The Secret History of Wonder Woman

The Secret History of Wonder Woman

by Jill Lepore
4.1 11

Hardcover

$29.95
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The Secret History of Wonder Woman 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
dbps83 More than 1 year ago
Fascinating and complex look at Wonder Woman's times and mores. Suffragettes, birth control advocates, bondage (!?), alternative lifestyles, censorship. Exhaustive footnotes and bibliography. Great for book club discussion as it touches on so many issues, especially the different forms feminism has taken. A real history lesson, too
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Once opon a time, in princess zelda's caste...link! Quit playing your oun videogame! Ok princess. C'mon link! Let's kick some butt! Ok princess. I wont stop playing videogames untill you kiss me. Link,NEVER. Link! Help me! The blob got me! Zelda dont worry i will save you! No link, it is too late. No. I will save you! I shall save you, after i play videogames. Meanwhile, help me! Help help! Mwahahahahahahaha!!!!!!!!!!! I have captured you zelda!!!!!!! I know link will save me ganon. He probbaly wont. The thunder bird will surely kill him. Im on my way zelda.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved it was atleast one of my favorite dc books
TRFeller More than 1 year ago
The title is somewhat misleading. This book is really a biography of Wonder Woman creator William Moulton Marston (1893-1947) and his two wives, Sadie Elizabeth Holloway and Olive Byrne, a niece of Margaret Sanger who was the founder of Planned Parenthood. All three were strongly influenced by the early suffragists and feminists, especially Emmeline Pankhurst, and the author does a good job on showing those influences, especially feminist utopian fiction, on the early years of Wonder Woman. Armed with three degrees from Harvard, including a Ph.D. in psychology, Marston was the inventor of the first lie detector test, although the version actually used by police departments and government agencies was invented by one of his competitors. He had also written one novel and several screenplays before trying comic books and had been a consultant for Universal Studios when they were starting to produce horror movies. Except for her appearances with the Justice Society, Marston, under the pseudonym of Charles Moulton, wrote all of Wonder Woman’s adventures up until 1944, when he was stricken with polio and had to hire an assistant, and was still writing them up to two days before his death from cancer in 1947. He also hired Harry G. Peter, an illustrator for suffragette publications, to be the first artist to draw Wonder Woman. One of the early criticisms of the stories is that almost all of them featured bondage in one form or another, which was one of Moulton’s pre-occupations. He is also a polyamorist in that he lived with Holloway, Byrne, and sometimes a third woman named Marjorie Wilkes Huntley during the last twenty years of his life and had two children each by first two. His legal wife, Holloway, worked outside the home as an editor and actually supported the family because Marston multiple business ventures failed and he was unable to hold academic appointments for more than a year. Officially the “housekeeper”, Byrne stayed home and raised the children, although she did occasionally write articles for Family Circle. It was an article by Byrne, writing as Olive Richard, that brought Marston to the attention of M.C. Gaines, the first publisher of DC Comics, who hired Marston as a consultant to defend comic books against charges that they celebrated violence. Then in 1941, Marston persuaded Gaines to publish the adventures of a female superhero, who became Wonder Woman. I found the book quite fascinating and highly recommend to anyone interested in the history of either feminism or comic books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved the end notes almost as much as the main text. It's dishy, empowering, hypocritical, and ultimately engaging. Amazingly, it's non-fiction, which makes it even better.
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It is horable
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its not an app
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She looks like super man