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The Rumor
     

The Rumor

by Anushka Ravishankar, Kanyika Kini (Illustrator)
 

In the village of Baddbaddpur, the people like to tell tales, “so tall that if you put them one on top of the other, they would reach the stars.” Pandurang is so dour that he can make milk turn sour. One day he coughs up a feather. As the story of Pandurang’s feather is passed from one person to another it grows and grows and grows until it can

Overview

In the village of Baddbaddpur, the people like to tell tales, “so tall that if you put them one on top of the other, they would reach the stars.” Pandurang is so dour that he can make milk turn sour. One day he coughs up a feather. As the story of Pandurang’s feather is passed from one person to another it grows and grows and grows until it can hardly be recognized. And that’s when the story weaves its magic on the ill-tempered Pandurang. An international version of “broken telephone” this is a funny cautionary tale about the nature of rumors.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“…The Rumor is a brilliantly written tale…. Combining elements of humour and nonsense into an Indian tale, along with Anushka Ravishankar’s wonderful verse writing, this cautionary tale of rumours is a fun and enjoyable read for any child or parent….”
—Highly Recommended, CM Magazine

“A multicultural –and universal –lesson on the dangers of gossip…. The warm, jewel-toned illustrations play with perspective…. A playful take on a familiar cautionary tale is enlivened by Subcontinental flair.”
Kirkus Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
In the prosperous mountain village of Baddbaddpur, India, the people spend a lot of time telling tall tales. A grumpy man named Pandurang, however, keeps to himself. One day, to his surprise, he coughs up a feather. He tells his wife about it, in verse, but warns her not to tell anyone else. Of course, she tells her friend, also in verse, making the feather into a bird. And so the story spreads, always in verse, growing ever more exaggerated, until there is a forest in Pandurang's mouth, from which all sorts of creatures are emerging. The whole village goes to see this wonder. When they tell Pandurang what they expect, to their surprise the grumpy man begins to laugh. Soon everyone is roaring with laughter at the tall tale. Kini's attractively detailed double page scenes picture the Indian village and villagers, with the focus on Pandurang and the many objects emerging from his mouth. We are treated to trees, flocks of birds, jungle animals, etc., all rendered naturalistically. We watch Pandurang's face change from grumpy to a final huge smile, followed by him and villagers belly-laughing. Turn the jacket over to reveal a scene from the book. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—Grumpy Pandu has the unusual experience of coughing a feather out of his throat and makes the mistake of telling his wife about the incident. Their tiny Indian village is a rumor mill, and before long the story is greatly exaggerated. Soon it is reported (in verse) that he coughed out a whole forest of trees and its myriad animals, a flock of birds, and…the feather. When Pandu hears the tale, he does something even more unusual; he laughs. The stylized ink and colored-pencil illustrations are bright and cheerful and depict the village inhabitants and their vivid imaginations.—Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC
Kirkus Reviews
A multicultural--and universal--lesson on the dangers of gossip. In the tiny village of Baddbaddpur, India, lived a grumpy man named Pandurang. He scowled and grumbled so much that no one ever wanted to be near him. But one day he had a coughing fit and, to his surprise, coughed up a feather. He told his wife, but urged her not to tell anyone else. However, she could not resist and told her neighbor about the strange occurrence. But in her version, he not only coughed up a feather, but the entire bird! The story is then passed from one person to the next, becoming more and more exaggerated with each telling. In the end, poor Pandurang has an entire forest growing from his mouth. Every time the rumor is told, Ravishankar uses humorous verse to add to the incredulity: "A tree grew inside Pandu's mouth-- / It grew and grew and grew and grew! / And on that tree, there came to nest / A flock of birds, full sixty-two!" The warm, jewel-toned illustrations play with perspective, growing Pandu's face larger and larger as the rumor gets bigger, until trees sprout from his molars and animals of all kinds spring from his wide, open mouth. A playful take on a familiar cautionary tale is enlivened by Subcontinental flair. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781770492806
Publisher:
Tundra
Publication date:
05/08/2012
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.39(w) x 8.27(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
4 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Anushka Ravishankar studied mathematics and is now a well-known Indian children’s writer, with over ten books of verse, fiction, and non-fiction to her credit. Her special talent is nonsense verse. She brilliantly adapts this difficult genre to Indian English usage without a false note.
 
Kanyika Kini graduated in communication design from Srishti School of Art, Design & Technology in Bangalore, India. She is deeply committed to sustainable design and traditional art. She now lives in Munich and freelances as a designer and illustrator.

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