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The Registry (Registry Series #1)
     

The Registry (Registry Series #1)

3.5 101
by Shannon Stoker
 

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Welcome to a safe and secure new world, where beauty is bought and sold, and freedom is the ultimate crime

The Registry saved the country from collapse, but stability has come at a price. In this patriotic new America, girls are raised to be brides, sold at auction to the highest bidder. Boys are raised to be soldiers, trained to fight and never question

Overview

Welcome to a safe and secure new world, where beauty is bought and sold, and freedom is the ultimate crime

The Registry saved the country from collapse, but stability has come at a price. In this patriotic new America, girls are raised to be brides, sold at auction to the highest bidder. Boys are raised to be soldiers, trained to fight and never question orders.

Nearly eighteen, beautiful Mia Morrissey excitedly awaits the beginning of her auction year. But a warning from her married older sister raises dangerous questions. Now, instead of going up on the block, Mia is going to escape to Mexico—and the promise of freedom.

All Mia wants is to control her own destiny—a brave and daring choice that will transform her into an enemy of the state, pursued by powerful government agents, ruthless bounty hunters, and a cunning man determined to own her . . . a man who will stop at nothing to get her back.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Mia Morrissey believed that her greatest achievement in life would be a top ranking in the Registry of marriage-eligible 18-year-old girls: “Since she’d been old enough to understand her duty and her role, Mia knew she would marry a very wealthy man.” Her illusions collapse when her sister, Corinna, flees an abusive husband and mysteriously dies shortly afterward. Mia discovers that the Registry is an oppressive system where women are commodities, created in the wake of a wartime disaster. Just before her wedding to arms dealer and likely psychopath Grant Marsden, Mia runs for Mexico, aided by her friend Whitney and—unwillingly—by her father’s farmhand Andrew. In this poorly-written, clichéd attempt to emulate popular tropes of dystopian fiction, it’s difficult to care whether Mia and her friends will make it to Mexico before Grant catches them, thanks to Stoker’s leaden prose, flimsy characters, sketchy world-building, and heavy-handed attempts at sociopolitical commentary. (June)
Jennifer L. Armentrout
“Beautifully written…a chilling and shocking look at a futuristic America that will stay with you long after you close the book.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062271723
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
06/11/2013
Series:
Registry Series , #1
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
623,873
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 7.84(h) x 0.86(d)

Meet the Author

Shannon Stoker is the author of The Registry and The Collection, the first two books in the Registry trilogy. She is a licensed attorney who works for Northern Illinois University, assisting students and staff with research integrity. She lives in DeKalb, Illinois, with her husband and small dog.

