rustle and shiver" and make sighing noises when Sam approaches it. Should I find myself in such a scenario, I'd run for the nearest collection of people and hide in a dark corner but Sam and Tom calmly talk about hauntings and agree that they don't like the place. That's it. That's also pretty unbelievable. The growing malevolence is made very obvious but, somehow, it didn't really make much of an impact on me, possibly because the cast of characters is too big and too widespread, making it a little difficult to remember exactly who they are. If you can't connect with a character, it's hard to really care about what happens to them. When very strange things begin to occur with the plantings, there's little reaction beyond noting the strange things. That lack of reaction to practically everything that goes on in this story is essentially why it didn't work for me because it meant there was no real tension. Despite my lack of enthusiasm for The Memory of Trees, I enjoyed Mr. Cottam's style and obvious ability to write and will try something else by him. I do think other readers would enjoy this book more if they take logic and normal human behavior out of it and just read it as a tale of ancient evil come to life.