The Moroccan Girl: A Novel

The Moroccan Girl: A Novel

by Charles Cumming

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781250129956
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Publication date: 02/12/2019
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 110,253
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

CHARLES CUMMING is the author of the Alec Milius books and the Thomas Kell books, A Foreign Country, A Colder War, and A Divided Spy, as well as the New York Times bestselling thriller The Trinity Six and others. He lives in London.

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The Moroccan Girl 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
JReppy 3 months ago
Overall, this is a good book. Ivan Simakov, Russian idealist, created an international resistance movement called Resurrection to target and expose individuals in positions of influence or power -- journalists, bankers, politicians, lobbyists -- who espoused, promoted, or enabled illiberal ideas, policies, and governments. Resurrection was intended to be different from Antifa, Black Lives Matter, Occupy, and other groups, who were only interested in civil disorder for its own sake and virtue signaling without bringing about any meaningful change. However, the Resurrection movement did not retain its nonviolence policy, instead resorting to terrorist activities. Simakov died in Moscow when a home-made bomb detonated early. His former girlfriend, Lara Bartok, had grown disillusioned with the movement and had left him and disappeared, but the intelligence services of multiple nations were trying to find her. Enter C.K. (Kit) Carradine, writer of spy novels and son of a former British spy whose career was cut short when his name was among those given to the Russians by Kim Philby. Out for a walk, he is approached by a man who identifies himself as Robert Mantis and implies he works for British intelligence (the Service). Kit is participating in a literary festival in Marrakesh, Morocco. Mantis wants him to make contact with agents in Morocco, pass along some items, and keep an eye out for a woman the Service was trying to find, who they believed was in Morocco, and who had a well-known love of books that might make her risk attending the literary festival. Kit had a perfect cover, as he could claim he was doing research for his next book if asked about his activities/behavior. Kit was seduced by the idea that he would be helping his country, obtaining priceless first-hand knowledge for future books, and the Service might seek to utilize him for future projects if this trip went well. However, things quickly become more complicated and confusing, as Kit finds out the true identity of the woman for whom he is supposed to be on the lookout (Lara Bartok), meets people who seem overly interested in him and his activities, attracts the attention of someone he suspects is CIA, and questions whether he can really trust Mantis. Interwoven in the story is a series of interviews/interrogations of Lara Bartok by British intelligence and the CIA, which makes it clear that Kit and Bartok eventually meet. The Resurrection backstory is creative and potentially plausible. The English writer recruited as a spy is a predictable plotline, as it is based on historical events, with the author having Kit think about other writers, such as Somerset Maugham and Graham Greene, who had worked as support agents for the Service. The characters are interesting. The story has plenty of twists and turns, including some rather significant surprises late in the book. There is a point in the book where it becomes too cliché and I feared I was going to be ultimately disappointed, but the author manages to return the story to solid ground and craft a strong (albeit somewhat rushed) finish. If you like thrillers, especially ones that revolve around current events and offer commentary on the state of society, but also contain plenty of action and intrigue, this might be the book for you. I am glad I had the opportunity to read a copy of the e-book through NetGalley in exchange for a review.
brf1948 3 months ago
The Moroccan Girl is a very timely thriller, one of those where anything could happen, with just a little slip here, a misstep there. The problems being highlighted are many that we face every day. I thoroughly enjoyed the moxie of Lara Bartok, and found the novelist Kit Carradine a sympathetic character, as well, though perhaps too gullible. This is one of those stories where we do not actually notice the dangling rope that is going to hang them out to dry. I did decide to make a chart of characters after the second time I began this book, but that may be a problem only with the ARC.... I appreciated the way the group Resurrection began, with a plan to expose those responsible for the political woes entrapping the nations of the world, to target them individually and let the public handle the repercussions. Of course, as with most groups touting non-violent protest, things will eventually get out of hand. This was a story initially hard to grasp, and then impossible to let go. I can enthusiastically recommend to friends and family. I received a free electronic copy of this timely spy thriller from Netgalley, Charles Cummings, and St. Martin's Press in exchange for an honest review. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me.
Dedee1 3 months ago
It took a few pages to get into the flow of the 'here and now and then' but was soon a page turner. Well written spy mystery that has political tones. One might even wonder if such events occur or have occurred with the general population unawares. I usually don't read this genre but I thoroughly enjoyed the book. This book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley for an honest review. The opinions expressed are my own. Thank you for the adventure!
Bonnie Franks 3 months ago
I like spy novels, and I enjoyed this one with a twist. This book has numerous characters and, it being a spy novel, at most points it is difficult to figure out who is a good guy and who is not. Almost everyone is not quite what they seem. The main character, Kit, is an author and writes spy novels. He is approached by M16 to perform a service while he attends a literary festival in Morocco. Since he writes this type of thing, he decides to go for it, as it seems a simple task. Wrong. This is where the action starts and keeps on going. I enjoyed reading this book as it is well-written and keeps you guessing. I really wanted to know the answers to all of my questions along the way. I hope the characters appreciated my concern for them. If you like spy novels, read this one. It has dashes of romance scattered here and there. A good read. Thank you to #St. Martin's Press and #NetGalley.com for my copies.
gisellsamaniego 3 months ago
This novel seemed like it never really took off. I kept waiting for it to “begin” but it never really did until perhaps the last ten pages. While it was a bit reminiscent of LeCarre it seemed “amateurish” by comparison. Most of what transpires is implausible in that it’s unlikely someone would be as naive and impulsive in the situation presented. That being said, it was intriguing as long as everything is taken at face value. It started a bit slow and gradually picked up pace but the frustration of the main character’s decisions made it difficult to truly immerse in the story.
Anonymous 3 months ago
Reknowed author of spy novels, Kit Carradine, is approached by a British intelligence officer to deliver some items to people in Morocco, where he is headed to speak at a literary festival. Kit soon gets in over his head while dealing with British, American, and Russian spies and trying to protect a woman on the run in Morocco. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys spy novels. It's a pretty classic story of who can you trust, delivering flash drives, etc. but also brings in a really current take, referencing (without names) Obama, Trump, and the current division in world politics.
Ratbruce 3 months ago
With strong characters and a fast paced plot, this thriller/spy novel kept me guessing right to the end.. A spy novelist is enlisted to complete an espionage assignment which creates a high level of intrigue and makes the main character's ever changing conclusions about the people he encounters very believable. No one is who they seem and he is constantly shifting his allegiance as well as his sense of whom to trust. Highly recommended.
Shortcake5 3 months ago
What happens when a Spy Thriller author gets involved in something that resembles his Novels? The Moroccan Girl is that story. Kit Carradine is a famous author recruited by a strange man whom he believes will help him view Carridine's Father's world and the excitement Carradine always believed his father had with his job. Little Does Carradine know that it isn't all fun and games. I have read a handful of Espionage Thriller's before and haven't always enjoyed them. The Morrocan Girl was not like that. I did, however, take many chapters to feel as if I wanted to continue reading. So don't give this book up before you reach midway. This book is like Owen' Wilson's No Escape meets Casablanca. Classical and riveting all at the same time. I recommend it. The only reason I gave it 3 stars is for the slow start. :)
Rhonda-Runner1 3 months ago
Author Kit Carradine is a spy novelist who was asked to find a woman who is a dangerous fugitive with ties to terrorism in Morocco. The woman, Lara Bartok, is beautiful, intelligent and very complex woman who Carradine is supposed to deliver a new passport to. This is a very engaging spy thriller with a very intriguing plot. Thank you to St. Martin's Press for the advanced reader copy. I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves spy thrillers.