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The Registry 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 101 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In this futuristic America, Shannon Stoker vividly portrays a dystopian society that at first sight might seem extreme and farfetched but on second thought echoes values chillingly close to many realities of today. As the story unfolds, the reader sees Mia transform from a young woman following the status quo to an outlaw on the run simply because she seeks to secure a future of her own making. This book leaves you thinking about the very values that shape your own life perspective and makes you wonder how much this futuristic society is based on fantasy... The Registry is a fun read and I encourage anyone looking for a book to read by the pool or on the beach this summer to pick this one up. It is a quick read and leaves you eagerly awaiting the release of the sequels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very entertaining and surprisingly thrilling
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book. I love the Dystopian theme, I love the premise. All around I think it was well written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book was decent, writing at the beginning was immature and should have been taken care of in the editing process.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a free Friday book so i wasn't expecting much. I was pleasantly surprised and how much i enjoyed reading. Very good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The story idea was good, the actual writing of the book was not so good. I always knew what was coming.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed reading this book, I could NOT put it down until I was through. I believe it is the author's first novel, and while that does show in some awkward writing it also shows in the rampant enthusiasm through the whole book. The plot is engaging from the start, and while I sometimes wanted to wring characters' necks out of frustration, it made them all the more human and three-dimensional. The heroine is especially engrossing, as she struggles to overcome the limitations that were literally instilled in her from birth. As a woman, she was taught to believe that the most important thing she will ever do is become a wife. When she begins to doubt this, she has to slowly discover all those parts of herself that were trained into her, and try to separate them out from what is real and establish her own personality and identity. The number one indicator of whether a book is good or not is how easy it is to walk away from; I tore through The Registry in two days and then nearly lost it when I realized it is a part of a trilogy and the next won't be out until 2014! Overall, very enjoyable book as both an escape from the world we live in and a warning to watch out for some of the darker elements of our world.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read. Thought provoking. P J K
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A look at fictional futuristic America. A must read. I read this whenever I had free-time! :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good book, though I found the husbands behavior hard to believe.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Registry comes across as a knock-off of The Handmaid's Tale, with a little more dystopian edge. The reader never gets a good explanation of why society is configured the way it is (a few characters make valiant attempts). In addition, the bad-guys are pretty one dimensional characters, so perfectly evil they might have come out of a Victorian melodrama. The story was well-written, and despite the flaws, it held my attention, if not interest. I see there will be at least one sequel. Thanks, but I think I'll pass.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good book for young adult girls. Great example of how we can't afford to be sheltered - we need to know what is going on in the world and be a part of it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Credit to the author for a very original and intriging setting for her characters. It could have been an excellent backdrop for a great novel full of suspense, adventure, and romance. Nonetheless, the book as a whole fell flat. For any who are writers, the terms showing and telling should be familiar. Showing, revealing something through actions, words, motives, etc., is key to good writing; it brings the story to life with engaging dialogue and bright, exciting prose. However, this author is overboard on the telling and shy on the showing, simply spoon-feeding facts rather than letting the readers observe them on their own. Whole paragraphs are devoted to describing the internal traits of the main characters, and the author repeated these lifeless descriptions several times through the novel, causing it to drag. By incorporating more showing and severely trimming the telling, the author could greatly improve the story. While the characters seem to have cinder blocks tied to their feet because of the weighty and needless personal revelations peppered into most of the dialogue, they would not have been much better without them. Through the novel they are starved for development and are not satisfyingly original. Enter pretty rich girl and hot grouch, along with a mysterious, vengeful mogul who has a strange enfatuation with catching and killing the unfortunate miss. The romance and cliche love triangle developed later were contrived and predictable, and the villian was incredibly flat. Yes, he is selfish and cruel, that was jammed into the reader's eyes in each of his scenes, but no more is learned about him. A great villian is key to any novel worth reading, and he was not great. He is dangerous, but boring, about as deep in character as the guns and gadgets he likes to use. Where did he come from? Why does he want to kill the antagonist? Why did he want to buy an incredibly expensive wife in the first place? Who does he like to spend time with? What does he like to do, other than murdering people who annoy him and hosting man hunts? What was he like as a young man? What event or events caused him to become what he is? The author does not say. As for the other characters, they were unfortunately static; they changed little in their attitudes or world views despites the horrific things they experienced, and when they did show change, it was superficial or weakly developed. Finally, the message needed to be strengthened. It was simple, that women should be treated as people, not property. While this is an honorable and true statement, standing by itself it was a lonely pillar in the wind with nothing to give it meaning. What led the author to reach this conclusion? How, in the author's opinion, should the reader react and what should the reader do with this information? Again, these are questions essential to a fully-fledged story purpose that the author left dangling. This book is suitable for a light jaunt through fiction, but a reader could choose better. Flat prose, thick, syrupy characters as moveable as molasses and an important but underfed message left the reader wanting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I could not put this book down. It was exciting, tension filled and well written. I can't wait to read the others in this series. The story is so great, you can almost see it happening. Scary thought.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fast paced & full of action! You will have a hard time putting it down
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I finished this in an day. It was very fast paced and very action oriented. I tend to like slower paced books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I can't say the book was bad, exactly - the premise was interesting and although it was too much like The Handmaid's Tale, Mia has her own voice and the other characters were memorable. But the writing is so simplistic, and not in a good way - it made Twilight look like Shakespeare. (Actually, I enjoyed Twilight more.) I read this book in two hours, and I am really glad it was free. Now, to go back to Clary and Jace, or maybe read Hunger Games ir Divergent again ....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was okay. The Registry is an interesting theme.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Makes you think. Lots of action and suspense.
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