The New Digital Age: Reshaping the Future of People, Nations and Business

The New Digital Age: Reshaping the Future of People, Nations and Business

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The New Digital Age: Reshaping the Future of People, Nations and Business 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
popscipopulizer More than 1 year ago
*A full executive summary of this book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com on or before Tuesday, May 21, 2013. Many of us living in the developed world have come to rely very heavily on digital technology (including the internet and our mobile/smart devices) in both our personal and professional lives—indeed, for many of us, our relationship with our various screens is nothing short of addiction. And we are not the only ones who are increasingly becoming connected. We are also beginning to hook up our various man-made systems (such as our infrastructural systems and financial systems) to the internet as well. Given how radically digital technology has transformed our lives, it is easy to forget just how recently this trend has come upon us; for, indeed, all of this change has occurred entirely in the past 15 to 20 years. This is significant because it reminds us that the age of connectivity is but in its infancy, and that most of the changes are yet to come. This is true for us here in the developed world, but is even more so the case for those living in the developing world, where almost 5 billion people are expected to go from no connectivity to full connectivity within the next 20 years. While it may well be the case that the overall impact of the connectivity revolution will be enormously beneficial, we would be fool to think that the impact will be none but positive. With forces such as criminals, rebel groups, terrorists and rogue states prepared to take advantage of the new technology, the connectivity revolution poses some very serious challenges as well. Google executive Eric Schmidt and U.S. policy and media expert Jared Cohen are particularly well-placed to assess how all of the upcoming changes will play out, and in their new book The New Digital Age: Reshaping the Future of People, Nations, and Business the two let us in on their ruminations and prognostications. Beginning closer to home, the authors chart how the new digital age stands to increase our efficiency and offer new opportunities for both business and leisure. To begin with, the two argue that most of our day to day routines and workload will be streamlined by way of being hooked up to the internet and aided by various artificial intelligence machines. Over and above this, consider some of the extravagant possibilities: imagine attending a 9 a.m. teleconference with business associates from around the world in a 3D virtual space, where each individual’s comments are translated into your native language near perfectly, and near instantaneously. In the evening you enter a different 3D virtual space that captures a sporting event in real-time. After that you enjoy a holographic recreation of your wedding with your spouse. Though the book does explore domestic matters, it is mostly focused on how the digital age will impact international relations and conflicts. The only faults I see in the book are that it occasionally indulges in speculation that borders on fear-mongering, and there are several cases wherein the authors do not explore their reasons for believing why a particular trend will emerge (instead favoring bald and sweeping statements). All in all the two authors have a very unique and privileged vantage point from which to view things, and it is very interesting to look in on their thoughts. A full executive summary of the book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com, on or before Tuesday, May 21; a podcast discussion of the book will be available shortly thereafter.
Online_Adjunct More than 1 year ago
The authors are big shots at Google, so their knowledge and opinions about the effects of connectedness on privacy and security and how technology is rapidly changing the world is valuable. However, they make the same points over and over. If a Readers Digest condensed version comes out, it may be worth reading, but this sucker needed very much to be condensed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen present a comprehensive, account of how the world will become increasingly connected, more subject to having our secrets revealed, and our lives on display for anyone to access, without our permission, or even knowledge of same. All information will be ultimately available to anyone about everything and everybody. And there's not much one can do about it. Bank accounts will be increasingly vulnerable to unauthorized entry, as well as any personal data we may have shared from years ago as reckless teenagers through existing social media. Any safeguards will be compromised by adept hackers. From the author's perspective, that's the way it is, get used to it. I daresay I'm glad I won't be around for same. And there's security in that.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hmpf.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked it, i got it from the library and enjoyed it but wouldnt recommend buying it. Was very entertianing though
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I write fiction and biographys, Im in ninth grade. I liston to rock. If get this job I'll be greatful. Thanks for your time.