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The Presidency and Domestic Policy: Comparing Leadership Styles, FDR to Clinton
     

The Presidency and Domestic Policy: Comparing Leadership Styles, FDR to Clinton

by William W. Lammers, Michael A. Genovese (Joint Author)
 
Investigating how much individual presidents have shaped domestic policy, political science professors, Lammers (U. of Southern California) and Genovese (Loyola Marymount U.) examine the first terms of every president from FDR to Clinton, evaluating leadership styles, policy agendas, and the presidents' respective opportunities to institute policy change. Each

Overview

Investigating how much individual presidents have shaped domestic policy, political science professors, Lammers (U. of Southern California) and Genovese (Loyola Marymount U.) examine the first terms of every president from FDR to Clinton, evaluating leadership styles, policy agendas, and the presidents' respective opportunities to institute policy change. Each president's success in bringing about important legislation and policy changes is assessed. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
The subtitle of this book defines the authors' goal, for they adroitly analyze the personal leadership styles of the presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to Bill Clinton as well as the opportunities that made or marred their chances to affect the domestic policy agenda. They look at these men from four dimensions: "Approaches to advisory processes and decision making, administrative strategies, public leadership, and congressional leadership." They contend that different opportunity levels have widely affected presidents. For that reason they label opportunity levels as high, moderate, and low and show how these, coupled with skill, leadership styles, strategic choices, personalities and prior career experiences, influenced the success or failures of these presidential leaders. Careful analysis covers each president as the authors reflect on helpful influences and some limitations encountered by each man from 1933-1997. By the authors' definition, the high opportunity presidents were Roosevelt, Johnson, and Reagan. Moderate opportunity presidents were Truman, Eisenhower, and Kennedy. Low opportunity presidents were Nixon, Carter, Bush, and Clinton. (Ford is not included since he only completed Nixon's term of office.) After a discussion of each presidential term, which includes abundant historical material on all aspects of domestic policy and the considerable variations in the presidents' leadership styles, strategies, and skills, the authors look at the role of the president as the U.S. moves into the 21st century. Students of history and government will find this a compact, serious, but reader-friendly history of the domestic presidency from 1933 to 1997, which provides muchmaterial for discussion and debate. KLIATT Codes: SA—Recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2000, CQ Press, 383p, 24cm, 99-088686, $28.95. Ages 16 to adult. Reviewer: Mary T. Gerrity; Libn., Queen Anne Sch., Upper Marlboro, MD, September 2000 (Vol. 34 No. 5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781568021256
Publisher:
Congressional Quarterly, Inc.
Publication date:
02/28/2000
Pages:
383
Product dimensions:
6.18(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.91(d)

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