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The Rooster Who Went to His Uncle's Wedding
     

The Rooster Who Went to His Uncle's Wedding

by Alma Flor Ada, Kathleen Kuchera (Illustrator)
 

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What do you do with a beak full of mud, when the grass won�t help out�and the sheep won�t eat the grass�and the dog won�t bite the sheep? Well, if you�re Rooster, you ask your friend the sun, and he�ll surely turn things around! Told to Alma Flo Ada by her Cuban grandmother, this humorous, cumulative tale has been popular for generations. Will delight young children

Overview

What do you do with a beak full of mud, when the grass won�t help out�and the sheep won�t eat the grass�and the dog won�t bite the sheep? Well, if you�re Rooster, you ask your friend the sun, and he�ll surely turn things around! Told to Alma Flo Ada by her Cuban grandmother, this humorous, cumulative tale has been popular for generations. Will delight young children with the sheer joy of its repetitive rhythms. � Booklist Lively�A story hour hit. � School Library Journal Bright, sunny illustrations invite rereadings of this read-aloud treasure. � The Children�s Book Review Service Alma Flor Ada lives in San Francisco, California. Kathleen Kuchera lives in New York City.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kristin Harris
This Cuban version of a popular Latin American folk tale is illustrated with hand tinted etchings. The rooster's uncle is getting married, and he is off to the wedding. He forgets to eat breakfast. Spying a kernel of corn on the ground, he pecks at it. He ends up with a beak covered with mud, and he starts looking for help. The first thing he sees is grass growing along the roadside, and requests that the grass clean his beak. The grass won't do it. "Why should I," was the reply. That starts a narrative of the House That Jack Built variety. Lots of tongue twisting and repetition until the sun reverses the lack of cooperation and gets the rooster's beak all clean again. One of the nicest parts of this story is the liberties that can be taken in the retelling, such as the opportunity to incorporate other animals and friends along the rooster's path.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-- Rooster, en route to his uncle's wedding, struggles with the dilemma of whether he should risk of getting dirty in order to obtain a kernel of corn. His hunger overcomes his better judgment and, of course, he winds up ``. . . with a beak full of mud.'' This leads into a cumulative tale that will be familiar to anyone who knows ``The Old Woman and Her Pig'' or any number of its variants. In this case, his quest to get clean is nicely circular: the sun, just coming up as the book begins, is the one who agrees to break the chain of refusal, to repay the rooster for greeting him each morning. Ada's lively adaptation uses economical language with just enough detail to move things along. Vivid hand-colored prints illustrate the story well. All of the characters are festively arrayed: the blades of grass, for example, play musical instruments, and one is wearing a gaucho hat and a cape. The sheep wears a ruffled dress and has a bowl of fruit on her head, a la Carmen Miranda. The plain white borders contribute to the clean pleasing design. The stylized patterns, with lots of diamonds and zigzags, have the look of Central and South American folk art. A solid addition to folklore collections and a story hour hit as well. --Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780698116825
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
07/20/1998
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 9.72(h) x 0.18(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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