The Order of Things: How Everything in the World Is Organized into Hierarchies, Structures, and Pecking Orders

The Order of Things: How Everything in the World Is Organized into Hierarchies, Structures, and Pecking Orders

by Barbara Ann Kipfer

Paperback(Revised Paperback)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780375719691
Publisher: Random House Information Group
Publication date: 09/18/2001
Edition description: Revised Paperback
Pages: 416
Product dimensions: 7.38(w) x 9.19(h) x 0.84(d)

About the Author

Barbara Ann Kipfer has prepared classification systems for the Yellow Pages of three major corporations and for two major encyclopedia companies, Grolier and Columbia University Press. Her publications include 14,000 Things To Be Happy About, Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Sisson's World and Expression Locator, 1,400 Things for Kids To Be Happy About, and Workbook on Lexicography. Kipfer received her Ph.D. and M.Phil. in Linguistics from the University of Exeter.

Table of Contents

Outline of Contentsvii
Prefacexxiii
1.Earth Sciences & Geography3
2.Life Sciences35
3.Physical Sciences79
4.Technology93
5.Mathematics & Measurements117
6.Religion135
7.History167
8.Society & Social Institutions219
9.Business & Economics261
10.The Arts279
11.Domestic Life301
12.Sports and Recreation323
13.General Knowledge & Philosophy355
Bibliography377
Index381

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The Order of Things: How Everything in the World Is Organized into Hierarchies, Structures, and Pecking Orders 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
IreneF on LibraryThing 19 days ago
I was horribly disappointed with this book. It is not about the order of things. It's a reference book of lists of things. And it's not even accurate. It may have been useful when published a decade ago, but it's been superseded by the internet.
chellerystick on LibraryThing 5 months ago
Many of us heard of this book by reading David Sedaris' memoir Me Talk Pretty One Day. What the book consists of is lists, lists, and more lists assembled by an experienced lexicographer of ideas: knots, alphabets, architectural elements, leaders of state, anatomy, and more. The only thing keeping me from endorsing this book as a five-star must-have is the number of mistakes that made it into the book and the lack of an errata sheet easily findable online. Also note that some facts, especially things like lists of prime ministers, only go up through 2001, so you may need a more conventional almanac (online or off) as well. These problems make this book too weak for study (e.g. for quiz bowl). However, it is great for casual browsing, writer brainstorming, etc., where you can then confirm details elsewhere if they become important.Highly recommended, with reservations noted above.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book will tell you anything you need for mind boggling questions or even writing reports