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Power of Acknowledgment
     

Power of Acknowledgment

by Judith W. Umlas
 
The Age of Enlightenment changed the way mankind thought about life, culture and human relationships. In her evocative new book, The Power of Acknowledgment, Judith W. Umlas unleashes the concept of an Age of Acknowledgment we can all help bring about.

In a time of celebrity worship and self-absorption, Judith's well-reasoned and heart-felt appeal is so

Overview

The Age of Enlightenment changed the way mankind thought about life, culture and human relationships. In her evocative new book, The Power of Acknowledgment, Judith W. Umlas unleashes the concept of an Age of Acknowledgment we can all help bring about.

In a time of celebrity worship and self-absorption, Judith's well-reasoned and heart-felt appeal is so counterculture as to be revolutionary. Imagine, as does the author, people acknowledging each other's humanity, accomplishments, talents and wisdom on a continuous basis. It might just catch on. And wouldn't that be something!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780979215360
Publisher:
IIL Publishing NY
Publication date:
03/28/2008
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.50(d)

Read an Excerpt

1. The world is full of people who deserve to be acknowledged. It will be easier to acknowledge those you care most about if you start by practicing your acknowledgment skills on people you don�t know very well, or even know at all. Then you will begin making the world a happier place.

2. Acknowledgement builds intimacy and creates powerful interactions. Acknowledge the people around you directly and fully, especially those with whom you are in an intimate relationship. What is it about your spouse, your daughter, your uncle, your oldest colleague or subordinate that you want to acknowledge? Look for ways to say how much you value them, and then be prepared for miracles!

3. Acknowledgment neutralizes, defuses, deactivates and reduces the effect of jealousy and envy! Acknowledge those you are jealous of, for the very attributes you envy. Watch the envy diminish and the relationship grow stronger as you grow to accept valuable input from the person you were envying.

4. Recognizing good work leads to high energy, great feelings, high-quality performance and terrific results. Not acknowledging good work causes lethargy, resentment, sorrow and withdrawal. Recognize and acknowledge good work, wherever you find it. It�s not true that people only work hard if they worry whether you value them. Quite the opposite!

5. Truthful, heartfelt and deserved acknowledgment always makes a difference, sometimes a profound one, in a person�s life and work. Rarely given acknowledgements have no more value than frequent ones. Sincere praise should not be withheld due to fear of diminishing returns, of appearing inappropriate or out of embarrassment. These obstacles can and should be overcome in order for you and your recipients to reap the tremendous rewards.

6. It is likely that acknowledgment can improve the emotional and physical health of both the giver and the receiver. There is already substantial scientific evidence that gratitude and forgiveness help well-being, alertness and energy, diminish stress and feelings of negativity, actually boosting the immune system. It is reported that they can even reduce the risk of stroke and heart failure. This research leads us to believe that acknowledging others has similar effects.

7. Practice different ways of getting through to the people you want to acknowledge. Develop an acknowledgment repertoire that will give you the tools to reach out to the people in your life in the different ways that will be the most meaningful to each situation and each person.

What People are Saying About This

Marci Shimoff
"The Power of Acknowledgement" offers a simple yet important message to help readers spread positive feedback that will enhance their lives and the lives of the people around them."--(Marci Shimoff, co-author, Chicken Soup for the Woman's Soul Featured teacher in hit film, The Secret)
Waldy Malouf
"What a great book that states the obvious which is often times forgotten. A simple explanation of what should be a simple concept but in reality is more complicated and fleeting than most people realize. I acknowledge Judith for creating a book that has helped me and will help anyone and everyone."--(Waldy Malouf, Chef/CO-Owner, Beacon Restaurant & Bar, NYC)
Shakir Zuberi
I experienced first hand 'the power of acknowledgment,' he stated. "People were mad, frustrated and started a shouting match at the United Airlines service desk. When my turn came, I acknowledged the agent's hard work, sense of service and her efforts to get us out of a bad situation. I immediately saw a look of surprise on her face, an easing of tensions and a smile not only in my agent but also in others working next to her. Acknowledgement appears to be a fundamental human element in our relationships with one another. Thank you for introducing me to this powerful concept. (Shakir Zuberi, President of Project-Management International )
Yue-Sai Kan
"Having known and worked with Judy Umlas for over 20 years, I must admit that a lot of what I am today is because of her. I love her book. Read it! It may help to have her next to you like she has been next to me for so long."--(Yue-Sai Kan, cosmetics icon and television celebrity)
Harold Kerzner
"Motivating teams has always been a challenge. Judith W. Umlas' book will provide you with authentic and powerful techniques for maximizing the potential of your team."--(Harold Kerzner, Ph.D.)

Meet the Author

Judith W. Umlas is Sr. Vice President of Learning Innovations at International Institute for Learning, Inc. (IIL). She is also Director/Secretary of Small Companies United for Global Disaster Relief, Inc., a not-for-profit organization, and Co-Publisher of the global Web portal allPM.com. She has worked in television production, marketing and corporate business development at CBS, PBS cable television and IIL. Her writing credits include Working Woman magazine, The New York Times, Chicago Tribune.

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