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The Prince
     

The Prince

5.0 1
by Niccolo Machiavelli, Angelo Codevilla
 

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ISBN-10: 0300064039

ISBN-13: 9780300064032

Pub. Date: 07/28/1997

Publisher: Yale University Press

Need to seize a country? Have enemies you must destroy? In this handbook for despots and tyrants, the Renaissance statesman Machiavelli sets forth how to accomplish this and more, while avoiding the awkwardness of becoming generally hated and despised.

"Men ought either to be well treated or crushed, because they can avenge themselves of lighter injuries, of

Overview

Need to seize a country? Have enemies you must destroy? In this handbook for despots and tyrants, the Renaissance statesman Machiavelli sets forth how to accomplish this and more, while avoiding the awkwardness of becoming generally hated and despised.

"Men ought either to be well treated or crushed, because they can avenge themselves of lighter injuries, of more serious ones they cannot; therefore the injury that is to be done to a man ought to be of such a kind that one does not stand in fear of revenge."

For nearly 500 years, Machiavelli's observations on Realpolitik have shocked and appalled the timid and romantic, and for many his name was equivalent to the devil's own. Yet, The Prince was the first attempt to write of the world of politics as it is, rather than sanctimoniously of how it should be, and thus The Prince remains as honest and relevant today as when Machiavelli first put quill to parchment, and warned the junior statesman to know how to do wrong, and to make use of it or not according to necessity.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780300064032
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Publication date:
07/28/1997
Series:
Rethinking the Western Tradition Series
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
235,838
Product dimensions:
8.18(w) x 5.36(h) x 0.56(d)

Table of Contents

Map
Introduction
Translator's Note
Selected Books
Machiavelli's Principal Works
Letter to the Magnificent Lorenzo de Medici ..... 1
I: How many kinds of principality there are and the ways in which they are acquired ..... 5
II: Hereditary principalities ..... 5
III: Composite principalities ..... 6
IV :Why the kingdom of Darius conquered by Alexander did not rebel against his successors after his death ..... 13
V: How cities or principalities which lived under their own laws should be administered after being conquered ..... 16
VI: New principalities acquired by one's own arms and prowess ..... 17
VII: New principalities acquired with the help of fortune and foreign arms ..... 20
VIII: Those who come to power by crime ..... 27
IX: The constitutional principality ..... 31
X: How the strength of every principality should be measured ..... 34
XI: Ecclesiastical principalities ..... 36
XII: Military organization and mercenary troops ..... 39
XIII: Auxiliary, composite, and native troops ..... 43
XIV: How a prince should organize his militia ..... 47
XV: The things for which men, and especially princes, are praised or blamed ..... 49
XVI: Generosity and parsimony ..... 51
XVII: Cruelty and compassion; and whether it is better to be loved than feared, or the reverse ..... 53
XVIII: How princes should honour their word ..... 56
XIX: The need to avoid contempt and hatred ..... 58
XX: Whether fortresses and many of the other present-day expedients to which princes have recourse are useful or not ..... 67
XXI: How a prince must act to win honour ..... 71
XXII: A prince's personal staff ..... 75
XXIII: How flatterers must be shunned ..... 76
XXIV: Why the Italian princes have lost their states ..... 78
XXV: How far human affairs are governed by fortune, and how fortune can be opposed ..... 79
XXVI: Exhortation to liberate Italy from the barbarians ..... 82
Glossary of Proper Names ..... 86
Notes ..... 99

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The Prince (Hpc Classics Series) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
The end justifies the means. This simple, pragmatic maxim underpins Niccolò Machiavelli's classic work, The Prince. Written in 1513, when Machiavelli was a Florentine registry official, this handbook of political power provoked controversy like no other. Its central theme is how Renaissance rulers should act if they want to prevail. According to the author, a strong state requires a leader who is able to defend his power at all costs. Machiavelli maintains that a ruler may deceive, trick, oppress and even murder his opponents, as long as his misdeeds serve the state's stability. Without question, this short treatise offers enough material to demonize its author. However, Machiavelli does not champion unlimited ruthlessness and violence. Nor does he justify any objectives that seem to warrant violence. However, he also does not try to align his work to Christian morals as he examines the practice of statecraft and leadership. The term "Machiavellian" emerged in the 16th century to describe a devious, cruel tyrant, who uses any means to achieve his goals. When 20th century dictators praised Machiavelli's masterpiece, it came into disrepute, but in contemporary thought, its literary foresight makes it a classic. Modern readers will be able to understand the book's significance thanks to the accessible translation and annotations by Peter Bondanella. To put the treatise in context, Maurizio Viroli explains in his introduction, "For Machiavelli, the old way of building and preserving a regime.had to be abandoned in order to embrace a new conception.based on the principle that no state is a true dominion unless it is sustained by an army composed of citizens or subjects." getAbstract recommends The Prince to literature and history buffs, be they subjects or citizens, and to strategists and political scientists as a core work in their field.