The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

by Gustave Doré, S.T. Coleridge

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780486223056
Publisher: Dover Publications
Publication date: 06/01/1970
Series: Dover Fine Art, History of Art
Pages: 77
Sales rank: 170,452
Product dimensions: 9.25(w) x 12.00(h) x (d)
Age Range: 11 - 18 Years

About the Author



French illustrator Gustave Doré (1833-83) began his prolific career at the age of 15, and his dramatic engravings have exercised an incalculable influence over latter-day artists. The remarkable scope of his work ranges from Milton, Dante, and the Bible to Rabelais, Shakespeare, and street scenes of 19th-century London.

Table of Contents

PART I."THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER": THE 1798 AND 1817 TEXTS
    
    Biographical and Historical Contexts
    The 1798 and 1817 Texts
    
PART II. "THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER": A CASE STUDY IN CONTEMPORARY CRITICISM
    
  A Critical History of "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    A Critical History: A Selected Bibliography
    
  Reader-Response Criticism and "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    What Is Reader-Response Criticism?
    Reader-Response Criticism: A Selected Bibliography
    A Reader-Response Perspective:
       Frances Ferguson, Coleridge and Deluded Reader: "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    
  Marxist Criticism and "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    What Is Marxist Criticism?
    Marxist Criticism: A Selected Bibliography
    A Marxist Perspective:
       David Simpson, How Marxism Reads "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    
  New Historicism and "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    What Is New Historicism?
    New Historicism: A Selected Bibliography
    A New Historicist Perspective
       Raimonda Modiano, Sameness or Difference?Historicist Readings of "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    
  Psychoanalytic Criticism and "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    What Is Psychoanalytic Criticism?
    Psychoanalytic Criticism: A Selected Bibliography
    A Psychoanalytic Perspective:
       Anne Williams, An I for an Eye: "Spectral Persecution" in "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    
  Deconstruction and "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    What Is Deconstruction?
    Deconstruction: A Selected Bibliography
    A Deconstructive Perspective:
       Susan Eilenberg, Voice and Ventriloquy in "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
    
  Combining Critical Perspectives on the "Rime"
       Paul H. Fry, Wordsworth in the "Rime"
    
  Glossary of Critical and Theoretical Terms
    
  About the Contributors

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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
surprisingly, i didn't read this poem for school,albeit, i have started to incorporate it into my school work. Trust me, anyone with a soul will enjoy the rime.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A Mariner freely kills one of God’s innocent creatures (an albatross). Guilt, punishment and redemption soon follow him and his crew. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner brings many metaphoric messages about treatment of life and is the origin of the symbol of the albatross being one of heavy guilt and an obstacle to success. As the mariner’s ship sails through stormy and fog filled seas, an albatross arrives as a “bird of good omen” to follow the ship and is thought to bring on good luck. The mariner though, decides to kill the bird and the crew cries out against what he has done. Later, as the fog clears and all appears to be calm again, the crew forgives him and makes themselves accomplices of the killing. The ship then sails on toward the north and halts in calm seas, and there it brings a draught that leaves the mariner and crew surrounded by water without anything to drink. The draught is soon to be considered a curse for the killing of the albatross, and soon after the crew of 200 men begins to die one by one. They hang the bird around the neck of the mariner to remind him of the curse he has caused. And as they die their eyes remain open, staring at the mariner further bringing guilt and blame. This haunts him and as they travel further toward the South Pole where there are no signs of life the mariner finds he is alone. The mariner is being punished for his sin of killing the albatross and prays for all of God’s creatures. Rain begins to fall signaling a break of the curse that has brought draught and killed the crew. Then, a Hermit sails toward the mariner through calm seas. The Hermit teaches through his own example to love all that God made and frees the mariner of his guilt and relieve him of his sins.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago