The Ramona Collection, Volume 1: Beezus and Ramona, Ramona and Her Father, Ramona the Brave, Ramona the Pest

The Ramona Collection, Volume 1: Beezus and Ramona, Ramona and Her Father, Ramona the Brave, Ramona the Pest

Paperback(Slipcase Edition)

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Overview

Four beloved Ramona books in one fun box!

The appeal of Beverly Cleary’s stories about the wonderful, blunderful Ramona Quimby has never faded. Each new generation feels connected to Ramona’s unique way of looking at the world as she tries to adjust to new teachers, feels jealous about Susan's curls, and is secretly pleased by Yard Ape's teasing.

The scrapes she gets herself into—like wearing pajamas to school or accidentally making egg yolk shampoo—are funny and heartwarming, and sometimes embarrassing. No matter what, Ramona’s lively, curious spirit shines through. Now, with lively art by Jacqueline Rogers, here are four of Beverly Cleary’s favorite Ramona titles in one collection!

This collection includes 4 complete paperbacks:

  • Beezus and Ramona
  • Ramona the Pest
  • Ramona the Brave
  • Ramona and Her Father

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061246470
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 03/19/2013
Series: Ramona Series , #1
Edition description: Slipcase Edition
Pages: 848
Sales rank: 52,512
Product dimensions: 0.00(w) x 0.00(h) x (d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

Beverly Cleary is one of America's most beloved authors. As a child, she struggled with reading and writing. But by third grade, after spending much time in her public library in Portland, Oregon, she found her skills had greatly improved. Before long, her school librarian was saying that she should write children's books when she grew up.

Instead she became a librarian. When a young boy asked her, "Where are the books about kids like us?" she remembered her teacher's encouragement and was inspired to write the books she'd longed to read but couldn't find when she was younger. She based her funny stories on her own neighborhood experiences and the sort of children she knew. And so, the Klickitat Street gang was born!

Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the American Library Association's Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented to her in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature. Dear Mr. Henshaw won the Newbery Medal, and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. Her characters, including Beezus and Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ralph, the motorcycle-riding mouse, have delighted children for generations.


Jaqueline Rogers has been a professional children's book illustrator for more than twenty years and has worked on nearly one hundred children's books.

Hometown:

Carmel, California

Date of Birth:

April 12, 1916

Place of Birth:

McMinnville, Oregon

Education:

B.A., University of California-Berkeley, 1938; B.A. in librarianship, University of Washington (Seattle), 1939

Read an Excerpt

The Ramona Collection, Volume 1


By Beverly Cleary

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2006 Beverly Cleary
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0061246476

Beezus and Ramona

Chapter One
Beezus and Her Little Sister

Beatrice Quimby's biggest problem was her little sister Ramona. Beatrice, or Beezus (as everyone called her, because that was what Ramona had called her when she first learned to talk), knew other nine-year-old girls who had little sisters who went to nursery school, but she did not know anyone with a little sister like Ramona.

Beezus felt that the biggest trouble with four-year-old Ramona was that she was just plain exasperating. If Ramona drank lemonade through a straw, she blew into the straw as hard as she could to see what would happen. If she played with her finger paints in the front yard, she wiped her hands on the neighbors' cat. That was the exasperating sort of thing Ramona did. And then there was the way she behaved about her favorite book.

It all began one afternoon after school when Beezus was sitting in her father's big chair embroidering a laughing teakettle on a pot holder for one of her aunts for Christmas. She was trying to embroider this one neatly, because she planned to give it to Aunt Beatrice, who was Mother's younger sister and Beezus's most special aunt.

With gray thread Beezus carefully outlined the steam coming from the teakettle'sspout and thought about her pretty young aunt, who was always so gay and so understanding. No wonder she was Mother's favorite sister. Beezus hoped to be exactly like Aunt Beatrice when she grew up...

Ramona the Pest

Chapter One
Ramona's Great Day

"I am not a pest," Ramona Quimby told her big sister Beezus.

"Then stop acting like a pest," said Beezus, whose real name was Beatrice. She was standing by the front window waiting for her friend Mary Jane to walk to school with her.

"I'm not acting like a pest. I'm singing and skipping," said Ramona, who had only recently learned to skip with both feet. Ramona did not think she was a pest. No matter what others said, she never thought she was a pest. The people who called her a pest were always bigger and so they could be unfair.

Ramona went on with her singing and skipping. "This is a great day, a great day, a great day!" she sang, and to Ramona, who was feeling grown-up in a dress instead of play clothes, this was a great day, the greatest day of her whole life. No longer would she have to sit, on her tricycle watching Beezus and Henry Huggins and the rest of the boys and girls in the neighborhood go off to school. Today she was going to school, too. Today she was going to learn to read and write and do all the things that would help her catch up with Beezus.

"Come on, Mama!" urged Ramona, pausing in her singing and skipping. "We don't want to be late for school."

"Don't pester, Ramona," said Mrs. Quimby. "I'll get you there in plenty of time."

Ramona the Brave

Chapter One
Trouble in Tim Park

Ramona Quimby, brave and fearless, was half running, half skipping to keep up with her big sister Beatrice on their way home from the park. She had never seen her sister's cheeks so flushed with anger as they were this August afternoon. Ramona was sticky from heat and grubby from landing in the sawdust at the foot of the slides, but she was proud of herself. When Mrs. Quimby had sent the girls to the park for an hour, because she had an errand to do -- an important errand, she hinted -- she told Beezus, as Beatrice was called, to look after Ramona.

And what had happened? For the first time in her six years Ramona had looked after Beezus, who was supposed to be the responsible one. Bossy was a better word, Ramona sometimes thought. But not today. Ramona had stepped forward and defended her sister for a change.

"Beezus," said Ramona, panting, "slow down."

Beezus, clutching her library book in her sweaty hand, paid no attention. The clang of rings, the steady pop of tennis balls against asphalt, and the shouts of children grew fainter as the girls approached their house on Klickitat Street.

Ramona hoped their mother would be home from her errand, whatever it was. She couldn't wait to tell what had happened and how she had defended her big sister. Her mother would be so proud, and so would her father when he came home from work and heard the story.

Ramona Quimby, Age 8

Chapter One
The First Day of School

Ramona Quimby hoped her parents would forget to give her a little talking-to. She did not want anything to spoil this exciting day.

"Ha-ha, I get to ride the bus to school all by myself," Ramona bragged to her big sister, Beatrice, at breakfast. Her stomach felt quivery with excitement at the day ahead, a day that would begin with a bus ride just the right length to make her feel a long way from home but not long enough-she hoped-to make her feel carsick. Ramona was going to ride the bus, because changes had been made in the schools in the Quimbys' part of the city during the summer. Glenwood, the girls' old school, had become an intermediate school, which meant Ramona had to go to Cedarhurst Primary School.

" Ha-ha yourself." Beezus was too excited to be annoyed with her little sister. "Today I start high school."

"Junior high school," corrected Ramona, who was not going to let her sister get away with acting older than she really was. "Rosemont Junior High School is not the same as high school, and besides you have to walk."

Ramona had reached the age of demanding accuracy from everyone, even herself. All summer, whenever a grown-up asked what grade she was in, she felt as if she were fibbing when she answered, "third," because she had not . . .



Continues...

Excerpted from The Ramona Collection, Volume 1 by Beverly Cleary Copyright © 2006 by Beverly Cleary. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Customer Reviews

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The Ramona Collection, Volume 1: Beezus and Ramona, Ramona and Her Father, Ramona the Brave, Ramona the Pest 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My eight-year-old daughter received this set as an Easter present, and she hasn't been able to stop reading the books. Great gift for a young reader!
jose.jbar7644 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
bezzus and ramona were walking when they saw twon old ladies . ramona showed them her rash she got' beezus got mad and said ramona we do not show other people our rashes. when beezus was painting she had to make something from her imagination. then ramona came in and beezus said romana i thought you iin the sand box. ramona wanted to paint with beezus. then ramona was licking this one kids lollipop and he screamed hey thats mines. then ramona went back to the sand box because beezus said she'll tickle her. when henry came over with ribsy ramona locked him in the bathroom. luckily they got him out and beezus and her mom were disapointed. when beezus's aunt came she ask her were you and mom like ramona and i. they told the whole story and laughed. beezus thinks she will get used to ramona even if she is differenti think this book was very funny and creative. if i had a little sister that did these things i would have said are you crazy. i can't believe ramona put ribsy in the bathroom just because he ate her cookie. i think it was funny when ramona started a huge mess when she took the boys lollipop.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
good stories
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Rockalicious More than 1 year ago
This is a great book for a young reader who is a little more advanced with reading. The stories are fun and engages the kids for further conversation with parents.