The Origin of Disease: The War Within

The Origin of Disease: The War Within

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Overview

US REVIEW OF BOOKS, Michael Radon theusreview.com/reviews/The-Origin-of-Disease-by-Carolyn-Merchant-JD-and-Christopher-Merchant-MD.html#.XLBmAehKi5o Containing exciting information and thought, this book could help people find ways to improve or avoid diseases that can dramatically alter lives. This book challenges a lot of accepted thinking in Western medicine, but all truly impactful ideas have to shatter the old to move [thought] forward. [T]he authors identify a pattern of the root causes of chronic illnesses and what can be done to fight maladies that many medical professionals say just happen and have to be lived with. For many people, medical books can be a hard hurdle to jump, but this book is written in an accessible style and format, and contains information useful to the layperson, not just medical professionals. PACIFIC BOOK REVIEW. Anthony Avina pacificbookreview.com/the-origin-of-disease-the-war-within This book does a great job of creating a conversation. It is a detailed, knowledgeable and thorough book filled with fascinating theories that all readers should have the opportunity to explore themselves. This is definitely an interesting book that will fascinate patients suffering from illnesses as well as doctors seeking new answers or medical researchers alike. It is a new perspective that is interesting to see, as the authors relay the causes of various chronic illnesses. The authors command over the medical expertise is both technical and yet relayed easily enough for patients and doctors alike to understand. If you enjoy medical books, suffer from an ailment or are curious about health overall, then you’ll want to grab your copy of The Origin of Disease: The War Within, Today! www.facebook.com/carolyn.merchant/39 www.theoriginofdiseases.com

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781546259794
Publisher: AuthorHouse
Publication date: 10/12/2018
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 614
Sales rank: 453,123
File size: 7 MB

About the Author

Christopher Merchant has been a family practice physician, for forty-two years. Carolyn Merchant has been an attorney for thirty-five years. They thought, discussed, observed, and researched their ideas on the origin of disease, for four decades. They offer experiences, observational science, research, and conclusions about the causes of chronic disease, which support a principle of the whole in chronic diseases. They challenge the medical system to think differently and to do better. The Merchants’ take a risk by writing this book. Understanding who they are makes clear they had no choice but to speak, to help others. Their personal history and evolution of thinking explains why it is their destiny to speak now! If you want more answers from your doctor, new creative ways to diagnose and treat chronic disease, for yourself or a loved one, and if you want healthy aging, the book is a must read!

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

THE REBEL WITHIN

Christopher Merchant, MD

Dr. Merchant was born to a long line of social revolutionaries. Critical thinking and voicing opinions, even unpopular opinions, were core values in the lives of his ancestors. His ancestors were intelligent, and spoke out for what was right, at risk to their careers and even at risk to their lives. Dr. Merchant's experiences growing up made clear to him he too had an obligation to speak out for what was right, and fight for justice. His destiny was to be an outspoken rebel, to speak the truth, to speak on behalf of others, and to think beyond what was known. It was his destiny to be a revolutionary in medicine.

Family lore reports Dr. Merchant's distant collateral relatives included Pope Pius IV, Saint Charles Borromeo, seven cardinals, and five Renaissance painters and sculptors named Crespi, whose art is displayed in museums and churches in Europe. Saint Charles Borromeo worked helping the poor with stomach disorders, and became the Patron Saint of Stomach Disorders. At the end of Saint Charles Borromeo's life, contrary to the wishes of his family, he donated his wealth to those in need. At Dr. Merchant's first job, in the South Valley, he was an outspoken rebel on behalf of patients with stomach disorders, caused by drinking contaminated water, which changed the course of his career.

Vincenzo Crespi IV, was born in Ceriana, Italy, in 1808. At the age of fourteen, Vincenzo was tricked into joining a Capuchin monastery. At a gathering of the town for confession, with the travelling friar, the friar verbally condemned Vincenzo to hell for playing billiards, in front of the entire town. Vincenzo was distraught over the public condemnation and humiliation, and fearful of being condemned to hell. After several days of torment, the travelling friar convinced Vincenzo he had no hope of salvation and was destined to be condemned to hell, unless he joined the monastery. The friar likely targeted Vincenzo because he was an intelligent and advanced student, of the kind sought after by the Capuchin monasteries.

