The Reporter Who Knew Too Much: The Mysterious Death of What's My Line TV Star and Media Icon Dorothy Kilgallen

The Reporter Who Knew Too Much: The Mysterious Death of What's My Line TV Star and Media Icon Dorothy Kilgallen

by Mark Shaw

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Overview

The Reporter Who Knew Too Much: The Mysterious Death of What's My Line TV Star and Media Icon Dorothy Kilgallen by Mark Shaw

Was What’s My Line TV Star, media icon, and crack investigative reporter and journalist Dorothy Kilgallen murdered for writing a tell-all book about the JFK assassination? If so, is the main suspect in her death still at large?

These questions and more are answered in former CNN, ESPN, and USA Today legal analyst Mark Shaw’s 25th book, The Reporter Who Knew Too Much. Through discovery of never-before-seen videotaped eyewitness interviews with those closest to Kilgallen and secret government documents, Shaw unfolds a “whodunit” murder mystery featuring suspects including Frank Sinatra, J. Edgar Hoover, Mafia Don Carlos Marcello and a "Mystery Man" who may have silenced Kilgallen. All while by presenting through Kilgallen's eyes the most compelling evidence about the JFK assassinations since the House Select Committee on Assassination’s investigation in the 1970s.

Called by the New York Post, “the most powerful female voice in America,” and by acclaimed author Mark Lane the “the only serious journalist in America who was concerned with who killed John Kennedy and getting all of the facts about the assassination,” Kilgallen’s official cause of death reported as an overdose of barbiturates combined with alcohol, has always been suspect since no investigation occurred despite the death scene having been staged. Shaw proves Kilgallen, a remarkable woman who broke the "glass ceiling" before the term became fashionable, was denied the justice she deserved, that is until now.

More about the book may be learned at thereporterwhoknewtoomuch.com or thedorothykilgallenstory.org.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781682610978
Publisher: Post Hill Press
Publication date: 12/06/2016
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 411,346
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.50(d)

About the Author

A former criminal defense attorney specializing in murder cases and the author of 25+ books, Mark Shaw was a legal analyst for USA Today, CNN, and ESPN during the Mike Tyson, O.J. Simpson and Kobe Bryant cases. In 2014 and 2015, he appeared on the REELZ Channel providing legal commentary for two Specials including “The Kennedys.”

Mr. Shaw, a San Francisco-based attorney, is best known for exposing the truth about important historical matters in his controversial books including Down For the Count (Mike Tyson Trial), Miscarriage of Justice (spy Jonathan Pollard), Melvin Belli (Jack Ruby's attorney), and The Poison Patriach (JFK assassination). Vanity Fair's James Wolcott called the latter, “Daring: Shaw points the bony finger of recrimination at JFK’s father,” Kirkus Reviews said it was “a clearly written polemic on the corruption of power built around an intriguing theory,” and The New Yorker proclaimed the book, “Ominous.” The author’s ability to defend his theories is possible through YouTube video footage of his debating bestselling author Robert Tanenbaum about the JFK assassination. To date, more than 25,000 hits have been recorded.

Mark began his media career as an on-air television personality for ABCs Good Morning America, CBS’s People, and ESPN. He is married to Santa Clara University librarian Wen-ying Lu. More about Mark is available at www.markshawbooks.com and Wikipedia.

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The Reporter Who Knew Too Much: The Mysterious Death of What's My Line TV Star and Media Icon Dorothy Kilgallen 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
11-8-65 More than 1 year ago
Mark Shaw's in depth investigation in the death of Dorothy Kilgallen confirms that there was a conspiracy in the JFK Assassination. Dorothy, unlike most other newspaper reporters of the day knew that did not accept the Warren Commissions findings and as a result this tough no holds barred reporter started her own investigation and what she uncovered may have made her a target. Had she lived to reveal to the world what she had in a file she had worked on for some 18 months, it's very possible that the course of history may have been changed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
CASH IN YOUR OPINION,TAKE THE TWO CENTS & GO MAKE A DOWN PAYMENT ON A PERSONALITY!!!! BY THE WAY THE BOOK IS GOOD****
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must read for true crime and history buffs.
JEN-E-- More than 1 year ago
Although we are a black family, I asked several of my elders if they remember the name Dorothy Kilgallen. Most said they remember her name, but do not know how, when or why she died. I never heard of her, but I now her name is synonymous with hero. She was a trailblazer at her time, so I feel bad that she gets more smears then cheers. Author Mark Shaw clearly chroniclizes the events surrounding her demise. Dogged research, no doubt, however he interviewed Marc Sinclair, Kilgallen's hairdresser. Shaw is clearly a champion for her: she was murdered. In order to maintain historical accuracy, Kilgallen's name mentioned with: JFK assassination-Oswald's assassination and Jack Ruby and his mob connection. Shaw names the infamous FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover and Mafia Don Carlos Marcello as the men who had more to gain with Kilgallen's death. Both clearly out rule her husband Richard Kollmar. Boyfriend Ron Pataky maintains they were never an item, but Shaw clearly defines the reasons that made him just that. By whose hands did Murder One fall? No offense to any one that makes this next statement an insult, but: didI noticed that Marilyn Monroe died the same way?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There is fascinating material here, but the dreadful writing made it very hard for me to read.