The Rise of the Dorkasaurus (Nerd Girls Series)

The Rise of the Dorkasaurus (Nerd Girls Series)

by Alan Lawrence Sitomer

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781423159506
Publisher: Disney Press
Publication date: 07/05/2011
Series: Nerd Girls Series
Sold by: DISNEY PUBLISHING WORLDWIDE -EBKS
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 1,096,350
File size: 828 KB
Age Range: 11 - 14 Years

About the Author

Alan Lawrence Sitomer is California's 2007 Teacher of the Year. In addition to being an inner-city high school English teacher and professor in the Graduate School of Education at Loyola Marymount University, Mr. Sitomer is a nationally renowned speaker specializing in engaging reluctant readers who received the 2004 award for Classroom Excellence from the Southern California Teachers of English and the 2003 Teacher of the Year honor from California Literacy. Alan's previous books include The Hoopster, Hip-Hop High School, Homeboyz, and The Secret Story of Sonia Rodriguez. Alan is also the author of Hip-Hop Poetry and The Classics, a text used in classrooms across the United States to engage disengaged students.

Customer Reviews

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The Rise of the Dorkasaurus 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
PunkinPatch More than 1 year ago
Wow! I love this book! The ThreePees have run the school for too long and the Nerd Girls have reached the tipping point...Game on! Nerd Girls is a great story of middle school with all its awkward, exciting, and hilarious moments. It's a tale of adolescent adversity and friendship with a cast of memorable characters on a very engaging middle school adventure. I was hooked from the very first line! I highly recommend this book to all!
Sippodream More than 1 year ago
Just read the book and can't give enough praise to how good it was. The story moves quickly and you can't wait to find out what happens next. Each chapter a new calamity awaits our heros and it gets funnier and funnier the deeper you go. Easy and very enjoyable read. While it appears catered to young women, anyone could relate to the middle school "drama" these Nerds have to contend with. A must read for all young adults and I sense a series will soon follow.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
THIS BOOK IS GREAT I COULDNT STOP READING IT its just right for 10-13
ReaderKidSamantha More than 1 year ago
This book made me LOL so hard. So many "funny" books are like 'tee-hee' but NERD GIRLS was like SO HYSTERICAL! And I could really relate to the characters. When I read the other review I could like tell it was clearly written by an adult but I think reviews should be written by kids because we're the ones who the book is written for anyway, right? NERD GIRLS is about what it feels like to not fit in, and about what true friendship is all about. 5 STARS and more... I really hope there are more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
this was by far the best book in THE WORLD!!! i loved it soo much that i would read it again
Seaberg Family Account More than 1 year ago
I borrowed from a friend and liked it ok yes i think appropriate maybe easier to understand if u were middle school or jr high but fine
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is a good book. I wouldn't say the best book i have ever read but it was very entertaining. I can also relate to some of the things that happen in the book. I would give this book 4 stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow even just reading what it is about makes me want to read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book so much please make another book! I can relate to the nerd girls at my old school. There was a group of girls that always bullied me and my friends. Yep love this book hopefuly i didn't spoil anything so yeah. Hailey 10
Natalie Roy More than 1 year ago
I m ten ,is it apportite?
Abigail Howard More than 1 year ago
I liked it but didnt love it........it could have been better
l_manning More than 1 year ago
When I first started reading this, I thought I was going to hate it. The beginning really turned me off. I'm glad I stuck with it however, as there were a lot of really good things about it. I'll start with what I didn't like first. The main character, Maureen, was not that sympathetic. I understand self-deprecation, but Maureen was a little too harsh on herself and everyone else she saw. Also, she didn't really read like a female character. It really did come across as a guy trying his best to get into the head of a tween girl, and it just didn't quite succeed for me. I loved the general story though. Trying to get back at the mean girls is probably not the best motivation in the world, but it worked well in how it gave the Nerd Girls a chance to form true bonds of friendship. I liked that the ending wasn't completely resolved, but it still made me feel good about what happened. I think the idea of acceptance of people no matter their quirks is very important, and I think it was handled really well in this book. Overall, I ended up enjoying the book a lot. That surprised me when I considered how I felt in the beginning. I think that girls will really enjoy the "girl power" in this book, and hopefully it can help them feel better about loving themselves as they are. So over all, I give this book the thumbs up. Galley provided by publisher for review.
