The Rabbit Ate My Homework

The Rabbit Ate My Homework

by Rachel Elizabeth Cole

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Overview

The Rabbit Ate My Homework by Rachel Elizabeth Cole

Eleven year-old Drew Montgomery has not, does not, and will not ever want a stupid old rabbit. All they do is sit in their cages, eat carrots, and poop. Then his annoying little sister blackmails him into hiding a bunny in his closet. She knows what really happened to his "stolen" bike and she's threatening to tell. Now Drew’s in a real jam. If his "No pets!" parents find the rabbit or, worse, his sister blabs the truth, he'll be grounded till grade seven for sure. And if that’s not enough trouble, two girls at school drag him into a prank war that goes from bad to worse--and it's all the rabbit’s fault. Plus, the weirdest girl in his class wants to be his science partner. If she tells him she wants to be his girlfriend, he just knows he’s gonna die. Drew must find a way to outwit the mean girls, wiggle out of the blackmail deal, and get rid of the rabbit before it destroys his bedroom and his life.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780991766727
Publisher: Tangled Oak Press
Publication date: 09/02/2014
Series: Rabbit Ate My . . . , #1
Pages: 214
Sales rank: 569,337
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.49(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

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The Rabbit Ate My Homework 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous 4 months ago
9999
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love it loooooooooooveittttttttttt
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Kathryn Bennett for Readers' Favorite The Rabbit Ate My Homework by Rachel Elizabeth Cole introduces 11-year-old Drew who does not want a rabbit; he thinks, in fact, that they are rather stupid. Drew has a sister who is just as annoying as rabbits. It is his sister who blackmails him. You see, she knows what actually happened to his bike. It is this knowledge she wields that convinces him to hide one of those annoying furry critters in his closet! The problem is his parents have said 'no pets' and he is sure if his parents find the animal he will be grounded until junior high. To make matters worse, Drew has to deal with some mean girls who start a prank war with him. Oh, what a fun romp of a story this is! Drew is like a lot of little boys that I know through family and friends. I truly did find this an endearing book and what really stood out for me is that there was no big learning lesson tackled. Yes, those kinds of books are important too, but this was just a good compelling read. It is short and sweet with phrasing and sentence assembly perfect for the intended age group. The book is neither too fast as to be overwhelming for a child or too slow as to cause boredom. A bit like how the phrase goes in Goldilocks: it is just right. I would not hesitate for a moment to read this one to or with a child and plan to bring it to my nephews for a read soon! A must-have for anyone with children in the family.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
O.O
Daisy44 More than 1 year ago
I liked this book, but did not like the main character. It is not the first time a main character and I did not mesh in the first book of a series. I may try to read on to see how he develops. Why didn't I like Drew? He is hot-headed and selfish. Don't try to throw the "he's an 11-year old" boy argument on the table. Not all 11-year old boys are like this. They may have moments; we all have moments. He did show promise as he realized he likes Tiny. I also did not like the parents. I may be overreacting, but for Drew to be that afrais of telling his dad how disappointed he is not to go bike riding in the first place and then after...yes, I have many instances when I have tried to fix my own mistakes...but even the way his mom talks to him about his father makes it sound as if he is abusive. Mom is a bit more sympathetic, but they are hiding something about stresses in the workplace from the kids and that is no good either. Plus her whole wetting the bed discussion is upsetting - at his age I might think of something closer to the realm of puberty, perhaps she doesn't want to go there because he is her baby boy - plus rabbit urine smells nothing like human urine. Wouldn't his room smell more like port-a-pot than barn? Libby is your typical little girl. Sweet,smart, and diabolically brilliant. She knows what she wants and sets on a course of how to get it...and is successful! Now for the star of the show...Tiny! It is obvious the author has experience with house rabbits. The behaviors and mannerisms are described perfectly and made me think of our first house rabbit who truly enjoyed nibbling power cords; another one who excelled at binkies (high kicks); all our bunnies and their wiggling noses and thumps. The only issue I have here is the illustrator draws Tiny with lop ears - Flemish Giants don't usually have lop ears.
GratefulGrandma More than 1 year ago
Drew and his little sister Libby are like most brothers and sisters, he thinks she is annoying and she wants to spend time with him. When Drew and his father are supposed to go for a bike ride, he gets upset because his father won't keep his word and go bike riding in the woods with him. Drew decides then to go by himself, even he knows he is not supposes to go into the woods alone. When he jumps with his bike, the bike's suspension fork breaks. Drew hides his bike in the woods while trying to come up with a solution. Libby, who followed him sees the whole thing, but does not tell him that she is. When the following day they find a little bunny in a box, Libby wants in bring it home. Drew explains that their parents would never, ever let them have a pet. Libby threatens Drew with telling their parents about what happened with his bike if he doesn't help her to hide the bunny. That's how Tiny ends hidden in Drew's closet, peeing everywhere, especially on his bed and eating everything he can find. The troubles continue to mount when their father realizes Drew's bike is missing and calls to report it to the police. How is Drew going to set things straight? This story was very engaging even for me as an adult. The main characters are likable and the secondary characters add humour and help to develop understanding of Drew's character. The pace of the story was good with short chapters. The solving of the situations in the story was done in a positive way with the message of being honest coming through. There were a few black and white illustrations in the book which added to the story. I am looking forward to reading the next book in this series, This book is geared to independent readers grade 3 to 6. A great read aloud for younger kids. I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.