The Myth of Persecution: How Early Christians Invented a Story of Martyrdom

The Myth of Persecution: How Early Christians Invented a Story of Martyrdom

by Candida Moss
3.3 6

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The Myth of Persecution: How Early Christians Invented a Story of Martyrdom 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The 1 star reviewer hasn't read this book as the very first thing the author does is talk about persecution in egypt. This book is not about contemporary persecution, it's about the early church. It's fascinating, informative, and very easy to read. I recommend it to anyone interested in history, christianity, and persecution. 
KathleenBrady More than 1 year ago
Candida Moss presents a much-needed clear-eyed presentation of the legitimate, fact-based challenges of the early Church and why the idea of Christian-as-victim is so harmful to Christians as well as others.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A good read for the religious and atheist, alike. The book reveals the 'victim' mentality of early Christians and how they used it to their advantage long ago and still today. The scholarship of this work is excellent. I look forward to more from this author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another Jew-approved mainstream book that is an attack upon the integrity and truthfulness of Christianity. The claim of this book can more accurately be applied to the Jews: they have always whined about persecution throughout the centuries but we're never supposed to ask WHY they have been so subjected.  
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Funny, the posted reviews don't mention the persecutions going on today in the Middle East, China, Africa, and mildly, in a marginalizing manner, Canada, the U.S. and Europe. Nor do they mention the results of the French Revolution, the persecutions in Russia, the Spanish Civil War, and in Mexico under Calles. I am unaware that it has ever been argued that the Roman persecutions lasted 300 years straight. But that there were persecutions under Emperors such as Nero, Domitian, Trajan, Decius, Diocletian Julian, and others cannot be seriously argued against.