jfatheree More than 1 year ago
My family enjoyed every single page of this book. It is a fun read, and one that I highly recommend.
flashlight_reader on LibraryThing 19 days ago
Am I allowed to say how much I LOVED this book? It was hysterical. Seriously. I snorted many a time while reading.I have to admit that I am a big fan of Alan Sitomer's books. I've read them all. Although he doesn't typically write books that I can relate to personally, my students adore his writing. They really hit home for teens in urban environments. Homeboyz, Hoopster, Hip Hop High School, and The Secret Story of Sonia Rodriguez are geared towards older teen readers (high school); but, Nerd Girls is perfect for middle school students! I have found the perfect read aloud book for my class next year. It's funny enough to keep their attention, and a perfect segue into some "harder" more traditional readings. You know you have to suck the kids in! Don't read this book if you're looking for deep, complex characters. It's not here. I'll admit that Maureen, aka "Mo," does under go a transformation throughout the novel. She's highly cynical and out right sarcastic (and I love it) for the majority of the book. By spending time with the other "nerd girls" and social outcasts of the 8th grade, she starts to develop real friendships. During this time her self image changes and she realizes that she has something to offer the world, even if she is the subject of an embarrassing top video on YouTube. Another great character is Allergy Alice. She undergoes a transformation throughout the book as well. Now, mind you that Allergy Alice is an absolute hot mess. She's practically allergic to air and everything else she comes in contact with. Her friendship with Beanpole Barbara and Maureen give her confidence and help her to cope with her fears. It's a really nice story of friendship perfect for middle school students. If you're like me and you tend to be over the top sarcastic, this book is perfect for you. You'll enjoy the witty narrator and the other characters. It is so tongue-in-cheek (but in a middle school friendly way) that I can't wait to read it again. My students are going to die laughing, I just know it! I even bought two hardback (full price mind you) copies today! One for myself and one for my BFF that is teaching 7th grade with me next year. I'm making her read this to her students as well. As a matter of fact, I'm going to call her around 7 a.m. tomorrow morning to tell her that.
lilibrarian on LibraryThing 19 days ago
If you look like a potato, you won't be popular in middle school. But sticking up for a misfit in the cafeteria gets you some friends, and into the school talent show.
booktwirps on LibraryThing 19 days ago
Thirteen-year-old Maureen is a self-proclaimed dork. Her hair is brown, her eyes are brown and her body oddly shaped: in her words, she looks like a baked potato. One day Maureen learns that the ThreePees (the pretty, popular and perfect girls) plan to sit next to Allergy Alice at lunch and eat everything Alice is allergic to, hoping for a YouTube worthy explosion. It¿s then that Maureen decides enough is enough. She forms her own group called the Nerd Girls, and together Maureen, Alice and Beanpole Barbara take it upon themselves to take the ThreePee¿s down a notch or two. The problem is, the ThreePee¿s are vicious. The Nerd Girls have their work cut out for them if they think they are going to overthrow this regime.In Nerd Girls, Mr. Sitomer gives us a younger version of Mean Girls. There are a lot of situational similarities between this book and that movie, but it didn¿t stop me from enjoying it. Maureen is a funny, self-deprecating narrator, and despite a few minor annoyances, I couldn¿t help but like her. The ¿ThreePee¿s¿ are vicious, caustic and annoying which is exactly the way I like my ¿mean girls¿. Overall, I liked the book for the most part, but it felt recycled, like I¿d read it before. It wasn¿t as fresh as I think it could have been. Still, I think young girls will enjoy it, though it may appeal more to the younger end of the middle-grade spectrum.(Review based on an Advance Reader's Copy courtesy of NetGalley)
l_manning on LibraryThing 19 days ago
When I first started reading this, I thought I was going to hate it. The beginning really turned me off. I'm glad I stuck with it however, as there were a lot of really good things about it. I'll start with what I didn't like first. The main character, Maureen, was not that sympathetic. I understand self-deprecation, but Maureen was a little too harsh on herself and everyone else she saw. Also, she didn't really read like a female character. It really did come across as a guy trying his best to get into the head of a tween girl, and it just didn't quite succeed for me. I loved the general story though. Trying to get back at the mean girls is probably not the best motivation in the world, but it worked well in how it gave the Nerd Girls a chance to form true bonds of friendship. I liked that the ending wasn't completely resolved, but it still made me feel good about what happened. I think the idea of acceptance of people no matter their quirks is very important, and I think it was handled really well in this book.Overall, I ended up enjoying the book a lot. That surprised me when I considered how I felt in the beginning. I think that girls will really enjoy the "girl power" in this book, and hopefully it can help them feel better about loving themselves as they are. So over all, I give this book the thumbs up.Galley provided by publisher for review.
