The Pursuit of Justice

The Pursuit of Justice

Hardcover

$77.00

Overview

The Pursuit of Justice prints for the first time a collection of lectures and papers written and delivered by Lord Woolf since 1986, following his retirement in 2005 from the office of Lord Chief Justice and a judicial career that has spanned over four decades.

The papers cover developments that have occurred in a variety of legal areas, and which continue to be relevant in a changing world, including the rule of law and the constitution, the role of judges, access to justice, human rights, medicine, the environment, crime and penal reform, and legal education. Each paper discusses the challenges that have arisen in English common law in recent times and the way they have been solved or attempted to be solved to ensure that justice is done: so that arrests and searches are made properly; that there are fair hearings; readily available lawful remedies; and the removal of unnecessary costs and delays.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780199217090
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date: 05/26/2008
Pages: 424
Product dimensions: 6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

Lord Woolf is former Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales; currently Privy Councillor and non-permanent judge of the Court of Final Appeal of Hong Kong; Bencher of the Inner Temple; Member of Blackstone Chambers; Fellow, Council Chairman and Visiting Professor of Law, University College London.
Christopher Campbell-Holt currently works in banking law at the international law firm, Norton Rose. Chris is Consulting Editor and Director of Business Development of the legal philosophy journal, the UCL Jurisprudence Review, and has worked as a research assistant at the UCL Constitution Unit where he contributed to preparation for the implementation of the Freedom of Information Act for the Department of Constitutional Affairs; and at Landmark Chambers where he researched legal developments in the areas of property, planning and public law for Local Authorities & Human Rights, Drabble, Maurici, and Buley (OUP, 2004).

Table of Contents


Chronology     xi
Introduction     1
The English Legal System
A Question of Balance     19
Remedies     45
Droit Public-English Style     69
The Education the Justice System Requires Today     89
The Constitution and the Judiciary
Magna Carta: A Precedent for Recent Constitutional Change     101
The Rule of Law and a Change in the Constitution     117
Judicial Review-The Tensions Between the Executive and the Judiciary     131
Should the Media and the Judiciary be on Speaking Terms?     149
Judicial Independence Not Judicial Isolation     161
The Needs of a 21st Century Judge     175
Current Challenges in Judging     193
The Impact of Human Rights     209
Human Rights and Minorities     223
Crime and Penal Reform
The Strangeways Prison Report: Overview     239
Strangeways: A Decade of Change?     259
A Justice System the Community Owns     277
Do We Need a New Approach to Penal Policy?     281
Making Sense of Sentencing     293
Civil Justice
Access to Justice Final Report: Overview     311
Medics, Lawyers and the Courts-A Defence of the Access to Justice Recommendations     323
Are the Courts Excessively Deferential to the Medical Profession?     343
Are the Judiciary Environmental Myopic?     361
Environmental Law and Sustainable Development     381
International Legal Systems
The International Role of the Judiciary     395
The Rule of Law and the Development of a Modern Economy in China     405
The Rule of Law and Harmony in China     417
Index     427

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The Pursuit of Justice 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
THE EASY CHARM OF HARRY WOOLF, A LORD CHIEF JUSTICE OF ENGLAND AND WALES I liked this book because it has the easy charm and the depth of its subject, Harry Woolf, whose character comes out very clearly in the work, so well structured by Christopher Campbell-Holt. I liked Lord Woolf when I met him some years ago at a prize-giving at the University of London, and I can see much of his personal motivation and thought shining though in this excellent set of essays which all law students should read before their exams. The layout of the book places his lectures and writings in their context and gives a valuable glimpse into the world of top judges and the tremendous issues which confront them with their work. I do associate Lord Woolf with the Human Rights Act for which he will always be closely linked, and for his strong support for the need to be tough on the causes of crime itself. And I will forever thank him for the Civil Procedure Rules which will be his legacy I came away from reading the essays with the view that his pursuit of justice is based on the need for long term policies which are constructive with solutions to sentencing inflation and prison overcrowding, the responsibility for which has to be laid at the politicians' doorstep. Woolf has talked about a residual power concerning human rights 'which may not need to be an intrusion' when thinking about such issues, and it is his balance in the pursuit of justice in areas such as this which shines throughout the book. It is a great read for the budding jurisprudent and legal philosopher. Phillip Taylor, Richmond Green Chambers.
PhillipTaylor on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
"PREPARED FOR THE LAW¿BUT NOT THE POLITICS"-THE EASY CHARM OF HARRY WOOLF I liked this book because it has the easy charm and the depth of its subject, Harry Woolf, whose character comes out very clearly in the work, so well structured by Christopher Campbell-Holt. I liked Lord Woolf when I met him some years ago at a prize-giving at the University of London, and I can see much of his personal motivation and thought shining though in this excellent set of essays which all law students should read before their exams. The layout of the book places his lectures and writings in their context and gives a valuable glimpse into the world of top judges and the tremendous issues which confront them with their work. I do associate Lord Woolf with the Human Rights Act for which he will always be closely linked, and for his strong support for the need to be tough on the causes of crime itself. And I will forever thank him for the Civil Procedure Rules which will be his legacyI came away from reading the essays with the view that his pursuit of justice is based on the need for long term policies which are constructive with solutions to sentencing inflation and prison overcrowding, the responsibility for which has to be laid at the politicians' doorstep. Woolf has talked about a residual power concerning human rights 'which may not need to be an intrusion' when thinking about such issues, and it is his balance in the pursuit of justice in areas such as this which shines throughout the book. It is a great read for the budding jurisprudent and legal philosopher.