The Mind's Eye

The Mind's Eye

by Oliver Sacks
3.6 46

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Overview

The Mind's Eye by Oliver Sacks

In The Mind’s Eye, Oliver Sacks tells the stories of people who are able to navigate the world and communicate with others despite losing what many of us consider indispensable senses and abilities: the power of speech, the capacity to recognize faces, the sense of three-dimensional space, the ability to read, the sense of sight. For all of these people, the challenge is to adapt to a radically new way of being in the world.

There is Lilian, a concert pianist who becomes unable to read music and is eventually unable even to recognize everyday objects, and Sue, a neurobiologist who has never seen in three dimensions, until she suddenly acquires stereoscopic vision in her fifties.

There is Pat, who reinvents herself as a loving grandmother and active member of her community, despite the fact that she has aphasia and cannot utter a sentence, and Howard, a prolific novelist who must find a way to continue his life as a writer even after a stroke destroys his ability to read.

And there is Dr. Sacks himself, who tells the story of his own eye cancer and the bizarre and disconcerting effects of losing vision to one side.

Sacks explores some very strange paradoxes—people who can see perfectly well but cannot recognize their own children, and blind people who become hyper-visual or who navigate by “tongue vision.” He also considers more fundamental questions: How do we see? How do we think? How important is internal imagery—or vision, for that matter? Why is it that, although writing is only five thousand years old, humans have a universal, seemingly innate, potential for reading?

The Mind’s Eye
is a testament to the complexity of vision and the brain and to the power of creativity and adaptation. And it provides a whole new perspective on the power of language and communication, as we try to imagine what it is to see with another person’s eyes, or another person’s mind.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307473028
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/04/2011
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 235,626
Product dimensions: 7.92(w) x 5.28(h) x 0.88(d)

About the Author

Oliver Sacks is a practicing physician and the author of ten books, including Musicophilia, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, and Awakenings (which inspired the Oscar-nominated film). He lives in New York City, where he is a professor of neurology and psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center and the first Columbia University Artist.

Hometown:

New York, New York

Date of Birth:

1933

Place of Birth:

London, England

Education:

B.M., B.Ch., Queen's College, Oxford, 1958

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The Mind's Eye 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 46 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love reading his case studies
dicken--15--dog More than 1 year ago
I did not enjoy this book as well as some of Oliver Sacks' other books. I did learn a lot about the author and his visual problems. He certainly has accomplished a great deal with limited vision. I learned a lot about the ability of the human brain to compensate for visual loss.
SharynR More than 1 year ago
I have read almost all of Oliver Sacks' books and loved them.
janet52 More than 1 year ago
Dr. Sacks explains fascinating ways our brains behave, or should I say, misbehave, and how some  individuals have learned to cope and make the best of a situation. He includes his own "malfunctions", but the problem here  is he goes way overboard about his own  case history of developing  melanoma of the eye. I could have done without his daily  "dear diary" entries and settled with a  summary of his visual changes. And I never did understand the fuss about his stereoscopic vision.   Unfortunately I recently heard his melanoma has returned and is inoperable.  He has done a fine job of making some peculiar  medical conditions  interesting and understandable to many lay persons.  His writings will be missed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an interesting book and I learned quite a bit about how the brain works. But it was little hard to stay interrested for the whole book; a little too detailed in some areas. I would have liked more human interest, less medical and science detail.
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