When Vincenzo Crespi, IV, joined the monastery, he was required to abandon all worldly possessions, and any contact with family was prohibited, for the rest of his life. The monks in the monastery were brutal to young initiates. Vincenzo was required to keep his head down, and never look up into the face of his superiors, for the first year. If initiates violated monastery rules, they were subject to severe discipline, and various forms of starvation and humiliation. Vincenzo once flogged himself for hours, in his solitary room, as he was directed to do by his superiors. He was taught it was a sin to talk to Protestants, all Protestants were evil, and even talking to a Protestant could lead to condemnation to hell. Vincenzo wanted to leave the monastery many times, but saw the consequences to others who expressed a desire to leave or tried to leave. He feared if he let it be known he wanted to leave, his life could become even more difficult. He feared if he fled and was captured, he would be imprisoned, in the basement of the Vatican. On one of his last travels as a monk, Vincenzo met a family of Protestants, and was surprised at how hospitable, gracious and giving they were.

Vincenzo Crespi, IV, lived in the monastery for twenty years, and became a Doctor of Divinity and master of many languages. Near the end of his time in the monastery, Vincenzo collaborated with the underground press, to write and publish articles critical of the Catholic Church. The articles were published and distributed at night, in secret; and exposed beliefs and practices of the church, which he thought were hypocritical. In 1843, Vincenzo planned his escape to Switzerland, on a night when one of his articles would be published and distributed. As he fled, he heard the senior monks discovering his writings in the underground press and expressing outrage. Vincenzo moved from Switzerland to England, and taught French and Italian at the Royal Court of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. In 1847, Vincenzo met and married Marie Guillon, a Protestant.

In 1853, Vincenzo collaborated with the Reverend Girolamo Volpe, to write Memoirs of an Ex-Capuchin. The Rev. Girolamo Volpe wrote to Vincenzo, stating he wished to document Vincenzo Crespi's remarkable life. Vincenzo humbly agreed, hoping the book would spread the light of the gospel, by exposing the prejudices of the Catholic Church and the pretentiousness of holiness. The book demonstrates Vincenzo's extensive and highly educated vocabulary, and uses many words no longer in common usage. At the end of Memoirs of an Ex-Capuchin, Vincenzo said:

We have written dispassionately, incited alone by the love of truth, and urged by a strong desire, which struggled imperiously, to make known to men truths which we felt they ought to know. Feeling this strong necessity to communicate these facts to the world, woe to us [who] had the fear of human wrath, by whom so ever, or in what manner so ever, manifested, induced us to remain silent. Id @ 403.

Vincenzo and his wife Marie had eight children, four of whom lived to adulthood. In 1854, three of his children died in the cholera epidemic, in London. Vincenzo, his wife, and their oldest child, moved to Cheltenham, where Vincenzo taught French and Italian, at the University of Cheltenham. Another son Edward was born, and died of scarlet fever, in infancy. Vincenzo and Marie had three more children, in 1855, 1856, and 1862. In 1869, the family moved to Richmond, Virginia, where Vincenzo worked as a Professor of Languages at Richmond schools. Vincenzo's youngest child, Albert Vincent Guillon Crespi, was the father of Chris Merchant's grandmother, Clelia Delia Crespi. Vincenzo deeply loved his wife and family, and his final wish for his children was:

[They] not be hampered by the credulity which made him a victim of the Capuchins, and be privileged to labour in the cause of truth.

Memoirs of an Ex-Capuchin Monk has been restored and preserved, as part of a project aimed at historic preservation of old and important rare books; and is now available on Amazon. Vincenzo's picture, while living in Richmond, Virginia, shows he wore the same glasses Dr. Merchant has worn, for more than twenty years.

