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The Scottish Chiefs (Illustrated with linked TOC for easy navigation)
     

The Scottish Chiefs (Illustrated with linked TOC for easy navigation)

4.7 3
by Jane Porter
 

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• Illustrated book
• Images has been resized and optimized for the Nook
• Table of contents with working links to chapters is included
• The book has been corrected for spelling and grammatical errors
• New and improved version

Bright was the summer of 1296. The war which had desolated Scotland was then at

Overview

• Illustrated book
• Images has been resized and optimized for the Nook
• Table of contents with working links to chapters is included
• The book has been corrected for spelling and grammatical errors
• New and improved version

Bright was the summer of 1296. The war which had desolated Scotland was then at an end. Ambition seemed satiated; and the vanquished, after having passed under the yoke of their enemy, concluded they might wear their chains in peace. Such were the hopes of those Scottish noblemen who, early in the preceding spring, had signed the bond of submission to a ruthless conqueror, purchasing life at the price of all that makes life estimable-liberty and honor.



Prior to this act of vassalage, Edward I., King of England, had entered Scotland at the head of an immense army. He seized Berwick by stratagem; laid the country in ashes; and, on the field of Dunbar, forced the Scottish king and his nobles to acknowledge him their liege lord.



But while the courts of Edward, or of his representatives, were crowded by the humbled Scots, the spirit of one brave man remained unsubdued. Disgusted alike at the facility with which the sovereign of a warlike nation could resign his people and his crown into the hands of a treacherous invader, and at the pusillanimity of the nobles who had ratified the sacrifice, William Wallace retired to the glen of Ellerslie. Withdrawn from the world, he hoped to avoid the sight of oppressions he could not redress, and the endurance of injuries beyond his power to avenge.



Thus checked at the opening of life in the career of glory that was his passion-secluded in the bloom of manhood from the social haunts of men—he repressed the eager aspirations of his mind, and strove to acquire that resignation to inevitable evils which alone could reconcile him to forego the promises of his youth, and enable him to view with patience a humiliation of Scotland, which blighted her honor, menaced her existence, and consigned her sons to degradation or obscurity. The latter was the choice of Wallace. Too noble to bend his spirit to the usurper, too honest to affect submission, he resigned himself to the only way left of maintaining the independence of a true Scot; and giving up the world at once, all the ambitions of youth became extinguished in his breast, since nothing was preserved in his country to sanctify their fires. Scotland seemed proud of her chains. Not to share in such debasement, appeared all that was now in his power; and within the shades of Ellerslie he found a retreat and a home, whose sweets beguiling him of every care, made him sometimes forget the wrongs of his country in the tranquil enjoyments of wedded love.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013280007
Publisher:
Unforgotten Classics
Publication date:
10/13/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Jane Porter (17 January 1776 – 24 May 1850)
A Scottish historical novelist and dramatist.Her novel Thaddeus of Warsaw (1803) is one of the earliest examples of the historical novel,the book was praised by Tadeusz Kościuszko, the title character of the novel.
The Scottish Chiefs (1810), a novel about William Wallace, was also a successand it has remained popular.
Porter wrote a number of novels as well as two plays.

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The Scottish Chiefs 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As an 18 yr old teen, I didn't expect to find much in the many pages of this book, but I had heard about it from several people and gave it a try. What I found was a whole new idea of how I could live out my life. The way that Jane Porter writes, though hard to read at times, gives much more depth and meaning to the story. The pinnacle of the story for me is the character of William Wallace. He is a well known historical figure, but the way he is described in this book, gives another side to him that I found astounding. His example of real man-ness is phenomenal. I would recommend this book to anyone with the preface to read past the words and into the real life aspect. Enjoy the book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
waaaaaaah! This is the BEST book I have ever read in my entire short lifetime! I love how Wallace is so chivalrous and honorable! it's a MUST read for anyone who is scottish or wishes they were. If you don't read it you're missing out!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago