The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter (Glasgow Trilogy #1)

The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter (Glasgow Trilogy #1)

by Malcolm Mackay

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Overview

IT'S EASY TO KILL A MAN. IT'S HARD TO KILL A MAN WELL.

A twenty-nine-year-old man lives alone in his Glasgow flat. The telephone rings; a casual conversation, but behind this a job offer.

The clues are there if you know to look for them. He is an expert. A loner. Freelance. Another job is another job, but what if this organization wants more?

A meeting at a club. An offer. A target: Lewis Winter, a necessary sacrifice that will be only the first step in an all-out war between crime syndicates the likes of which hasn't been seen for decades.

It's easy to kill a man. It's hard to kill a man well. People who do it well know this. People who do it badly find out the hard way. The hard way has consequences.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316337304
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 04/21/2015
Series: Glasgow Trilogy Series , #1
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 224,463
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Malcolm Mackay's acclaimed debut series, the Glasgow Trilogy, has been nominated for countless international prizes. The first of the series, The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter, was shortlisted for the CWA John Creasey New Blood Dagger Award, the Theakson Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Award, and longlisted for the the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger for Best Thriller of the Year Award. Mackay was born in Stornoway on Scotland's Isle of Lewis, where he still lives.

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The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
gloriafeit More than 1 year ago
From the publisher: “A twenty-nine-year-old man lives alone in his Glasgow flat. The telephone rings; a casual conversation, but behind this a job offer. The clues are there if you know to look for them. He is an expert. A loner. Freelance. Another job is another job, but what is this organization wants more? A meeting at a club. An offer. A brief. A target. Lewis Winter, a necessary sacrifice that will be only the first step in an all-out war between crime syndicates the likes of which hasn’t been seen for decades. It’s hard to kill a man well. People who do it well know this. People who do it badly find out the hard way. The hard way has consequences.” So the reader is introduced to Calum MacLean, a hitman, who on the opening page is reading a novel by Somerset Maugham when the telephone call described above interrupts his reading. He is the one chosen by a local crime boss to take care of the job in question. The job itself is described in fascinating detail. Calum follows the target to a club to start to plan the act for which he has been hired, where he is self-described as follows: “He isn’t deemed attractive to women, no matter how dark it is.” He is a professional, after all, and he goes about his ‘job’ (his contract, if you will) in a thoroughly professional manner. As do most of the characters in the book, including the cops on the case (well, most of them anyway – the exceptions being the ones in the pockets of the criminals). “Calum has never been arrested, no convictions, never seen the inside of a jail cell. He’s been in the business for ten years. He won’t gloat about avoiding arrest until he’s retired.” What follows is a fascinating, wonderfully written tale from a standpoint seldom seen in your run-of-the-mill crime novel. The traits sought by the man hiring Calum are: “Don’t hire someone who’s been too busy. Don’t hire someone who hasn’t been working at all. Not too hot, not too cold, but just right. A Goldilocks employee.” Interestingly, p.o.v. moves from one character to another and, as mentioned above, each with the same traits of professionalism. Whose p.o.v. it is isn’t always immediately clear from chapter to chapter, which one would think would be distracting, but seemed to this reader to only make things a bit more interesting. A list of characters and their “connections” provided at the beginning of the book proves helpful. Calum has been recommended for the job by Frank MacLeod, the man usually chosen for this kind of job, now past sixty and recovering from hip replacement surgery. A plus for the reader at the end of the book is an excerpt from the next book in the trilogy, in which apparently MacLeod is the headline act once again. This is a wonderful novel, highly recommended, and I can’t waot to read the next in the trilogy, “How a Gunman Says Goodbye.”
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