In writing Memoirs of an Ex-Capuchin, Vincenzo Crespi, IV, wanted to expose prejudice and hypocrisy in the Catholic Church, and felt an obligation to speak the truth. We feel compelled to write THE ORIGIN OF DISEASE: The War Within, to speak the truth about chronic disease, and expose the biases and false assumptions, inherent in the medical system, which stand in the way of diagnosis and treatment of chronic disease and important new discoveries. The medical system needs new ways of thinking, and a new vision, to conquer chronic disease. We cannot let fear keep us silent, and must report truths which others deserve to know. It is our obligation to write the book — it is your choice whether to act on the knowledge.

Dr. Merchant's collateral ancestors, through his grandfather, Crede Haskins Calhoun, include John C. Calhoun, a controversial political figure early in United States history. John C. Calhoun served as a United States Congressman, a United States Senator, Secretary of State, Secretary of War, and Vice-President of the United States. He was Crede Calhoun's great, great, great, grandfather. Crede H. Calhoun publicly denied his relationship to John C. Calhoun, because he did not approve of the fact John C. Calhoun owned slaves. Crede H. Calhoun was raised by his grandparents, who were part of the Underground Railroad, and helped slaves escape to Canada.

Crede H. Calhoun was Dr. Merchant's grandfather, the father of Dr. Merchant's mother, Clelia Calhoun. Crede Calhoun left home in Indiana, at age nineteen, to seek adventure and opportunity as a reporter, in Panama. He worked for two years as a postal clerk, in Miraflores, before returning to the United States to get a graduate degree in journalism. He returned to Panama, in 1911, and worked as a reporter for the Panama Star & Herald. He wrote many short stories, and articles reporting on the building of the Panama Canal. He worked with Colonel Gorgas to eradicate malaria and yellow fever, in Panama, to stop the deaths of thousands of workers who were building the Panama Canal. Crede Calhoun also contracted malaria, and the quinine treatment for malaria permanently impaired his hearing.

Crede H. Calhoun was appointed the first Director of Posts and the first Chief of Civil Affairs, and served as the Chief of the Division for Civil Affairs and Director of Posts for the Panama Canal Zone, from 1916-1947. He oversaw all functions not related to the actual operation of the Panama Canal, including the Postal service, Customs, Police, Fire, Immigration, Licensing and Registration, Civil Defense, Canal Zone schools, and libraries. Crede, his wife Clelia Delia Crespi Calhoun, and their infant daughter Peggy, were passengers on the first ship to traverse the Panama Canal.

While serving as Chief of Civil Affairs and Director of Posts, Crede Calhoun greeted Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis flight to Panama, on February 6, 1929; which was the first air mail delivery from the United States to Panama. Thereafter, Crede Calhoun and Charles Lindbergh became friends.

Crede Calhoun continued to work as a reporter, writing articles for the New York Herald Tribune, the New York Times, and Newsweek. He interviewed many dignitaries and public figures, including King Edward of England, when he was Duke of Winsor; Charles Lindbergh, when he made the first flight to Panama; author George Bernard Shaw; and Albert Einstein. He had "stringers" throughout Latin America, who provided him news stories. After retiring as Chief of Civil Affairs, he became the New York Times Latin American Bureau Chief. In 1953, he was awarded the Maria Moors Cabot Prize, awarded annually by Columbia University for journalistic excellence, for his work in Latin America. He was awarded the Order of Vasco Nunez de Balboa, the highest honor then awarded by the Republic of Panama, similar to a Medal of Honor in the United States. Many of his writings are preserved at the University of Wyoming, School of Journalism.

Crede Calhoun was fluent in five languages. During World War II, he served as a spy for the United States. He concealed his fluency in German, to enable him to listen to German conversations, and obtain valuable information directly and through his "stringers". He overheard Germans discuss war plans; learned of impending enemy attacks against ships in the Caribbean; and was instrumental in capturing an important German spy. He wrote an article for the New York Times, about an impending attack, which outraged President Franklin Roosevelt. President Roosevelt pressured the New York Times not to publish the article, which was not published until after President Roosevelt died.

