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Rising Tide
     

The Rising Tide

3.2 4
by Sunny Day Real Estate
 

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The first track on THE RISING TIDE, SDRE's fourth studio album, begins predictably enough for these emotionally charged rockers: Ringing, atmospheric guitar lines and sensitive emo-style vocals weave through waves of buzzing distortion and tumbling beats. Then something remarkable happens. The band's simple rhythms and four-four tempos turn on their sides and

Overview

The first track on THE RISING TIDE, SDRE's fourth studio album, begins predictably enough for these emotionally charged rockers: Ringing, atmospheric guitar lines and sensitive emo-style vocals weave through waves of buzzing distortion and tumbling beats. Then something remarkable happens. The band's simple rhythms and four-four tempos turn on their sides and transmogrify into a new, more technically profound piece of Real Estate. The scribbling guitars and Jeremy Enigk's falsetto vocals on "One" suggest the art-rock turns of Shudder to Think, and it only gets stranger from there. "Disappear" is an impossible blend of Cure-like dynamics and Queenesque histrionics, as deep, brooding bass lines intersect with operatic vocals. "The Ocean" sounds like a Roger Waters lullaby, whereas "Fool" features dense Middle Eastern-tinged melodies that recall Soundgarden and vocals reminiscent of Yes' "Heart of the Sunrise." Melancholy, but strangely ebullient, THE RISING TIDE makes prog rock sound hip again.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Heather Phares
Described by Jerermy Enigk as a "wake-up call," Sunny Day Real Estate's fourth album (and their first for Time Bomb) The Rising Tide presents the most accomplished version of their gripping, anthemic sound yet. Appropriate to its title, The Rising Tide comes in sweeps and swells, ranging from searching, uncompromising rock like "Killed By an Angel" and "One" to gentle, beautiful ballads like "Rain Song" and even pop-tinged songs like "Television," which sounds a bit like a more propulsive version of the Police's early '80s singles. Though the album was recorded with a trio lineup (Jeremy Enigk, Dan Hoerner, and William Goldsmith), it's some of the band's fullest-sounding work, rich with strings and keyboard flourishes that add extra depth to the shimmering, Eastern-inspired drones of "Fool in the Photograph" and "Faces in Disguise." Lou Giordano's production gives The Rising Tide an unabashedly big, clean sound that frames Sunny Day's detailed songwriting and arrangements perfectly, giving the restrained, reflective "Tearing in My Heart" and "The Ocean" as much impact as driven tracks like "Snibe" and "Disappear." Best of all is the title track, which blends a beautiful melody, heartfelt vocals, and an insistent rhythm into a sweeping, affecting finale. Expansive and complex without compromising the band's focused, impassioned style, The Rising Tide is one of Sunny Day Real Estate's -- and 2000's -- most impressive albums.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/20/2000
Label:
Time Bomb
UPC:
0709304354122
catalogNumber:
43541
Rank:
51914

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The Rising Tide 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This CD is a major departure from their earlier work, so I can understand why so many dislike this latest release. That being said, I was never a fan of their earlier work. I really enjoy this CD, and of all the CDs I own, this is in the top spot of rotation.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A remarkable album. Sure it’s different from earlier albums, but the songwriting is better than ever, and the songs are performed with as much heart as ever before. If you’re looking for Diary part 2 you should look elsewhere, but this record is their best effort, much thanks to the amazingly diverse songs and the sheer power of the performance.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Emotionally tortured artists sound best when they are not comfortable. Frankly, The Rising Tide sounds quite a lot like Jeremy Enigk's solo efforts, which will definitely disappoint fans of Diary and Lp2 (the pink album). I personally would've appreciated it if SDRE had named their band something different in order to pursue this rather questionable muse; for the slick production, keyboards, ultra clear vocals, and sometimes questionable lyrics seem to really betray SDRE's earlier albums, and left me bewildered as to just who this was (shaking the album cover several times to see if the name on the front was real didn't help). Jeremy sounds like Geddy Lee and Peter Gabriel nowadays, the fragile voice and tortured screams are lost in favor of an impressive-but-cold falsetto. Even with the very dark lyrics of the opening track 'Killed by an Angel', his vocals sound detached -like he is singing lyrics that he no longer identifies with. This may be due to the fact that he's happy now and found Jesus, but it doesn't appeal to the rest of us sad people. His voice is also drowned in an ocean of plucked acoustic guitars, strings, synths, endless open hihat strikes, and enough crystal-clear-syrup to choke a yak. This -as well as the carefully arranged production- gives the whole album a very synthetic feel; completely different from SDRE's emotionally naked music of the past. Musically, it all sounds rather pleasant. in fact it's downright pretty at times, it sounds like a pop record 70's prog-rock bands would make in the 80's. If it didn't have their name on the album you wouldn't know this was Sunny Day Real Estate -at all. In conclusion: I'm not saying that The Rising Tide is a 'bad album', I'm not saying that it was 'wrong' for SDRE to change into a radically different band, and I'm certainly not saying that they should've warned us before going from emo to over-produced-arena-prog-adult-contemporary...I am however, saying that I regret forking over $14.99 for it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hands down the worst album a great bunch of musicians has ever written. The first three SDRE albums are works of art (DIARY being one of my favorite albums of all time). I don't know what happened on RISING TIDE but it isn't good !!!! The song writing is unimaginative, the lyrics are silly, and the musicianship is not what you'd expect from such a talented band.