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The Newcomer's Guide to Winning Local Elections
     

The Newcomer's Guide to Winning Local Elections

5.0 1
by Terry A. Amrhein
 
The Newcomer's Guide to Winning Local Elections contains practical information on how to win elections in cities, towns and villages. The Newcomer's Guide to Winning Local Elections was developed for those who are running, or are considering running, for a local office. The book is loaded with useful practical suggestions for both the new comer and the experienced

Overview

The Newcomer's Guide to Winning Local Elections contains practical information on how to win elections in cities, towns and villages. The Newcomer's Guide to Winning Local Elections was developed for those who are running, or are considering running, for a local office. The book is loaded with useful practical suggestions for both the new comer and the experienced politician. The Newcomer's Guide to Winning Local Elections includes:

How to develop campaign strategies Information you must have for the campaign Ways to get nominated for office How to conduct Door to Door campaigning Why is Door to Door so important How to effectively organize Door to Door campaigns How to develop and use Road Signs The importance of Campaign Flyers How to develop campaign flyers Ways to entice the voter to read the campaign literature Methods for Campaign Financing for small town elections Management methods for the campaign What to do during Election Day The Newcomer's Guide to Winning Local Elections also contains a summary of the New York State Election Laws pertaining to electing candidates to office.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780595009916
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
08/14/2000
Pages:
124
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.29(d)

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5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
So you've got an itch you can't seem to scratch. You've been bitten by the bug......the political bug. You believe you're as good or better than some of the elected persons currently holding office in your town. You're fired up. You believe you can make a difference and now want to run for election. Great! But wait!! First, you need Mr. Amrhein's book. In fact, you need to memorize it before your campaign turns into a naive, quixotic trip to defeat and humiliation. Amrhein spares the fledgling office seeker a lot of mistakes and heartaches and 'what ifs'. He's no theorist pontificating from some academic ivory tower. He's been there.....he's done that. He relates his experiences and what he's learned from managing five campaigns for his wife in the past seven years. The last two (in 1996 and 2000) were winners! He not only gives good advice, he obviously follows it. Amrhein's book is not only a guide, it's a story.......perhaps even a love story. In that context, I've committed the cardinal sin of revealing the ending when I told you he (and she) won their election. But that's really okay, because the point is HOW he and his candidate wife, Cindy, pulled it off. You must know the story in order to appreciate and follow the guide. The narrative is essential in establishing Mr. Amrhein's hard-earned credentials. Principally, this book is a guide for the newcomer. It's for that person seeking elective office in their town or city for the first time. It's especially aimed at that individual who doesn't yet have name recognition and doesn't have significant financial or major party support. It's definitely for the underdog. The candidate will learn the most effective ways to campaign, how to develop issues and get them across, how to gather support, how to raise necessary funds and how to use them prudently. The Amrheins, it should be noted, ran their campaigns with a major party endorsement, but with virtually no organizational or financial support from that party. A lot of towns, even cities, are controlled and dominated and often inhibited by one political party. The other party, if it really exists at all, is sometimes an apathetic, benign presence at best and, at worst, a joke. The Amrheins ran in such a town where the opposition party maintains a three to one registration advantage, and hadn't lost an elective office in over twenty years. Formidable odds? You bet. The surmounting of those impediments is what makes their ultimate success so significant, and, therefore, what makes this guide so reliable and necessary. Henry R. Agens