The Shaken and the Stirred: The Year's Work in Cocktail Culture

The Shaken and the Stirred: The Year's Work in Cocktail Culture

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Overview

Over the past decade, the popularity of cocktails has returned with gusto. Amateur and professional mixologists alike have set about recovering not just the craft of the cocktail, but also its history, philosophy, and culture. The Shaken and the Stirred features essays written by distillers, bartenders and amateur mixologists, as well as scholars, all examining the so-called 'Cocktail Revival' and cocktail culture. Why has the cocktail returned with such force? Why has the cocktail always acted as a cultural indicator of class, race, sexuality and politics in both the real and the fictional world? Why has the cocktail revival produced a host of professional organizations, blogs, and conferences devoted to examining and reviving both the drinks and habits of these earlier cultures?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780253049742
Publisher: Indiana University Press
Publication date: 09/01/2020
Series: The Year's Work: Studies in Fan Culture and Cultural Theory
Pages: 432
Sales rank: 1,020,820
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.17(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Stephen Schneider is Associate Professor of English at the University of Louisville. He is the author of You Can't Padlock an Idea.

Craig N. Owens is Professor of English at Drake University. He is the editor of Pinter Et Cetera.

Table of Contents

Introduction: The Shaken and the Stirred (Stephen Schneider and Craig N. Owens)
Part 1: Muddled Mythologies
1 "The greatest of all the contributions of the American way of life to the salvation of humanity": On the Pre-History of the American Cocktail. (Jonathan Elmer)

2 The Boulevardier: Craft, Industrialism, and the Nostalgic Origin (Antonio Ceraso)
3 A Continued Stream of Fire: Professor Jerry Thomas invents the "Blue Blazer" (Christoph Irmscher)

4 The Sazerac: Ritual, Parody, and New Orleans Cocktails (Joseph Turner)
5 My First Time (Albert W.A. Schmid)

Part 2: Spirits of the Age
6 "They made me feel civilized": The Martini as Modernist Culture (Michael Coyle)
7 At Home with the Postwar Cocktail Party and the Cocktail Dress (Lori Hall-Araujo)
8 Middlebrow Cosmopolitanism and the Post-War Cocktail in Canada (Lisa Sumner)
9 Absolut Psychosis (Craig N. Owens)
10 Joy Perrine and the Bourbon Cocktail's Renaissance (Susan Reigler)

Part 3: Mixed Messages
11 Inventing Margarita: Femininity, Fantasy, and Consumption (Marie Sarita Gaytán)
12 Polynesian Paralysis: Tiki Culture and American Colonialism (Andrew Pilsch)
13 The Irish Car Bomb (and One Other "Disreputable" Cocktail) (Stephen Watt)
14 Bar Trek (William Biferie)
15 The Taming of the Shrub ( Dan Callaway)

Part 4: In A Glass, Darkly
16 The Lingering Louche: Absinthe, the Green Demon of Alternative Modernity (Aaron Jaffe)
17 A Rye Take on the Old Fashioned (Judith Roof)
18 Cocktails that aren't Cocktails for Gentlemen who aren't Men: Recovering the Metaphorical Body of the Fictional Drinker (Michael Lewis)

19 The Manhattan (Edward P. Comentale)
20 The Cold, Gray Dawn of the Morning After: Hangover Cures and the Inevitability of Excess (Stephen Schneider)

Afterword: Confessions of a Cocktail Nerd ( Sonja Kassebaum)
Contributors

What People are Saying About This

"Someone walks into a bar and orders a cocktail, its purpose is to get drunk, and, perhaps, get you drunk. But how you get drunk, what cocktail you order, matters. The Shaken and the Stirred brilliantly shows, each cocktail side by side on the menu here and now gestures to other times, places, worlds, real and imaginary.  The essays here decode a cocktail menu into a cultural history of North America. This volume shows how the otherworldly charm and significance of each cocktail emanates from its mythic origins, the way each drink opposes some other drink of another place or another generation, the way drinks recall the charismatic figures who drink them, or the times and places from which they emerged. Drinks are good to think as well as drink. You drink them not simply to get drunk, but, like the eucharist, to imbibe, participate in, these other worlds."

Paul Manning

Someone walks into a bar and orders a cocktail, its purpose is to get drunk, and, perhaps, get you drunk. But how you get drunk, what cocktail you order, matters. The Shaken and the Stirred brilliantly shows, each cocktail side by side on the menu here and now gestures to other times, places, worlds, real and imaginary.  The essays here decode a cocktail menu into a cultural history of North America. This volume shows how the otherworldly charm and significance of each cocktail emanates from its mythic origins, the way each drink opposes some other drink of another place or another generation, the way drinks recall the charismatic figures who drink them, or the times and places from which they emerged. Drinks are good to think as well as drink. You drink them not simply to get drunk, but, like the eucharist, to imbibe, participate in, these other worlds.

Lowell Edmunds

The cocktail is a thing to drink and also to talk about. The twenty essays in this collection are at the high end of the talk. The authors are distinguished in their various fields and bring historical and theoretical sophistication to their surprisingly varied takes on the subject.

Customer Reviews