foggidawn on LibraryThing 19 days ago
Nerd Girls: The Rise of the Dorkasaurus is a very predictable (if unlikely) story about three unpopular kids bonding together to bring down the popular clique. They plan to do this by winning the school talent show, which has been dominated by the popular clique's professionally choreographed cheerleading routine for the past two years. The problem, of course, is that the Nerd Girls don't have any talents to speak of. It's hard to figure out who the anticipated audience is for Nerd Girls. It seems to be trying to piggyback on the success of the "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" series, as it's the same sort of humor. However, the publisher is marketing it to an older age bracket (grades 6 and up). Most girls in middle and high school will not appreciate the potty humor and silly name-calling in the story, and boys (who might still appreciate the humor) will not touch it because it's a book about three girls. This book, if it appealed to anyone, might appeal to third-graders, so if the main characters had been sixth-graders, it would have made more sense. Perhaps more problematic than the recommended age range is the writing style, which feels forced and superficial, like a comedian trying his hand at writing for children, without knowing any actual children on which to base his characters' actions (Sitomer is, in fact, a high-school teacher, which makes the failure of characterization and dialogue all the more puzzling). The main character is completely unsympathetic; her every interaction with other characters is marked by sarcasm, name-calling, and a generally unpleasant attitude. It's also obvious that the girl characters are being written by a man, one who does not recognize that there are emotional and developmental differences between eight-grade girls and eight-grade boys. To add to the already numerous problems, the main character merits her "outcast" status by merit of being overweight, but only because she is constantly shoveling junk food in her mouth. When she makes up her mind to exercise and watch what she eats, she immediately starts dropping weight and feeling better. This kind of over-simplifying and stereotyping of overweight people may bother readers who struggle with their own weight, as the message the author is sending is that people are overweight because they are lazy and eat all the time, and if they would just try a little harder, they could easily lose weight. The other two nerdy characters are also stereotyped and one-dimensional: one is an allergy sufferer who totes around some sort of tank (apparently a normal inhaler wasn't funny or dorky enough) which she breathes from to combat allergic reactions. The other character is clutzier than Bella Swan, always falling over or banging her head against things hard enough to raise a lump, but her otherwise perfect parents don't seem to have the brains to take her to an inner-ear specialist and see if there's some physical issue causing this debilitating clumsiness.This book may find a readership among young readers who enjoy scatological humor and don't mind the flaws in the writing, but there are so many better books available on the topic of popularity that it should be easy to pass this one up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book sounds amazimgly awesome. I am what you would call a " book worm ". Im thinking about getting this book. These girls sound like they are some pretty good trouble. Like DRAMA trouble. If the other girls take out thheir claws than they will be some major compotition at the talent show. This can also be a real life problem. To give you my advice you might want to get this book.PEACE OUT! #LittleNinja
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I gave it a three because the book really went into me. I know how she feels, that happen to me once, then I had two friends who approached me and said,"Hi" and that's when we started being friends with a simple "Hi."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hello, my name is Anne Marie Laughter and I am an agony aunt ,I can answer any questions you have from boys , puberty,friend drama anything!!! See I need to branch out otherwise my magazine that I made with my friends with shut down my column. SO PLEASE!!! Ask for Anne Marie if you need any advice ,from one of the best. Oh and great book very refreshing. P.S Laughter is my real last name ,I know it sounds fake but I think it is absolutemua adorable. (That is the french way to say absolutely haha)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Chuckie Upkins!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sound good cant wait to reasd it