Crede H. Calhoun and his wife Clelia Delia Crespi Calhoun had five children. The third child was Clelia Calhoun Merchant, who was Dr. Merchant's mother. Clelia Delia Calhoun was exceptionally intelligent, and devoted her life to her husband and five children. Crede and Clelia Calhoun raised their children to have and demonstrate democratic values, and concern for others. Crede Calhoun died, in 1972, at the age of ninety-three.

Brittmarie Janson Perez, known as Brittie, was born in Sweden and raised in Panama. Brittie is the oldest of ten children, and her mother Peggy was the oldest child of Crede H. Calhoun and Clelia Delia Crespi Calhoun. Brittie was Clelia Calhoun Merchant's niece, and Chris Merchant's cousin. Peggy, Clelia, and Brittie had very similar persona. All were intelligent, outspoken, and engaged in advocacy for just causes. Brittie became an outspoken critic of the military dictatorships of generals Omar Torrijos and Manuel Noriega, who seized power in Panama, in 1968. She risked her freedom and her life to help write, publish, and circulate a clandestine weekly newspaper, El Grito, created and distributed entirely by women, to expose the abuse of power and corruption, in Torrijos' and Noriega's military dictatorships. The El Grito was printed in the middle of the night, on a noisy mimeograph machine, in a secret room built by the editor, to avoid detection by the military gorillas. Brittie and her family had to flee Panama to avoid persecution. After fleeing, Brittie was tried in abstentia, and declared "provisionally" not guilty, in abstentia. She was later pardoned by the next administration.

Brittie and her family fled to Albuquerque, where Dr. Merchant and his wife Carolyn lived, and the population has deep Spanish roots. Brittie continued to research and write articles on authoritarianism and corruption, which she has demonstrated go hand-in-hand. At the University of New Mexico, Brittie earned a Master's Degree in Anthropology. She studied the adaptation and protests against repressive regimes, and for her Master's thesis, interviewed Cuban people impacted by the dictatorship of Fidel Castro. She later earned a Ph.D., in anthropology, at the University of Texas. Her Ph.D. thesis, "The Process of Political Protest in Panama: 1968-1989", traced twenty years of protests against corruption and repression, by the military dictatorships of Omar Torrijos and Manuel Noriega. She is also the author of "En nuestras propia voces: 1968-1989 (Spanish language version) and "Golpes y tratados: piezas para el rompecabezas de nuestra historia". Brittie's collection of research and writings, consisting of thirty-five linear feet of documents, clippings, audio recordings, and artifacts, are preserved as part of the Benson Latin American Collection of rare books and manuscripts, at the University of Texas. Brittie was the keynote speaker at a seminar on Latin America, at the University of Reno; and her dissertation has frequently been cited, in books about the military dictatorships, in Panama. She continues today researching and writing about government corruption.

Brittie fled Panama to avoid persecution for writing and distributing articles that exposed the abuse of power and corruption, by the military dictatorships, in Panama — just as Vincenzo Crespi, IV, fled the monastery, in 1843, to avoid persecution by the Catholic Church, for writing and distributing articles critical of the Catholic Church. Brittie followed the Calhoun family tradition of being an outspoken rebel, even at risk to her own freedom and her own life. Brittie is very proud of Chris and Carolyn, who she believes are fearless; and have bravely carried out the family tradition of speaking out for what is right and what will help others, even when the topic is unpopular or controversial. Once an outspoken rebel, always an outspoken rebel! Brittie, Chris and Carolyn carry on the family tradition of speaking the truth to help others.

Colonel Charles Albert Phelps Hatfield was Dr. Merchant's great grandfather on his father's side. Colonel Hatfield was born in Alabama, in 1850, and was a West Point graduate, class of 1872. His uncle and mentor was General Charles Edward Phelps, a Brigadier General during the Civil War, who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for heroism at the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse. General Phelps graduated from Princeton and Harvard Law School; and after his military service, became a lawyer, judge and congressman from Vermont. Colonel Hatfield corresponded with General Phelps frequently, during his military career.

