The Mystery of Drear House: The Conclusion of the Dies Drear Chronicle

The Mystery of Drear House: The Conclusion of the Dies Drear Chronicle

by Virginia Hamilton

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Overview

A black family living in the house of long-dead abolitionist Dies Drear must decide what to do with his stupendous treasure, hidden for one hundred years in a cavern near their home.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780590956277
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date: 02/01/1997
Series: Dies Drear Chronicle Series , #2
Pages: 217
Product dimensions: 5.32(w) x 7.62(h) x 0.49(d)
Lexile: 540L (what's this?)
Age Range: 9 - 12 Years

About the Author

Virginia Hamilton's books have won many awards and honors. One of these, the first book ever to win both the John Newbery Medal and the National Book Award, M.C. Higgins, the Great, was also the recipent of the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award and the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award. The Planet of Junior Brown was a Newbery Honor Book in 1971, and four of Virginia Hamilton's other books have been named Notable Children's books by the American Library Association.

Ms. Hamilton is married to Arnold Adoff, who is a distinguished poet and anthologist. They live with their two children in Ohio.

Date of Birth:

March 12, 1936

Date of Death:

February 19, 2002

Place of Birth:

Yellow Springs, Ohio

Place of Death:

Yellow Springs, Ohio

Education:

Attended Antioch College, Ohio State University, and the New School for Social Research

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The cool days of October descended upon the region. Thomas Small and his papa had taken to the woods to hunt or hike for hours on the hill above the bleak house of Dies Drear. But then, suddenly, it turned cold. Mr. Small had little free time from teaching at the college. On weekends he cataloged the wealth that had belonged to the long-dead abolitionist Dies Eddington Drear. There was a stupendous treasure hidden for a hundred years in a secret cavern within the hillside. Thomas left his rifle at home. He spent the time playing with his little brothers, or by himself, or with his friend Pesty Darrow.

Today he had on a sweater and his fleece-lined jacket over it. The air was brisk. The Drear house seen from the hilltop reminded him of a giant crow frozen on its nest. He wasn't sure yet whether he liked living in that house. He was usually on his guard. Sometimes he felt something strange was near.

Something unseen but listening behind the Walls, he thought. He wasn't afraid, just wary whenever he was in the house by himself.

Scaring away mean neighbors, Darrow men, before they had the chance to discover the treasure hadn't rid him of the feeling either. But what was the use of worrying? It was his papa's dream to live in a house that had been a station on the Underground Railroad.

Pesty Darrow was with him today. They'd become friends even though she was a Darrow. Darrows had adopted her when she was an infant. Thomas supposed she was loyal to them since they were the only family she'd known.

She's loyal to us, too, hethought, and to Mr. Pluto.

Mr. Pluto had been the caretaker of the Drear house until the Smalls moved in eight months ago. Old Pluto lived in a cave on the other side of the hill. He and Pesty had kept the secret of the great cavern from everyone. Pesty had known about the secret treasure long before Thomas had. She'd kept it from her brothers and her father, even from her youngest brother, Macky, who wasn't as mean or sour as the others.

But how long can she be loyal to two sets of folk who are like day is to night? Thomas wondered. How long before she makes a slip or the older Darrow men figure out there is treasure deep under the hillside?

Darrows had been hunting for hidden treasure in the maze of underground slave escape tunnels of the region's hills for generations.

Papa's worried they will get bold again, Thomas thought, and try some way to get us off Drear lands. He's afraid there might be cave-ins, too.

"Be quicker if we use the backyard of Drear house," Pesty said.

Thomas had to smile. She was talking about the quick way to her home. Whenever they were out tramping together, she would want Thomas to come see her brother. Every now and then she told Macky, "Mr. Thomas wants to see you." Macky snorted and said, "Don't you call no boy mister, Pesty. He's just Thomas, like I am just Macky."

Thomas was careful not to be seen by Darrow men out in the open close to their property. He might overstep their boundary and give them a clear excuse to chase him or to cross the Drear boundary.

Instead of the Drear backyard, he took the longer, out-of-the-way route over the hill because he did want to run into Macky in the woods. He had a vague hope that they might still get to know each other. After school he would see Macky going off in the trees. Lately it seemed that Macky allowed Thomas to catch up with him, almost, before he sauntered away.

Today it had started snowing again. Light snows came now one after the other to the hillside, to the woods and all the land.

"You be glad your grandmom is coming?" Pesty said. "Mr. Pluto told me she was."

"Well, she's not my grandmom," Thomas said as they tramped smartly single file. "She's my great-grand-mother Jeffers. First name is Rhetty. And she's coming to stay. I'm glad of it, too."

"Is she where you used to be?" Pesty asked.

"In North Carolina, yes," he said.

"Do you miss her?"

"Well, it won't feel right here until we're all together again," he said.

"Does she know about the house of Dies Dreat?" Pesty asked.

"Pesty, you haven't told anyone about the you-know-what, have you?" he said, meaning the cavern of treasure.

"No!" she answered.

"Not even Macky. No one?"

"No!" she said. "I haven't told a soul. I wouldn't." But she sounded anxious. Her voice whined uncertainly.

What was it about Pesty lately? Something Thomas couldn't put his finger on. They were together so much, and he thought he knew her well.

On weekends they often helped his father and old Pluto in the great cavern, where they polished the priceless glass. Pesty, who had taken care of the glass from the time she was five or six, suddenly had butterfingers. She'd dropped a glass spoon and a rare nineteenth-century bottle. Both had smashed on the cavern floor.

Now Thomas made a zigzag trail around trees. Snowflakes slapped thinly, like tiny footsteps around them. He was heading east toward the Darrow- and Carr-owned parts of the woods. Carr people had been friendly when Thomas's family first arrived. Their land bordered Darrow's to the south. They bordered Drear lands on Drear's southeast corner. Darrow land was right by Drear lands, bordering them on Darrow's north and west.

Thomas had been thinking so hard he hadn't noticed that Pesty's footsteps had stopped. He recognized an absence suddenly, and he felt lonely for his great-grandmother and the high mountains of home.

The Mystery of Drear House. Copyright © by Virginia Hamilton. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

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The Mystery of Drear House: The Conclusion of the Dies Drear Chronicle 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i liked this book because not only did it teach you a little bit about S.S., it also held a sense of mystery. i think that it had a bit to much info though.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i wouldnt say it was my favorite book and i had to read it for school...and it was one of the top 5 books read for school
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this book has a great ending and is a pretty good book,but I also think it could have been better and it wasn't as good as it sounded.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this story! A great Conclusion for The House of Dies Drear.
gwenn2ns on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is a very exciting adventure that goes by pretty fast. I would recommend to people who enjoy realistic fiction . Virginia Hamilton does a fine job of putting this book together. The ending is one of the best parts of this book. I recommend this book to all 10-15 year old children.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was a thriller! I read it in two days. It had me fallin out my bed! Staying up late just to read it. It was interesting. I was just reading it for my reading group. Now I want the book for myself. To keep as my own.That book was so good. There`s so many words to describe it. But I cant write no more. Good Job Virgina Hamliton!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was an alright book. Well, actually my friend read it for our ELA class and she said that it was the worst book she ever read. She said that it nade no sense, until she found out that it was the conclusion. She stil hated it anyway!