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The Outlaws of Mars
     

The Outlaws of Mars

4.5 2
by Otis Adelbert Kline, Joe R. Lansdale, Erik Mona (Editor), Pierce Watters (Editor), James Sutter (Editor)
 

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  • Otis Adelbert Kline’s final triumphant sword-and-planet epic soars back into print for the first time in almost 50 years!
  • Jerry Morgan accepts his scientist uncle’s offer to transport him to
    Mars for a series of thrilling adventures and exploits featuring terrible monsters, fantastic societies, and gorgeous princesses in the Edgar

Overview

  • Otis Adelbert Kline’s final triumphant sword-and-planet epic soars back into print for the first time in almost 50 years!
  • Jerry Morgan accepts his scientist uncle’s offer to transport him to
    Mars for a series of thrilling adventures and exploits featuring terrible monsters, fantastic societies, and gorgeous princesses in the Edgar Rice
    Burroughs tradition.
  • At last presented in the original, unabridged format last seen in
    1934’s Argosy Weekly, the new Planet Stories edition of this science fiction classic restores Kline to his place of honor in the sword-and-planet field.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781601251510
Publisher:
Paizo Inc.
Publication date:
05/06/2009
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

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The Outlaws of Mars 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
EntertainingCM More than 1 year ago
recommended for the adventurer in unusual unknown imaginary planets, great fantasy work, Kline wrote 5 interconnected novels, this is second of the Mars duo and there are 3 in the Venus group. Action and daring-do for all adventurers.
Bill_Newman More than 1 year ago
Although written 30 years before "Swordsman of Mars", in chronology this books follows "Swordsman" (which really should be read first). There is no exact continuity of characters, but enough. Jerry Morgan, forced to resign his command due to betrayal by his best friend and his finance, goes to his uncle Dr Richard Morgan in an attempt to pick up the pieces of his life. Dr Morgan is a shadowy figure to Jerry living in a mountainous retreat that Jerry had never before been allowed to visit. Jerry is very surprised to discover that his uncle, in conjunction with Val Lak, a Martian scientist and psychologist, has developed a machine to exchange thoughts with others...even millions of years in the past and on other planets. In "Swordsman of Mars" personalities were exchanged from a person on Earth with one on Mars. Now however Dr Morgan has developed a craft capable of exceeding the bonds of time and space and proposes to send his nephew Jerry to the ancient planet of Mars to be Dr Morgan's second representative on that planet. By physically sending Jerry there in his own body, Jerry's body retains it's inherent strength and agility (much like John Carter of Mars). Landing on the planet he immediately gets himself in trouble by slaying the princesses' pet and is sentenced to death! Lal Vak arrives in time to save Jerry and the adventures continue. The country Jerry has arrived in is wound up in a political intrigue involving the people of several races and Jerry's amazing entry has placed him in the very center of it. Sentenced first to death, then to life-time imprisonment in the mines, Jerry is involved in fights, sword fights, escapes, rescues and even more intrigues involving beautiful, but powerful, women. The science is campy and requires a suspension of disbelief, but the story telling is excellent and compelling. Kline is not Edgar Rice Burroughs or Robert E Howard, but he is very good and well worth the time to read.