Colonel Hatfield served in the 4, 8 and 13 Calvary. He led his cavalry unit throughout the southwestern United States, in Texas, Arizona and New Mexico, in the late 1880's and early 1900's. He served in the Indian Wars and the Geronimo Campaign; and received a Silver Star, for his bravery during the 1886 attack on Geronimo, in the Santa Cruz Mountains. On April 9, 1891, he and twelve of the men in his command received medals for meritorious acts or conduct in service to the country. Colonel Hatfield later became a controversial figure for actions he had taken during the Geronimo Campaign.

"Harper's Weekly" magazine sent Frederic Remington to the Southwest, to document the Geronimo campaign. In 1888, Remington joined Colonel Hatfield's cavalry unit, and they became friends. Colonel Hatfield was the commander of the cavalry unit, and a renowned horseman. Both men were from military families, both were excellent horseman, and both were talented artists. Colonel Hatfield kept a diary and sketch book during his time in New Mexico and Arizona, and drew elaborate pen and ink sketches of his encampments and his surroundings. Colonel Hatfield and Frederic Remington likely sketched together in their tent, during down time at encampments.

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "The Origin of Disease"
by .
Copyright © 2018 Carolyn Merchant, JD & Christopher Merchant, MD..
Excerpted by permission of AuthorHouse.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

DEDICATION, v,
PROLOGUE, xi,
CHAPTER 1: THE REBEL WITHIN, 1,
CHAPTER 2: THE EVOLUTION OF KNOWLEDGE FUELED REBELLION, 47,
CHAPTER 3: OBSERVATIONAL SCIENCE FUELED REBELLION, 67,
CHAPTER 4: THE PRINCIPLE OF THE WHOLE — THE ORIGIN OF DISEASE: The War Within, 81,
CHAPTER 5: INTRACELLULAR CHLAMYDIA PATHOGENS, 102,
CHAPTER 6: THE INFECTIOUS CASCADE OF PARASITIC DISEASE, 139,
CHAPTER 7: THE INFECTIOUS CASCADE OF CO-INFECTIONS, 168,
CHAPTER 8: THE INFECTIOUS CASCADE OF ABNORMAL PROTEINS, INFLAMMATION, ALTERED GENES, AND FUNGUS, 187,
CHAPTER 9: CHRONIC INFECTION IN GASTROINTESTINAL DISEASES, 202,
CHAPTER 10: CHRONIC INFECTION IN CARDIOVASCULAR AND LUNG DISEASES, 218,
CHAPTER 11: CHRONIC INFECTION IN NEUROLOGIC DISEASES, 246,
CHAPTER 12: CHRONIC INFECTION IN CANCER, 263,
CHAPTER 13: CHRONIC INFECTION IN AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES, 297,
CHAPTER 14: CHRONIC INFECTION IN ENDOCRINE DISEASES, 318,
CHAPTER 15: CHRONIC INFECTION IN REPRODUCTIVE DISEASES, 328,
CHAPTER 16: CHRONIC INFECTION IN EYE DISEASES, 343,
CHAPTER 17: CHRONIC INFECTION IN SKIN DISEASES, 396,
CHAPTER 18: CHRONIC INFECTION IN MENTAL ILLNESS, 406,
CHAPTER 19: CHRONIC INFECTION AND AGING, 424,
CHAPTER 20: SYMPTOMS & SYNDROMES INTERFERE WITH DIAGNOSIS, 431,
CHAPTER 21: MEDICAL SPECIALIZATION AND CHRONIC DISEASE, 442,
CHAPTER 22: MEDICINE IS CONTROLLED BY MONEY, FEAR & LACK OF TIME, 464,
CHAPTER 23: DIAGNOSIS OF CHLAMYDIA AND PARASITES, 492,
CHAPTER 24: TREATMENT AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE, 512,
CHAPTER 25: WE CAN FIGHT BACK AGAINST CHRONIC DISEASE, 532,
CHAPTER 26: RESEARCH CAN DISCOVER CAUSES AND CURES FOR CHRONIC DISEASE, 546,
CHAPTER 27: CONCLUSION, 568,
EPILOGUE, 573,
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF CITATIONS, 575,
BOOKS, 575,
ARTICLES, 579,
OTHER, 596,
LEGAL CASES, 601,

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