The Miner's Canary
The Miner's Canary

The Miner's Canary

by Lani GUINIER, Gerald Torres

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780674038035
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Publication date: 06/30/2009
Series: The Nathan I. Huggins Lectures
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 400
File size: 600 KB

About the Author

Gerald Torres is H.O. Head Centennial Professor in Real Property Law, University of Texas Law School.

Table of Contents

CONTENTS Prologue 1 Political Race and Magical Realism 2 A Critique of Colorblindness 3 Race as a Political Space 4 Rethinking Conventions of Zero-Sum Power 5 Enlisting Race to Resist Hierarchy 6 The Problem Democracy Is Supposed to Solve 7 Whiteness of a Different Color? 8 Watching the Canary Notes Acknowledgments Index

What People are Saying About This

Derrick A. Bell

As the stunningly insightful stories in The Miner's Canary make clear, the primary racial challenge of the twenty-first century is to convince white people that social ills adversely affecting people of color disadvantage whites as well. Lani Guinier and Gerald Torres argue persuasively that progress can come through cooperative efforts for reform rather than race-related resistance to it.
Derrick A. Bell, author of Faces at the Bottom of the Well: The Permanence of Racism

The Miner's Canary is thoughtful, provocative, and timely. It persuasively develops the idea of "political race," a concept that identifies racial literacy as a new way to think about social change in American society. This book will challenge the very way we think about race, justice, and the political system in America.

Ian F. Haney López

Lani Guinier and Gerald Torres sing a powerful song in lyrical, accessible, sophisticated tones: Race exists, race positively shapes identity, and organizing around race can save our society. To those who want to join their voices to what must become a swelling harmony, here are the first stanzas. For those afraid of the future, here is a hymn of hope.
Ian F. Haney López, author of White by Law: The Legal Construction of Race

Gerald Frug

Rejecting the unacceptable choice between colorblindness and identity politics, Lani Guinier and Gerald Torres show us how race consciousness can mobilize people across racial categories to confront structural injustice on issues ranging from education to union organizing, from voting rights to prisons. Inspiring, learned, and compellingly written.
Gerald Frug, author of City Making: Building Communities Without Building Walls

Nancy L. Rosenblum

The Miner's Canary is conceptually imaginative and politically inspiring. It is generously inclusive where other accounts of race and power are harshly exclusive. Lani Guinier and Gerald Torres combine sober analysis and models of democratic activism.
Nancy L. Rosenblum, author of Liberalism and the Moral Life

Michael C. Dawson

In this outstanding, trenchant, and ultimately uplifting book, Lani Guinier and Gerald Torres demonstrate how a racial order still profoundly structures the life chances of all Americans, and convincingly argue that racially based social movements have historically, and can again, promote a truly egalitarian society. The Miner's Canary is sure to become required reading for all those who seek to understand the racial divide as well as those who care about the future of the American polity.
Michael C. Dawson, author of Behind the Mule: Race and Class in African-American Politics

Nell Irvin Painter

Compassion permeates this thoughtful analysis. Lani Guinier and Gerald Torres show us how Americans of all races and ethnicities can draw upon African Americans' positive racial identity, which is rooted in solidarity and the ability to see problems that are systemic. Yes, we can advance democracy by all becoming "black," in the sense of building upon our culture's race consciousness.
Nell Irvin Painter, author of Sojourner Truth: A Life, A Symbol

Jane J. Mansbridge

I recommend this book to every thoughtful U.S. citizen. We all need to get a better analytic grip on the phenomenon of "race." We all need to rethink outdated democratic systems. We all need help in organizing human action across lines of division. The Miner's Canary shows how the experiences of people of color are a key diagnostic tool, drawing attention to flaws in the existing system and galvanizing practical ways to change it for the better. Guinier and Torres have got it exactly right.
Jane J. Mansbridge, author of Beyond Adversary Democracy

Henry Louis Gates

The Miner's Canary is thoughtful, provocative, and timely. It persuasively develops the idea of "political race," a concept that identifies racial literacy as a new way to think about social change in American society. This book will challenge the very way we think about race, justice, and the political system in America.
Henry Louis Gates, Jr., author of Colored People: A Memoir

Melissa Nobles

Guinier and Torres issue a clarion call for the progressive possibilities of racial politics in the twenty-first century. The Miner's Canary convincingly demonstrates the positive role that racial identification has played and can continue to play in expanding, deepening, and enriching American democracy.
Melissa Nobles, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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The Miner's Canary: Enlisting Race, Resisting Power, Transforming Democracy 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
dpbrewster on LibraryThing 5 months ago
The third greatest law book ever written. And a shout out to my homie GT.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
A beautiful outline for race-centered policymaking and the valuation and celebration of diversity in our society. A must read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Being a sociology student I anticipated reading a race realtions book written by lawyers. I was disappointed. While problems were defined the analysis and explanation was seriously lacking. I would be interested to know what research guidelines were followed. I would borrow from a friend and buy a more enlightening book on race relations in our country. My time would have been better spent watching ice melt. If you want a good book, buy Amazing Grace -unimpressed reader in Texas