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The Pacesetter: The Untold Story of Carl G. Fisher
     

The Pacesetter: The Untold Story of Carl G. Fisher

by Jerry M. Fisher
 
Carl G. Fisher did not live the American dream - he made the American dream. The dirt poor Indiana Boy built his dreams into vast fortunes, nothing was impossible to Carl G. Fisher. He had the vision to see, the daring to plan, and the courage to build.

Overlooked and forgotten by the editors of Who's Who, Carl G. Fisher is at long last being recognized.

Overview

Carl G. Fisher did not live the American dream - he made the American dream. The dirt poor Indiana Boy built his dreams into vast fortunes, nothing was impossible to Carl G. Fisher. He had the vision to see, the daring to plan, and the courage to build.

Overlooked and forgotten by the editors of Who's Who, Carl G. Fisher is at long last being recognized. A "Practical Visionary," he created the first Transcontinental Highway, built the 500, developed Miami Beach, and Montauk, New York, known as "Miami Beach of the North."

Now Jerry M. Fisher, a cousin of Carl's, has written the definitive biography of the man who built what he dared to envision. Carl G. Fisher carved the playground of Miami Beach from the swamps of a mosquito infested jungle. He was "Mr. Miami Beach." He sculpted Montauk, New York, and made Long Island a fashionable place to live. The Indianapolis 500 remains the worlds premier racing event. The Lincoln (Transcontinental) and Dixie highways, awesome accomplishments for their time or any, brought the country into the 20th century the way the railroad brought the country together in the 19th century.

Presidents called him a friend; the Gasoline Alley Gang of Ford, Chevrolet, and Firestone regarded him as a pacesetter. Al Capone considered him a nuisance. When Carl G. Fisher drove the pace car for the first Indy 500 in 1911 he was not only setting the pace car for that race, but for all Americans who venture onto highways on vacation.

Editorial Reviews

Indianapolis Star
. . a fascinating book about a fascinating but forgotten man. Fisher doesn't whitewash his relative's faults or embellish his assets. This is a cards-on-the-table biography. The Pacesetter is heavily notated and draws on hundreds of sources to light the shadows of a marketing genius who shunned the spotlight. [It] takes Fisher through his quarrels with Miami Beach resident Al Capone, the liquor Fisher hid during Prohibition, the developer's fights with Florida's anti-Semitism and racism, and the death of his only child, 26 days after the boy was born.
Packards International
This book is riveting, especially for a fan of biographies of people who achieve great things. If you like reading about achievers, and want to know more about the great builders of the 20th Century, you'll love this book about Carl Fisher.
Library Journal - Library Journal
Carl G. Fisher was an early 20th-century entrepreneur whose energy and gift for promotion carried him through a number of very successful and historically noteworthy ventures: He created the famed Indianapolis Motor Speedway and its annual 500-mile race, and he was the motivating and organizing force behind the Lincoln Highway, the nation's first transcontinental road. Fisher seems best known as the primary developer of Miami Beach, then little more than a tropical swamp. He similarly began to develop Montauk, Long Island, before going bankrupt during the Great Depression. This portrait was written by a Fisher relative to offset a general lack of biographical information about him. (Fisher's first wife, Jane, wrote an earlier biography, Fabulous Hoosier.) Extensively researched, it gives significant detail about Fisher's projects, yet at times it reads too much like a mere gathering of facts. Nonetheless, Fisher's achievements deserve to be documented. Libraries in Indiana and South Florida ought to have this title, as should those with collections about American entrepreneurs.--David B. Van De Streek, Pennsylvania State Univ. Libs., York

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781882897216
Publisher:
Lost Coast Press
Publication date:
04/28/1998
Edition description:
1st Edition
Pages:
440
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.50(d)

What People are Saying About This

Howard Kleinberg
It The Pacesetter will be Carl Fisher's coming out party. Since his death in 1939 at the age of 65, his life and accomplishments have been slipping into obscurity. Fisher was one of America's great entrepreneurs, but too few today are aware that he also was a daredevil who raced bicycles and autos; that he established the Indianapolis 500 auto race; perfected automobile headlamps; was most responsible for the building of the Lincoln Highway, the country's first transcontinental highway; and was the prime developer of Miami Beach. . . . Fisher's imagination and creativity were great. However, earlier essayists and reporters did not give him enough credit for being the promoter that he was.
Donald Davidson
. . . had it not been for Carl G. Fisher . . . it is highly unlikely there would have ever been any such thing as the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Some of us have been fascinated by this extremely complex and rather mysterious person over the years and have wanted to learn much more. Now, through the efforts of his cousin Jerry Fisher, we finally can.

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